Mrs. Watson's Class
Follow
Find tag "food"
9.1K views | +7 today
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Tristram Stuart: Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Tristram Stuart: Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.
Nancy Watson's insight:

As our need for food production grows, we need to do a better job of preventing waste. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Seeing Seoul: Museums, temples, markets and excellent food

Seeing Seoul: Museums, temples, markets and excellent food | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Exploring the historic and old-fashioned side of Seoul along with the ultra-modern side of the South Korean capital.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Visiting Seoul is a cultural experience like no other. The food, the smells, the skyscraper buildings beside palaces, and centuries of history and pride in the long and beautiful history of S.Korea. The city (and the country) are surprising to Westerners for their modern, safe, and welcoming atmosphere

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Gap in Diet Quality Between Wealthiest and Poorest Americans Doubles, Study Finds

Gap in Diet Quality Between Wealthiest and Poorest Americans Doubles, Study Finds | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Higher costs and limited supermarket access are cited as barriers to health.
Nancy Watson's insight:

More and more Americans are finding themselves in a food desert.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

The New Scramble for Africa

The New Scramble for Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Thought colonialism was over? Our new interactive infographic shows how corporations like Monsanto are scrambling to carve up Africa's food system: http://wdm.li/newscramble
Nancy Watson's insight:

Ah times change, but motives do not.

more...
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 22, 10:44 PM

Development/Agriculture Unit

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

National Geographic Investigates the Future of Food

National Geographic Investigates the Future of Food | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
By 2050, Earth will likely be home to more than nine billion people. That's a lot of mouths to feed. In a special eight-month series, “The Future of Food,” National Geographic investigates how to meet our growing need for nourishment without harming the planet that sustains us. Join the discussion in National Geographic magazine and online at NatGeoFood.com.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Disconnected from our food?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Mrs. Watson's World History
Scoop.it!

▶ MALTHUS AND POPULATION : TEN MINUTE GUIDE - YouTube

A ten minute guide to the 18th/19th century English classical economist Malthus and his theory of population. Produced for the history and context of journal...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Food fight

Food fight | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
OF THE many thousands of usually small protests that break out in China every year, few relate to national policy. Many consider the risk of challenging the central...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

The geography of food

more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Bringing the climate fight to the table

Bringing the climate fight to the table | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Low-emissions cooking aims to slow global warming one plate at a time -- with good food.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Chipotle's Gamble

"Watch The Scarecrow, the companion film for Chipotle's new app-based game. Then download the free app at www.scarecrowgame.com and join the quest for whole sustainable food."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:48 AM

Sounds good. I liked the video I saw.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:27 PM

If the Owners of Chipotle are actually growing and raising their animals organically they have no choice but to approach their competitors aggressively.  Growing high volume quality food is a much more expensive and slow process then genetically modifying animals to create higher yields. I thought the commercial was beautifully done and struck a tone I wish I heard more often. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:29 AM

This video probably set some of the leading fast food chains and restuarants on edge. Chipotle is starting an organic agricultural revolution, and with good reason. Most fast food cooperations are like the scare crow foods in the video, not using one hundred percent animal products, and using chemicals to enhance them. It is like that in other places too. Mnay farmers now are breeding chickens to have much larger breasts because that is what is in demand. But none of this is good for our bodies. Chipotle is one of many organic companies trying to go back to the basics and feed us food that is also good for us. They are showing us that this agricultural revolution can feed the people of the world. 

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

'More Than Honey' Sees A World Without Bees - NPR

'More Than Honey' Sees A World Without Bees - NPR | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
NPR 'More Than Honey' Sees A World Without Bees NPR An amiably shaggy combination of science lesson, whimsical musing and alarm bell, More Than Honey isn't as urgent as its eco-catastrophic subject — the possible destruction of the world's...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Eating together and expanding the table

Eating together and expanding the table | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Changing the way we eat, by consuming and wasting less, can help to resolve global hunger.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Good for ag unit

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 27, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:28 PM

Bolivia is one of the few countries where McDonalds failed, so Bolivia is obviously doing something right in regards to its food industry. Bolivians' love of traditional food coupled with the loyalty to street vendors and local businesses. Bolivia does not treat its food industries as a potential market, but instead many food transactions involve trade as opposed to currency. Laws conserving local food culture and the elimination of most foreign parties has allowed for a very effective food sovereignty. 

 

Many countries, especially the United States, could benefit from this "food sovereignty", where the local individuals are honored and protected while large corporations are kept an arm's length away. Not only does this boost local small scale economies, but it would decrease pollution and preserve food culture.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:00 AM

"A Country With No McDonalds". I read this and thought to myself, how bad can that be? McDonalds isn't exactly the best option for food. In Bolivia, McDonalds doesn't exist and hasn't for about a decade. Believe it or not, McDonalds couldn't survive in the mountainous area so they were forced to close down in 2002. In 2011, a documentary was made about how odd it was that Bolivia didn't have a McDonalds. The documentary tells us that one of the main reasons the fast food restaurant closed down was because Bolivians preferred their traditional food over fast food. The documentary also stated that Bolivians do love hamburgers, which are not traditional. However, they prefer to buy them from the many indigenous women hawking food on the streets. People line up for these hamburgers on the street, so its almost like their own form of McDonalds. Mostly, they prefer to buy from people they have a relationship with, typically from their own community.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

more...
Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

We Are What We Eat: Documenting Dinners Around the World

We Are What We Eat: Documenting Dinners Around the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
National Geographic Photo Blog
Nancy Watson's insight:

Culture and Agriculture Unit.

more...
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 12:44 PM

Culture and agriculture unit

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

10 Great Agriculture Infographics

10 Great Agriculture Infographics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A collection of 10 interesting and informative agriculture infographics from around the Internet.
Nancy Watson's insight:

The story of your food is not a simple thing. There are lots of steps in the commodity chain that take a piece of every dollar. Subsidies and allotments keep prices up or down depending.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Map: Here's how much every country spends on food

Map: Here's how much every country spends on food | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Americans spend 7% of their budget on food. Pakistanis spend 47%.
Nancy Watson's insight:

And we think food is expensive. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

French Schools No Longer Allowed To Offer Special Lunches To Muslim Students

French Schools No Longer Allowed To Offer Special Lunches To Muslim Students | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
PARIS, April 4 (Reuters) - Far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen said on Friday it would prevent schools from offering special lunches to Muslim pupils in the 11 towns it won in local elections, saying such arrangements were contrary to F...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Are we going backwards in multiculturalism?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

28 Fruits And Vegetables That You Had No Idea Grew Like That

28 Fruits And Vegetables That You Had No Idea Grew Like That | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
OK, some of these you might know, but the first time I saw Brussels sprouts in their true form , I literally screamed.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Be ware of the unsightly language, but the surprising info is worth the read. Even I, the farmer, was surprised by a few!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

​Inside My Shopping Cart: Food, Culture and Geographic Yearning

​Inside My Shopping Cart: Food, Culture and Geographic Yearning | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
I am in the kitchen of the house I grew up
in,
holding a head of cabbage stable on the cutting board with both hands,
while my
mother thrusts a cleaver into it, slicing it in half.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 11:42 AM

With health nuts discovering Quinoa the demand for this protein packed weight loss grain is quickly increasing throughout the world it is hard to keep up with supply.  Quinoa is typically grown in the Andes Mountains, limiting the area of which it can be grown.  The increase in demand for this superfood is also affecting the locals who used this as an item in their daily meals.  With production down and demand up the price is on the rise, even for those locals who had enjoyed this grain for relatively cheap for a good amount of time. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2:20 PM

Quinoa has a seen an explosion of popularity on international markets due to its healthy nature, simple preparation, and culinary versatility. While its increased trade has helped bring more money to the farmers and the region, it has also made the price of quinoa too high for many of the locals. To limit the availability of such a staple food to the locals could have many detrimental effects. It shows how expanding into the global arena can have good economic effect for some, it can still undermine other parts of the already established economy.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 12:15 PM

Quinoa has gone from a traditional food only consumed by those living in the Andes Mountains to a global phenomenon. Historically, Quinoa was consumed by locals in the Andes Mountains in order to supplement their diet. Recently, it has developed a reputation as a super food, with people claiming that it can help lose weight and has tremendous health benefits. While this may be true, food fads such as this have the potential to greatly affect the historic growers. Since its boom on the global market, Quinoa has become incredibly expensive. The people that once depended on it for sustenance can no longer afford it, thus leading to economic and food issues in these localities. It is important to understand that these exotic, popular foods can maim entire ways of life where the foods were once just foods, and not super foods. 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Scott Langston's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:48 PM

An image our Grad 11 students can at least have some empthy with....

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Hunger in America - The Atlantic Cities

The Geography of Hunger in America - The Atlantic Cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Geography of Hunger in America
The Atlantic Cities
The U.S.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 27, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:28 PM

Bolivia is one of the few countries where McDonalds failed, so Bolivia is obviously doing something right in regards to its food industry. Bolivians' love of traditional food coupled with the loyalty to street vendors and local businesses. Bolivia does not treat its food industries as a potential market, but instead many food transactions involve trade as opposed to currency. Laws conserving local food culture and the elimination of most foreign parties has allowed for a very effective food sovereignty. 

 

Many countries, especially the United States, could benefit from this "food sovereignty", where the local individuals are honored and protected while large corporations are kept an arm's length away. Not only does this boost local small scale economies, but it would decrease pollution and preserve food culture.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:00 AM

"A Country With No McDonalds". I read this and thought to myself, how bad can that be? McDonalds isn't exactly the best option for food. In Bolivia, McDonalds doesn't exist and hasn't for about a decade. Believe it or not, McDonalds couldn't survive in the mountainous area so they were forced to close down in 2002. In 2011, a documentary was made about how odd it was that Bolivia didn't have a McDonalds. The documentary tells us that one of the main reasons the fast food restaurant closed down was because Bolivians preferred their traditional food over fast food. The documentary also stated that Bolivians do love hamburgers, which are not traditional. However, they prefer to buy them from the many indigenous women hawking food on the streets. People line up for these hamburgers on the street, so its almost like their own form of McDonalds. Mostly, they prefer to buy from people they have a relationship with, typically from their own community.