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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Environmental ecology. What do we need to know about conserving the Arctic?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Across sub-Saharan Africa, consumer demand is fueling the continent’s economies in new ways, driving hopes that Africa will emerge as a success story.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Core countries "mass consumption" and desire for cheap goods may help pull Africa forward.

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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Nancy Watson's insight:

About 1/7 of the world population lives on $1 a day (or LESS)

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 8:33 AM

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

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The world's shifting centre of gravity

The world's shifting centre of gravity | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How the world's economic centre of gravity has shiftedIT IS not exactly news that the world's economic centre of gravity is shifting east. But it is striking how...
Nancy Watson's insight:
Interesting graphic for economic unit
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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:30 PM

It's interesting to see years after colonialism and imperialism there the nations it colonized are still having contact with their 'mother country'. For example the countries of Angola and Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau gained independence in the 1970's and they still trade with Portugal and are dependent on one an other to an extent, and language definitely has something to do with it.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:46 PM

Africa is a huge continent filled with tons of countries. Language is widespread even within a city or town. Throughout Africa, there is no denying that the languages vary drastically. All the languages however are among the most spoken languages in the world. More business for Africa!

The ServiceMag's curator insight, September 9, 12:30 PM

The 'Other' category is much underestimated. Therefore, incorrect!

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 28, 9:56 AM

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 28, 12:24 PM

This could be an economic boom for Nicaragua, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere. However, this construction could potentially cause serious problems. The proposed canal would pass through or near nature reserves and areas inhabited by indigenous groups. Also, it would pass through Lake Nicaragua, the largest fresh water lake in Central America. This lake holds fresh drinking water for the people and is home to rare fresh water species, such as the fresh water shark, which could be effected negatively by this construction.

Although this canal could turn Nicaragua’s economy around, it could also cause negative impacts on their environment. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:28 PM

Although Nicaragua would benefit from this financially the whole country would be carved up because of the other nations total rule over the imports and exports in trading routes.

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The 20 year history of NAFTA

The 20 year history of NAFTA | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In the 20 years since it entered into force, the North American Free Trade Agreement has been both lauded and attacked in the United States. But to properly assess NAFTA’s record, it is important to first be clear about what the agreement has actually done. Economically speaking, the answer is a lot.


NAFTA was the first comprehensive free-trade agreement to join developed and developing nations, and it achieved broader and deeper market openings than any trade agreement had before.

NAFTA did that by eliminating tariffs on all industrial goods, guaranteeing unrestricted agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico, opening up a broad range of service sectors, and instituting national treatment for cross-border service providers. It also set high standards of protection for patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets.

NAFTA ignited an explosion in cross-border economic activity. Today, Canada ranks as the United States’ largest single export market, and it sends 98 percent of its total energy exports to the United States, making Canada the United States’ largest supplier of energy products and services. Mexico is the United States’ second-largest single export market. Over the past two decades, a highly efficient and integrated supply chain has developed among the three North American economies.  Intraregional trade flows have increased by roughly 400 percent.

North Americans not only sell more things to one another; they also make more things together. About half of U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico takes place between related companies, and the resulting specialization has boosted productivity in all three economies. NAFTA has also caused cross-border investment to soar.

In spite of this impressive economic record, NAFTA has its critics. Most of those who attack it on economic grounds focus on Mexico, not Canada, and claim that the partnership is one-sided: that NAFTA is Mexico’s gain and America’s pain. But the economic data prove otherwise.


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Gary Yarus's curator insight, February 19, 8:24 AM

A good review for those concerned about the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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China and Taiwan

China and Taiwan | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Will China win its 65-year war with Taiwan -- without firing a shot?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 9:45 AM

As one analyst quoted in this article says, the whole point of China's policy is to try to create an environment where the people are Taiwan want to be unified with mainland China.  China has opened up economically towards Taiwan to foster this in "an offer they can't refuse." What would your position on this issue be if you were advising China, Taiwan or the United States?  

Yiannis Tsingos's curator insight, February 15, 4:57 PM

Great resource for conflict resolution

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:40 PM

China and Taiwan have been battling each other without physically fighting for decades. Nowadays someone needs to take charge and eliminate this battle. Can China do it without releasing its militia?

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The Myth of Industrial Rebound

The Myth of Industrial Rebound | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Don’t buy the hype about a manufacturing revival. It’s not enough to restore the U.S. economy.
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Meet The Humble Container That Moves The Global Economy

Meet The Humble Container That Moves The Global Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.
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10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy — This Chart Shows How

10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy — This Chart Shows How | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Ten mega corporations control the output of almost everything you buy; from household products to batteries. But it gets even crazier who when you see who controls the money.
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This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa

This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This graph is worth as many as you can take out of it.
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Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41 - YouTube

Nancy Watson's insight:

Globalization 

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 1:01 PM

Unit 1 Globalization

(Key term)

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 10:45 AM

seth dixon:This is an excellent article to explore some of the problems confronting megacities.

Jade ten Kate's curator insight, July 10, 1:01 AM

Megacities

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:16 PM

APHG-U7

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10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy

Information clearing house

Nancy Watson's insight:

Great example of vertical and horizontal integration. Some surprises here, although not all are actually owned by the indicated parent company, but do have connections

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Rwanda Reaches for New Economic Model

Rwanda Reaches for New Economic Model | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A country is looking to attract investors, not donors, to transform a tiny rural economy into a financial and high-tech hub for the region.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Rwanda was savaged with a civil war and genocide in the early 1990s and now it is creating an economic model to embrace high tech industry for the region. Progress

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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 2, 3:31 PM

LDCs are lean and hungry (tortoises) while the MDCs are fat and complacent (rabbits).

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 21, 1:34 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 4:32 PM

Consumed in Europe these container ships have the amount of steel of  8 Efile Towers in one container. It is a quarter mile long and taller than that of the Olympic stadium in London.  

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Why Gentrification Is So Hard to Stop

Why Gentrification Is  So Hard to Stop | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Gentrification isn't new -- it's actually baked into the economic forces that have been driving urban development since the 1950s.
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Shifting post-colonial economic geographies

Shifting post-colonial economic geographies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Changes in relationships can be hard to take. The economic bond between Latin America and Spain, its biggest former colonial power, is shifting as the region’s economies mature. Despite some ruffled feathers, the evolution is positive.  After two decades in which Spain amassed assets worth €145 billion ($200 billion) in Latin America, last year was the first in which Latin American companies spent more on acquiring their Spanish counterparts than the other way around."


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 1:37 PM

Post- Coloonial Economical Gographies- It is important to remember that in the past Latin American companies spent less on acquiring the Spanish counterparts and last year for the first time they have shifted in which Latin America spent more acquriring their Spanish counterparts. After teo decades Spain's worth would be close to $200 billion in Latin America. Latin America in relation to Spain is very different because gears have shifted in order fot the net worth to compile to where it is today. The same goes for Spain in relation to Latin America.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:43 PM

This article describes the changing relationship between Latin America and its former colonial power, Spain. Latin America shares a cultural bond with Spain which is influencing how the Latin American economies develop. This cultural bond, along with the economies, are having an effect on migration.

As Latin American countries are becoming increasingly industrialized their economies have grown and Latin America is frequently looking at Spain for a place to invest due to their cultural similarities, like language. Latin America is investing in Spanish business while Spain, in an economic slump at home, is benefiting from Latin American markets and investments. Unsurprisingly, over the past several years trade between the Spain and Latin America has become more and more profitable for Latin America as their increasing industrial power can send manufactured products to a more deindustrialized Spain.

The economic slump in Spain is seeing Spaniards migrate away from their home country. Latin America, with its cultural similarity, is increasingly becoming a destination for these Spaniards in need of work due to the growing economies of Latin American countries. Some migrations may even be the result of Latin American investors owning a large portion of a Spanish worker's company in the first place.

This flip in economic power is unsurprisingly since it would be impossible for Spain to keep pace with its former colonies collectively. Though depleted by colonization, there are still significant resources available to Latin America, chief among them cheap agricultural labor and massive amounts of fertile land. Even with friction over their colonial past with Spain, Latin America is still investing in Spain and Spaniards still look to Latin America for work and investment opportunities.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:35 PM

Unit IV

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Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.

 

So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Maybe we can stop being called the periphery

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Etd11's curator insight, February 17, 3:08 AM

is there a widening income disparity in the US? What are the reasons for this disparity?

viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 9:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 2, 4:19 PM

Poverty, no longer a southern thing. What has changed this?

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:52 AM

The Worlds biggest ship to be launched soon by Shell is an amazing feat, created by human ingenuity. It is incredible that it is longer than the Empire state building. it is difficult to imagine how an object so long even moves by itself. Nicaragua is attempting to make a canal Bigger than Panamas to support a ship thate size of the prelude that will operate off the coast of Australia for the next 25 years. The fact that it needs to be towed to its destination makes one question if its really a ship or not. Regardless Shell will share the cost of the Oil vessell once its finished being built

Julia Rose Turco's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:02 PM

Wow, this is interesting! I can't believe its that long! I wonder how long it took them to build it? Also, where is it going?  Also, why would they need it to be so big? Why can't they just use a smaller ship and make more trips? But overall this is very cool.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching -