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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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Mapping the Way to a More Equal World

Mapping the Way to a More Equal World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Inequality isn't just about money. It's also about information. The lack of reliable data about developing countries makes things like development work and disaster relief much harder.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 4:54 PM

There is 'mapping inequality' throughout the world; poorer countries often don't have comprehensive census information and geospatial data.  Crowd-sourced mapping is seeking to change and improve geographic awareness, especially in moments of crisis.  For example the maps of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea were essentially blank at the beginning of the Ebola outbreak but that glaring need meant volunteers were using geographic tools to improve developmental situations by providing more information.


Tagspodcast, disasters, mapping, cartography.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma

Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Explore the Bing map, or Google map of Moore, Okla. More on the Oklahoma tornado:

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 11:29 AM

Seeing the damage done to all of these homes and communities is devastating. You see all the destruction in different areas on TV, but looking at it from a maps perspective is so much different. Seeing how it was and then looking at it after is unreal. The damage that is done to so much land is saddening. Then to look at the map of all the tornadoes since 1950 was eye opening. I never realized that there was so many tornadoes that occurred throughout the U.S since 1950. It was also shocking to see that there had been a huge tornado in the Boston area that took peoples lives. Usually when I think about tornadoes I don't think about them in Boston, Connecticut, or New York. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 9:03 PM

The before and after images in this picture are insane. Living on the east coast it's hard to picture losing your home (your whole life) in a matter of mere seconds or minutes. It is really sad to see pictures such as these, and even more devastating to see the families affected by this with looks of disbelief. However, what is encouraging to see from tragedies such as these, is the community helping each other regardless of whatever background a person may have. Unfortunately it is moments like these that force people to help others without the thought of asking or seeking some sort of favor in return.  

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:37 PM

I look at these pictures and I can't help but feel bad for the people that were apart of this tornado. In minutes your whole life can change. The picture of the corner house there before the tornado and afterwards nothing, your whole life changed. I couldn't imagine the heartbreak these families went through, loosing everything. 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:57 AM

Click here to see a higher resolution version of this map (don't dismiss it as just a cartoon!).  


Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.