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Where The Hell Is Matt? (Video)

Where The Hell Is Matt? (Video) | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This is truly horrific dancing with high comedic value and engages students.  However, the cultural icons, environmental settings and social context within which these images are spliced make this more than just "fluff" piece to distract the students. 

"Dancing Badly Around the World."


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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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Where is Matt?

Just in case you've never seen it, this is my favorite "horrible dancing" video.  Filmed in over 40 countries, the dancing is just a silly prop for the realy unfolding drama.  The gorgeous cultural and physical landscapes literally take center stage in this production.  The cultural icons, environmental settings and social context within which these images are spliced make this more than just "fluff" piece to distract the students.  It's a clip that can instill a desire to travel the world over to gain more geographic knowledge. 


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Lanastasiou's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
very funny video and it was interesting to see how each culture has their unique style of dancing!
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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:16 PM

Not only Vanuatuan individuals, but we see many different cultured people visit america to experience technological lives that poor economic nations wouldn't be able to experience. Vanuatuan homes are not as fancy, strongly built or even as big as buildings that you'll find in the United States and I think it was a good opportunity for people of Vanuatu to witness how other people live especially when it's more advanced than their cultures. Vanuatu won't find roller coasters, concerts or many other entertainment experiences in their region like they would in America. I live in a region full of technology and entertainment and I could only imagine if I was visiting an area that had more like what Vanuatu was experiencing. Since, America and Vanuatu was experiencing each other's culture styles, it helps them even out their living conditions and what the higher economic region (United States) can do to help the lower economic region. (Vanuatu)

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 4:34 PM

This is an interesting concept because it switches who the anthropologists are in essence.  The United States becomes the foreign and exotic land being studied by people who are not native to its ways or customs.  It also lets the villagers address globalization in their own way, they get to go to America and see how the civilization lives compared to their own.  Although this sounds like a funny, reality tv show it was pulled from the air because some people didn't like what it was really doing, Americans were getting a laugh from people  "less sophisticated" than us coming to the US.  In the show, the natives also reinforce many regional stereotypes that exist in the US' own borders.  Geographical inspired tv can be a controversial place at times.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 6:59 PM

This is a very interesting as both men travel to America from a place where they have lived all their lives. A cross cultural experiment that shows globalization and modernization and how it takes effect. its pretty interesting as i know multiple people who have had to adjust to the lives in the western worlds, and try to find a place within the society and try to blend in, but end up hating it and moving back to their roots so its a very interesting take on modernization, global culture with the culture they are used to.

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Understanding Poverty in the United States

Understanding Poverty in the United States | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Analysis of poverty in the USA: poor children rarely hungry; poor often have cable TV, air conditioning, a computer, and larger homes than non-poor Europeans.

 

This is an interesting series of bar graphs, pie charts and other data sets, all showing helping us to contextualize the life of the poor.  How is 'being poor' in the United States distinct from poverty in other regions of the world?  Is it fair to distinguish between the two?  How do you define poverty?  Is it a universal standard that is the same everywhere or is it a relation measure compared to others within the community? 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 22, 2012 8:22 AM
i believe one of the major issues as was stated, is coming up with a true definition of poverty. The word should not be merely thrown around. A practical definition would include the ability to acquire your basic needs, food, shelter etc, all your necessities. I hate to break it to them, but cable tv, is not essential to daily life. Air conditioning is a thin line, depending on whether or not the person(s) require it due to medical conditions. Sure it is wonderful to have the internet and video game systems, but it doesn't make it unlivable to go without. As long as you have a decent living space with your bills paid and enough food to eat, you can hardly be considered poor.