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In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters

In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The odds of rising to another income level are notably low in certain cities, like Atlanta and Charlotte, and much higher in New York and Boston.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ryane Williams's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:47 PM

Facilities management entails a broad array of disciplines including, but not limited to, planning, designing, leasing, space planning, product management, capital management, construction management, property management, and real estate acquisition, planning and disposal.

Jordan Anderson- www.havefunandprofit.com's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:58 PM

Location is very important to have more income!

Charles Henderson's comment, August 14, 2013 12:37 AM
Would have been nice for them to include cost of living comparisons. You might be in the top 20% of the country making $107,000 in NYC, but that's only $48,000 in Atlanta. Median income in Atlanta is $30,000 which would be $67,000 in NYC (about $21000 higher than NYC's current median salary). Where you live makes a difference, but HOW you live is just as important.
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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.


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João Carreira's comment, September 4, 2012 1:24 PM
...Even as portuguese, I apreceated it very much. Thank you.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 6, 2012 9:30 AM
This movie clip does demonstrate how language is connected not only to space and location but individual or group experiences as well. The languages used by the upper and lower orders in addressing each other or an “outsider” are very distinct within this film. Therefore if you’re socioeconomic status effects the way you speak then perhaps the type of langue you use can indicate what different social groups within a society consider comical or entertaining such as dance and music?
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 9:18 PM
My Fair Lady has always been one of my favorite movies, and it really sparked my interest in linguistics and accents. Not only does your accent define where you’re from physically, but it defines where you’re from socially, as well. While Eliza Doolittle is from the same country, region, and city as Prof Higgins and the people coming out of the theater, she sounds completely different. Right away, her speech gives away what kind of social background she comes from.
Similarly to the “When did Americans lose their British accents?” article, this article helps relay how accents can help define a physical area, and it also shows a connection between accent and economics. Accent is both a cultural and an economic part of geography.
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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.