Mrs. Watson's Class
30.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

What race would you be 100 years ago, according to the US Census?

This interactive graphic shows the census categories for every decade from 1790 to today.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population Unit Using census data and changes in terms used on the form

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urban Areas and Income Inequality

Urban Areas and Income Inequality | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 3:51 PM

What do these maps tell you?


Tags: statistics, census, mapping.

Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:25 PM
The difference in incomes in this city is astronomical. Literally from one neighborhood to the next you can notice the difference.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gerrymandering Visualized

Gerrymandering Visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
By simplifying gerrymandering we see how problematic it really is.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Aaron Burnette's curator insight, February 10, 9:58 AM

Gerrymandering is when a party redraws boundaries so it gains only supportive feedback.

Kiersten Wright's curator insight, February 10, 6:39 PM

I agree that the process should be taken out of human hands. Why not take advantage of the technology we possess? Although the visuals are simplistic, they accurately depict the inequity. Gerrymandering is unfair, and definitely does not reflect the idea of a fair government that we aspire to be. - K.W.

Rylee English's curator insight, February 18, 10:10 AM

this article breaks down gerrymandering through visualizations. after reading this and looking at the visual representations, gerrymandering makes alot more sense. the author did not give information as to consequences or why gerrymandering occurs. RE

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration