Mrs. Watson's Class
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Gendering Agriculture | Africa Renewal Online

Gendering Agriculture | Africa Renewal Online | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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Women in Agriculture - African women are highlighted in this Special Edition article, Gendering Agriculture

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Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 12:03 PM

unit 5

Women in Agriculture - African women are highlighted in this Special Edition article, Gendering Agriculture

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Where women work, and don’t: A map of female labor force participation around the world - The Washington Post

Where women work, and don’t: A map of female labor force participation around the world - The Washington Post | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This doesn’t just matter for women’s welfare – it matters for a country’s ability to succeed.
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Gender 

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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Edison High - AP Human Geography
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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Jacquez
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:35 PM

This is amazing!  Although Ethiopia still has a long way to go in the medical field they have made major improvements in the last few years.  The building being used as an office is not anything spectacular by any means but it is helping save lives.  Common ailments that used to be the cause of death of young children are now treatable and children are able to live past their fifth birthday.  This is a big deal for the people in Ethiopia.  This is not any expensive program brought in by the United States, but a government run program created in Ethiopia.  Common remedies are given to children as well as vaccines that are carefully documented for who needs what and when by the people that run the facilities.  Although the program is still improving and it may take a long time for it to become top notch, the improvement that has been because of this is stellar for the circumstances.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:58 PM

Mortality rates have become overwhelmingly high in many countries. Ethiopia has now found simple health remedies to improve these rates. Many of these poor countries do not have numerous resources or even medication to help them when they are sick. Ethiopia used to have one of the highest child mortality rate in the world. one of the statistics given was very alarming and it stated ""If you were a kid born in 1990 [in Ethiopia], you had a 1 in 5 chance of not surviving to your fifth birthday." This is horrific for children who cannot predict where they are born and raised. Since 1990, Ethiopia has improved that rate by 60%. They havented invested a lot of money but have opened basic clinics with community individuals who are minimumally educated on these matters. Many of these workers have gone through a one-year training but nothing fancy. Many of these clinics have even two rooms and no electricity. Many of these children are finally being treated properly for some basic things that shouldn't be taking their lives. There is a long way to go for improvemnet but as long as their is a will to help these children, this country will vastly improve.

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WaterWheel to ease burden on women | Mark Tran

WaterWheel to ease burden on women | Mark Tran | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Mark Tran: Round 50-litre container enables water collectors to roll liquid from wells rather than carry it on their heads
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Development, NGO, women

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India has the lowest workforce participation rate of women among the BRICS

India has the lowest workforce participation rate of women among the BRICS | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nearly 400 million people live in cities in India and during the next 40 years that number will more than double. Not only is the proportion of India’s total female population that is economically active among the lowest in the world, but urban areas do even worse. New analysis of data from the 2011 census shows only...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Culture, gender, women in India

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