Mrs. Watson's Class
Follow
Find tag "Immigration"
13.7K views | +0 today
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons

U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Both Hispanics and Asians been among the fastest-growing racial/ethnic groups in recent years, but since 2010, number of Asians have increased at a faster rate.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 27, 2014 10:15 AM

It is often noted that the cultural composition of the United States is undergoing a shift, referred to by some as the "Browning of America."  The story of Asian and Hispanic growth in the United States are occurring simultaneously, which makes many assume that they are growing for the same reasons.  The data clearly shows that this is not the case.  


Tags: migration, USA, ethnicity.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:55 PM

APHG-U2

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 9:46 PM

A very interesting fact, because I thought that Hispanic race had grown rather than Asian race in the last few years but I see that not. Another thing that caught my attention was that the Hispanic  population has  growth due to the Hispanic  birth here in U.S and not because they immigrate to U.S. But in the case of the growth of the Asian population, is because they immigrate. I didn't know that, now I am more  informed.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Is not a surprise that illegal immigrants have been decreasing since 2007, because the economy crisis and the borders.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:34 PM

Immigration has been an ongoing issue and the problem of border hopping doesn't make it any better. Of course numbers are going to vary from year to year. This article discusses where US immigrants come from and how the immigration changes over time. In 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they mostly come from Asia and Africa. Also, these statistics are only based off of legal immigrations. We cant forget the ones that just hop the border in their free time. As stated in the article, it has been estimated that there are about 11.1 million illegal immigrants in the United States. A majority of them come from Latin America and the Caribbean. With that being said, legal immigrants still make up the biggest chunk of the foreign population in the United States and the population only continues to grow.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Syrian refugees update 2013

Syrian refugees update 2013 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Another refugee camp opened today in Mrajeeb al-Fhood, Jordan, to accommodate the reported 1,500 to 2,000 Syrians fleeing to Jordan daily.  Just over a year ago the Big Picture posted an entry of the growing number of people displaced due to the conflict that now has lasted over two years. The United Nations recently said a total of around 7,000 to 8,000 Syrians are leaving their country daily; there are 1.3 million Syrian refugees and almost 4 million more have been displaced inside Syria since the start of the conflict. Posted here is another glimpse of daily life for those displaced since the beginning of this year." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MAANDO_PROTOTYPE's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:19 PM

http://syria-freedom-2014.tumblr.com/
FREEDOM GRAFFiTi WEEK Syria ... MAANDO...PROTOTYPE
#Syria #MAANDO #PROTOTYPE #SYRIAN

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:13 PM

Conflicts in Syria have led almost 4 million refugees to displace to Jordan. Refugee camps have been set up to aid these families the best ways possible. although conditions are still tough, they are much safer than in Syria. These photos embrace the combinations of struggle and joy. Children cry and children play. Families create homes within the tents and make due with what they have.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:21 PM

It’s great to know the many good things people are trying to do to protect some of their citizens. When looking at the pictures, there obviously wasn’t much of a home aspect to their living situation but it’s great to know that they seem to be happier where they are now to where they were before. The picture with the Syrian refugee little boy shaking hands with an Emirati Red Crescent is priceless. The smile on that little boys face touched me and I could feel the happiness with his smile. The facts that the citizens have a choice to leave for a better environment is great and knowing there is a happier ending for them is great. The picture with the kids playing and smiling is also great. As a student going to school to become an elementary school teacher it’s astonishing in the happiness these kids get from playing with nothing. Very different to how children are raised here in the US. But great to know how there happiness can one day be restored since leaving.

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | News | National Post

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | News | National Post | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Canadian immigration takes on a new spatial layout with ethnic enclaves that spread across greater areas and making a distinct imprint on the cultural landscape

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?

 

This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 

 

Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 

 

Tags:  migration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Here's Why There Are So Many German-Americans In The US

Here's Why There Are So Many German-Americans In The US | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The largest ancestry group there is.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Is not a surprise that illegal immigrants have been decreasing since 2007, because the economy crisis and the borders.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:34 PM

Immigration has been an ongoing issue and the problem of border hopping doesn't make it any better. Of course numbers are going to vary from year to year. This article discusses where US immigrants come from and how the immigration changes over time. In 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they mostly come from Asia and Africa. Also, these statistics are only based off of legal immigrations. We cant forget the ones that just hop the border in their free time. As stated in the article, it has been estimated that there are about 11.1 million illegal immigrants in the United States. A majority of them come from Latin America and the Caribbean. With that being said, legal immigrants still make up the biggest chunk of the foreign population in the United States and the population only continues to grow.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean?

Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
With the highest unemployment rate in the U.S. and a mountain of debt, the island is facing a declining population. But those who stay insist they're there for the long haul.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 10:18 PM

If this is the Greece of the Caribbean I wonder how long the US will hold on to PR?  I don't know many who want to hold onto a sinking ship.  I can remember when the unemployment rate in RI was about 13%.  That was scary and PR is up to 14%.  They need to find a way to manufacture or produce something they can sell instead of buying items to sell from the Mainland.  They need a self sustaining economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:52 AM

It's clear from the transcript and even more so from the comments that the root of economic woes in Puerto Rico is corruption. Corruption of the economy through the black market, kindly referred to as the "informal economy", pet projects such as the rail system that cost 2.2B dollars and serves only 12 miles, and the lack of education. Citizens of this island pseudo nation are leaving to pursue other opportunities not available to them in their native country. The US may want to infuse dollars into their economy to build a university and foster reading academies that teach young children to read. If they don't turn around the brain drain soon, this island paradise will not have a happy ending.Also, additional dollars could be allocated to the tourism industry to increase revenue for the island.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 6:23 PM

I chose this article with the Somalia Refugee BBC pod cast on my mind. The pull factors for leaving a country are always obvious to me. Once again, there is a poor economy that isn't able to provide enough economic opportunity for its citizens. Also, there is an increase in crime that worries the population. Both of these reasons harm the future of citizens and as I mentioned in the Somalia article, leaving an area that provides little hope for a good future just makes sense.    

 

What I don't understand is why someone stays in an area when the pulls to leave are so strong. As I said in the Somalia article, I thought staying was because of a sense of duty. Yet, I am finding from the grandmother mentioned in this piece that pride is another factor. It seems like her pride isn't causing her to fix the problems rather the pride just makes her stay. It is almost like in gentrification where the new project will probably be better for the economy of the area (at least that is often the intent), but people are just too emotionally attached to want change. They really should given the cost benefits, but they don't. So I think I have issues grasping both of these reasons to stay because I have always analyzed a situation from a logical lens rather than an emotional one. 

 

Another aspect of the article that caught my attention was the comparison to Greece. As we learned about during the section on the EU, Greece's economy. The United States isn't entangled in PR's economy in quite the same manner as the EU is with Greece. However, the article did mention how their are American citizens with investments in this area. So if Puerto Rico's economy does fail, just how much of an impact would this have on the United States and the rest of the global economy? 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.

 

The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.

 

Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.