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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, July 7, 3:43 AM

¿movilidad urbana?  -¿algo habrá que gestionar aquí?

 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 7:45 AM

seth dixon:This is an excellent article to explore some of the problems confronting megacities.

Jade ten Kate's curator insight, July 9, 10:01 PM

Megacities

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Dhaka, Bangladesh 

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2:37 PM

It is sad that for the poor people moving to Dhaka, living in a slum is considered an improvement. The more people that move to the city the more polluted it becomes. How long until it is no longer able to support all this growth and the city collapses?

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Walled World

Walled World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 6:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 10:06 PM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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Video: The Deadly Cost of Fashion

A photojournalist who covered last year’s deadly collapse of the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh draws connections to New York from clothing labels he found in the rubble.
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What do we know about where and how our clothes and other goods are produced?

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Facing Rising Seas, Bangladesh Confronts the Consequences of Climate Change

Facing Rising Seas, Bangladesh Confronts the Consequences of Climate Change | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Though countries like Bangladesh have contributed little to the industrial pollution driving climate change, they will suffer the most from the devastating consequences.
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Bangladesh is dangerously close to sea level. There have been disastrous floods, but rising sea levels are an enduring threat. 

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 11:44 AM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.