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The amazing, surprising, Africa-driven demographic future of the Earth, in 9 charts

The amazing, surprising, Africa-driven demographic future of the Earth, in 9 charts | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The world is poised to change dramatically over the next century, and in ways that you might not expect.
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8 Maps That Will Change the Way You Look at Africa

8 Maps That Will Change the Way You Look at Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Expansion of population and investment on the continent represent both enormous opportunity and potential for crises and injustice.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Africa, a geography lesson. It is a continent, not a country.  Larger than many expect and full of diversity.

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8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist

8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Africa has one of the youngest and fastest-growing consumer markets in the world.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Africa is a continent to watch. It has the potential to begin an economic break through on a global scale. I used to say watch China. Now I think it is Africa 

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Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Across sub-Saharan Africa, consumer demand is fueling the continent’s economies in new ways, driving hopes that Africa will emerge as a success story.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Core countries "mass consumption" and desire for cheap goods may help pull Africa forward.

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The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030

The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
New York, Osaka, and Sao Paulo won't even make the top 10.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Good article for the Urban Unit. Mega cities of the world are growing in Asia and Africa as some MDC are seeing a decline in population and more slowly growing cities.

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:54 AM

Looks like English colonist did a better job. Is weird to see Spanish placed in that location, when "spain" is very close to the northwest dominated by Arabic.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:53 PM

This map shows the different languages that are used for business dealings in Africa. It is interesting to see that Africa itself has many languages, but not one of them is predominantly used. The two languages that are mainly used in Africa are English and French, with  Arabic, Portuguese, Spanish and a combination of Arabic and French used in Mauritania, while English and French is used in Madagascar.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Jacquez
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:35 PM

This is amazing!  Although Ethiopia still has a long way to go in the medical field they have made major improvements in the last few years.  The building being used as an office is not anything spectacular by any means but it is helping save lives.  Common ailments that used to be the cause of death of young children are now treatable and children are able to live past their fifth birthday.  This is a big deal for the people in Ethiopia.  This is not any expensive program brought in by the United States, but a government run program created in Ethiopia.  Common remedies are given to children as well as vaccines that are carefully documented for who needs what and when by the people that run the facilities.  Although the program is still improving and it may take a long time for it to become top notch, the improvement that has been because of this is stellar for the circumstances.

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125 years of the Berlin Conference

125 years of the Berlin Conference | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
THE BERLIN CONFERENCEThere is no single event in modern African history whose consequences have been as dire for the continent as the Berlin Conference of 1884-85, reports New African.
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

Via Seth Dixon
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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Aging populations in LDCs? Modern medicine and education at work

 

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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This Graphic Of Africa's Actual Size Will Blow Your Mind

This Graphic Of Africa's Actual Size Will Blow Your Mind | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Africa is bigger than China, India, Europe, and the USA. COMBINED.
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'Epidemic of ignorance': Tourists avoid Africa, all of it

'Epidemic of ignorance': Tourists avoid Africa, all of it | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Jake McCormick's phone is unusually silent. October should be a busy time for the safari specialist scheduling holiday getaways, but because of Ebola - almost no one is booking a trip to Africa.
Nancy Watson's insight:

The picture is sad, but true to nature. The story makes the case for more geography education and more research in factual reporting.  

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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

A modern day health threat that makes me think of the plague. They didn't know what caused the plague or how to stop it. Wonder when we will figure out how to handle Ebola.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:07 PM

A good resource that gives a general outline of the recent Ebola outbreak and its effects on the world. The outbreak comes from a border region with a very weak infrastructure and poor population, which has allowed for Ebola to spread like wildfire. The poor economic state of the area has let Ebola wreak havoc, and the modern level of globalization has allowed for the virus to spread out into the world. We see how Ebola has developed and spread throughout Western Africa, and when compared to American outbreak situation it highlights the deep differences in the capabilities of core and periphery countries.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:11 PM

It's almost ironic that the Western World has chosen to wait so long to get involved and now because of it's spread fear has begun that Ebola might travel to the United States. By not sending aid in a timely fashion the US has allowed the virus to grow to a point that now the US finds itself in danger. To make a historical comparison it's almost akin to the Munich Agreements, France and England chose not to stop a growing and dangerous Germany out of fear of conflict only to find war on their door steps because of it. Why did the western world wait so long? Euro-centric bias or racism? Short sightedness? Regardless of the reason the United States and Western Europe are at risk from a nearly untreatable disease primarily through negligence.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:23 PM

This article shows how the Ebola virus began to spread in many of the countries on Africa and how likely the virus will arrive in the United States. The virus has crossed many borders in Africa already and, according to the article, has infected five people in the United States, but has been quarantined and is currently being treated.  The Ebola virus outbreak has shown how ill equipped certain parts of the world are, in terms of, having the necessary tools for combating a deadly disease. For example, the article provides a map that shows the areas in Africa are more infected with Ebola than others, illustrating how certain parts of the country are becoming more susceptible to the outbreak than others. So geographically, the Ebola virus has gone from a regional outbreak into a potentially global epidemic, what with the cases in the United States.

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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

This is a good practice.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 10:50 AM

APHG-Maps

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 22, 2014 10:38 PM

Practice for map review

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 18, 2014 11:52 PM

This is a easy way to learn more about Africa. I am going to be honest, I did not get any of the question right, but I like because after you make your guess, it show you the right answer. I am going to keep trying, this is a good way to learn more about Africa's geography.....

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The New Scramble for Africa

The New Scramble for Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Thought colonialism was over? Our new interactive infographic shows how corporations like Monsanto are scrambling to carve up Africa's food system: http://wdm.li/newscramble
Nancy Watson's insight:

Ah times change, but motives do not.

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 22, 2014 10:44 PM

Development/Agriculture Unit

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‘China’s Second Continent,’ by Howard W. French

‘China’s Second Continent,’ by Howard W. French | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than a million Chinese pioneers have built new lives in Africa.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Imperialism? investment?  Opportunity ? For  Chinese? For Africa?

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The dividend is delayed

The dividend is delayed | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
HOW unusual is Africa’s demography? If you take a selection of countries, from Algeria and Tunisia in the north to Botswana and South Africa in the south, you may...
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Zoe Klein's curator insight, February 5, 12:22 AM

Who ? 

 

The Economist, article from the printed edition (no mention of the author's name) 

 

When ? 

 

6 March 2014 

 

Where ?

 

Africa

 

What ? 

 

The article starts off by mentioning a study on Africa's demography. Once again, the issue comes down to the need for governments to invest in family-planning. Indeed, if too many children are born, some places (cities) will become impossible to manage. Although a young population means a large workforce, Africa has such a large number of young people to take care of that it can go from being an asset economically speaking to being a burden. 

The author mentions the predictions the UN had made concerning the future of the African fertility rates. Most of them are falling, although they are falling slower than it had been expected by the UN. Even though things are changing at the time, 78% of Africa's population still lives in countries where the fall of fertility rates is nowhere near finished. This tells us a lot about the lack of control from governments notably regarding family-panning. African countries lack the power to educate all these young people, yet it lacks the contraceptive methods needed to slow the population growth. If the population growth is not stopped, the economy will pay the price of stagnating instead of growing as it could if Africa entered a state of demographic dividend. 

This article also mentions the concept of urbanization, which proves to be a recurrent issue. Added to the unmanageable future overly populated cities of 2050, is, again, the issue of education. With "only a quarter of young African men and just 10% of young African women manage to get jobs in the formal economy before they reach the age of 30", the huge part of the people having precarious jobs shows that the high population is a risk to the economy. 

This article mentions China, as China and Africa are known to have agreements, economic ones. The issue is that Africa relies a lot on China, and apparently more than vice-versa: thus, even though Africa is supposed to provide raw materials to China, the demand of those seems to be lowering. 

Like other article, this one comes to the conclusion of the need to have more family-planning in Africa, as it is a rather cheap and effective solution. 

 

Why ? 

 

This article does retell things I had read before, but I enjoyed the fact that it was extremely comprehensive and that it did provide me with a lot of data. Furthermore, it holds a different gait than the others: I found that it compared Africa more to the rest of the world, and there was a mention of international trade between China and Africa, which is also becoming a problem. 

 

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Gambia president rejects English language

Gambia president rejects English language | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
President's decision to shift official language from English to local language comes months after its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:49 PM

Gambian president wants his nation to have a sense of identity. Conforming to the English language and making that the primary language of the country has set a drawback on what he wants his country to be. He says they should speak their local language and that to be a leader you don't have to speak English. I think speaking the local language is a great idea but also knowing the English language is very beneficial.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:14 AM

culturally it would be a good idea to switch the official language to a local language that way their langueages dont become dead languages but economically its not a good idea because Americas dominate language is English and it is also an economic power.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:25 PM

Gambia does not want the English language to be the official language that is spoken anymore.  Noting that it reflects the UK and they don't believe that they and the UK have much in common especially on the platform of human rights.  Cutting the English language as the official language continues to cut ties with the UK.  One of the problems with this is if there are multiple local languages spoken in Gambia which one are they going to choose as the official language.  With this more problems are presented, those that do not know the local language that is chosen to be official will have to learn the new language quickly if they want to have any idea as to what is going on in their own country.

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:35 PM

This is amazing!  Although Ethiopia still has a long way to go in the medical field they have made major improvements in the last few years.  The building being used as an office is not anything spectacular by any means but it is helping save lives.  Common ailments that used to be the cause of death of young children are now treatable and children are able to live past their fifth birthday.  This is a big deal for the people in Ethiopia.  This is not any expensive program brought in by the United States, but a government run program created in Ethiopia.  Common remedies are given to children as well as vaccines that are carefully documented for who needs what and when by the people that run the facilities.  Although the program is still improving and it may take a long time for it to become top notch, the improvement that has been because of this is stellar for the circumstances.

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This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa

This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This graph is worth as many as you can take out of it.
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.