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A Statistical Portrait of U.S. Hispanics

A Statistical Portrait of U.S. Hispanics | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

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Farm tech: GPS, GIS play increasing role at local farm operations

Farm tech: GPS, GIS play increasing role at local farm operations | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Farm tech: GPS, GIS play increasing role at local farm operationsSturgis JournalThe day is coming when farmers won't have to spend time driving tractors to do field work.

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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:00 AM

This video does have a political bent that may or may not reflect your views, but it nicely lays out data that graphically represents the economic differences that we see in the United States today.  Our perception is as skewed as what is and what we think it should be.  

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:36 PM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

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Ecology of Plastic Bags

Ecology of Plastic Bags | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2013 12:44 PM

Tags: pollution, infographic, ecology.

Mariela Guzmán's curator insight, April 17, 2013 2:07 PM

What do you think about these images?Do you you agree?or not?

Caroline Sara Chateau's curator insight, August 24, 2013 11:08 AM

really interesting infograph please have a look on it, will warn and make you think about the pollution that plastic bags cause.

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Catholic Demographics

Catholic Demographics | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Infographics showing the distribution of the Roman Catholic population in the world, where it has risen and fallen in recent years.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 12:29 PM

As the Roman Catholic population decreases in Europe, it drastically increases in Africa. However, Latin America still holds the largest population of Catholics according to the Vatican.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 10:33 PM

This infographic shows the changing world Catholic demographic. South America is home to by far the largest Catholic population in the world where once Europe was. Now Europe has a rapidly declining Catholic population over the past 40 years (probably due to declining religiosity and low birth rates) while Africa, particularly in DR Congo, is seeing the most rapid increase in Catholics (likely due to missionaries and converts). Interestingly, there's a growing number of Catholics in Asia, possibly due to missionaries or just migration.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 7:37 PM

This is a distribution map, showing how Catholicism is spread throughout the world. It is a choropleth map and a bar graph on the side.

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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:49 AM

A very insightful video into the organic farming movement. Chipotle is taking a leap into spreading the word about this, and personally I find it enlightening. It is nice to see such a widely known restaurant take in interest in the food they serve and it makes it seem like they care about their customers. When you eat at Chiptole, you know what you are eating, but with other fast food places you can't be sure exactly what went into making that hamburger. They want people to see that they can get organic food made fast and it still tastes good. Chipotle is starting a consumption cultural revolution. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:57 PM

This video, although it is a Chipotle Grill advertisment, does make a clear point. The industrialization of agriculture has made our food unhealthy and has taken away jobs from the farmer. Although we are a highly industrialized and developed nation today, it is still necessary for our necessary food to be naturally grown on farms rather than in factories where it was not meant to be grown. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:13 AM

What this commercial is trying to make aware is that there are ethics involved in agriculture. What the organic farming movement is all about is providing good for people that is produced fresh and no harm is done to the animals or environment .

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Deadly air: the smog shrouding China's future

Deadly air: the smog shrouding China's future | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Beijing has been smothered by a dense and dangerous smog this month, which has set new air pollution records over several days.The World Health Organization advises that the acceptable level of fine…

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Redefining the language of geospatial industry

Redefining the language of geospatial industry | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Redefining the language of geospatial industry

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What Republicans Are Really Up Against: Population Density - Atlantic Cities

What Republicans Are Really Up Against: Population Density - Atlantic Cities | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

To win in 2016, the party needs to revamp their stance on urban policies.

 

Check out the graph on population density and red vs. blue states.  Obama clearly won in areas with the highest population density, aka cities.


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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 10:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

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Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography

Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

This is a great gallery of clever artwork that puts the "art" in cartography (The Earth without art is just "eh"). 


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Geographic Information Systems Help Scholars See History

Geographic Information Systems Help Scholars See History | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Many-layered mapmaking is helping scholars recreate vanished landscapes and envision history.
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A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money

A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

NP: Four years ago, Channel One News, the weekday news program for middle and high school kids featured a dynamic area cartogram as a way of making the point that some states have much more electoral weight than others. In that broadcast, the map of the United States, featuring the familiar red and blue states indicating presidential election results, became animated. States with smaller populations squeezed into tiny shapes, while states with large populations expanded. At the time, we didn't know this kind of map was called an area cartogram; we called it a "squishy map." It does a nice job of making this case: some states matter more than others when it comes to US presidential elections.

 

Seeing the map on Channel One also launched me into work that continues with my dissertation. What kind of sense do kids make from complex representations like an area cartogram? In the Channel One broadcast in 2008, the map was presented as part of a sensible lesson about "electoral weight." With Vanderbilt professors Rogers Hall and Kevin Leander, we wondered if the map made sense to kids and if the argument was strengthened by the map.

 

Four years later, I'm still working on those questions and others like them. In the mean time, here's another awesome area cartogram. In this case, NPR's "It's All Politics" blogger Adam Cole makes an argument about the advertisement spending of superPACs and other outside groups. Which states matter to these groups? And how much do they spend per voter on these ads? The squishy maps tell the story. Cole has a great video here as well--it's whimsical and informative. Finally, another move by Cole in these maps is the scaling of elections at the level of the state by popular vote. This means that states that are more contested turn purple (half blue and half red) rather than the color of the winning candidate from the last election.

 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:28 AM
All the states blown up in size are the deciding factors in this years election as usual, this map is an interesting way to look at things. It's still crazy to me that this is how our voting system works and that some states dominate the others.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:32 AM
This map is perfect for young voters. It uses visuals to show how important states like Ohio and Florida are during the election. It shows people why the candidates are always spending campaign money on these swing states and not states like Massachusetts, Rhode Island, etc. In states like these, Republican voters almost don't even matter because the two states are so democratic. The electoral votes automatically make the state blue. The same goes with strictly Republican states like Texas or Oklahoma.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 9:56 PM
I found this article to be very informative, it represented information to those who aren't familiar with the facts of an election. It demonstrated that it isnt the size of a state that matter it is the electoral vote that counts, therefore regardless a state is so large it may not count as much in electoral votes as a smaller state. It also explained how bigger states need to spend more money because they are the states needing to get their point across and making a larger difference.
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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:41 PM

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

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Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:18 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 10:00 AM

Unit 5

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Locusts: Agricultural Menace and Kosher Snack - PRI

Locusts: Agricultural Menace and Kosher Snack - PRI | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

Who knew?  If you can't beat them, then eat them!  Get your recipe here!


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EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

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How To Find A Food Desert Near You : NPR

How To Find A Food Desert Near You : NPR | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
A new clickable atlas shows just how far it is to the grocery store, everywhere in the United States. "Food deserts" are the focus of state, local and federal anti-obesity efforts.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 14, 2013 7:14 AM

Search this map to see a correlation between lack of access to fresh food and diet-related illnesses and conditions.

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People Movin'

People Movin' | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:09 PM

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 9:20 AM
Perfect!
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Fake boyfriends to rent for Chinese New Year

Fake boyfriends to rent for Chinese New Year | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Chinese women turn to hiring 'fake boyfriends' to make the holidays more bearable.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 7, 2013 12:58 PM

One part of the largest human migration event on the planet that takes place during Chinese New Year is for millions of Chinese to go "home" for the holiday to see their families.  For young women, the parents are hopeful that their daughters have found a potential husband.  For those who don't have that special someone yet, they can rent a fake boyfriend to take with them to meet the folks. 

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Hans Rosling: Religions and babies | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? Speaking at the TEDxSummit in Doha, Qatar, he graphs data over time and across religions.

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China profile

China profile | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

China is simply to important to ignore and this profile is a good primer for students unfamiliar with the East Asian country to get caught up to speed. 


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Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:23 PM
China has a huge population but is has a horrible life style. It
Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:25 PM
China has a huge population but it has a horrible life style. It's really bad when people have to protest for human rights. Even though their economy has boosted their pollution problems are unexceptable.
Joel Roberts's comment, May 3, 2013 2:37 PM
China's huge population growth isn't necessarily such a good thing because most of the new population is males because parents want males so they can have more workers after they get married but its harder to get married because there is less and less girls in China's population.
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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  This is truly an amazingly tool to visualize the extent of environmental degradation in Central Asia. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:14 PM

See how much the Aral Sea has changed due to the impact of humans on their environment for yourself. Drag the slider tool to see a before and after. Reference your textbook (p61) for the whole story.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 12:46 PM

This map is a true testament to the people who believe human activity does not affect the earth. Humans have been transforming Earth’s surface for years, through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate. Much of the transformation taking place in the Aral sea leads to its connection to the Soviet era and their lack of understanding of the environment. This mismanagement of the Aral Sea is leading to a lack of water for the people who live in Central Asia.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:30 AM

The colors seen in photographs and images like this is because of the equipment used. Sometimes the quality of the equipment makes the pictures look different than they actually are. This basin has dried up over time and its surface has signs of significant change.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.