Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography
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As American as Peanut Butter

As American as Peanut Butter | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

During the Great Depression, peanut butter sandwiches were handed out in food lines. It was a low-cost, beneficially caloric meal—exactly what people needed. “It’s the Depression that makes the PB&J the core of childhood food,” says Andrew F. Smith, food historian. “It is one of those things that will bind children together regardless of nationality and ethnic group.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 25, 2014 1:07 PM

When I travel abroad, I see that others view widespread American consumption of peanut butter as perplexing.  It was during the Depression that many regions, ethnic groups and age cohorts were introduced to peanut butter and being a child friendly food only enhanced it's adoption as a food aid item. 


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Africa in Transition » Kidnapped Girls Galvanize Nigerian Public

Africa in Transition » Kidnapped Girls Galvanize Nigerian Public | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The kidnapping of more than two hundred schools girls, and the security services’ inability to find and free them, appears ...

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America's fastest shrinking cities

America's fastest shrinking cities | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The U.S. population rose by just 0.72% in 2013, the lowest growth rate in more than 70 years. Not only has the country become less-attractive to immigrants than in years past, with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year, but also the U.S.'s domestic birth rate has dropped to a multi-decade low.

While the population of most of the country's metro areas grew at a low pace in recent years, in a small number of metro areas the population actually shrank. Looking at the most recent years, the U.S. population rose by just 2.4% between April 2010 and July 2013, but in 30 metro areas the population shrank by at least 1%. The population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, fell a nation-leading 4.4% in that time. Based on recently released U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined the cities with shrinking populations."


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How Should Crimea Be Shown on National Geographic Maps?

How Should Crimea Be Shown on National Geographic Maps? | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Friday's Russian parliamentary vote on annexation will determine the decision on the map of Crimea, says the Geographer of the National Geographic Society.

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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This Professor Is OK With Growing GM Crops In Africa

This Professor Is OK With Growing GM Crops In Africa | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Sub-Saharan African countries have been slow to adopt modern agricultural tools like GM seeds. To date, commercial GM crops can only be planted in three countries on the continent....

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China in Africa: investment or exploitation?

China in Africa: investment or exploitation? | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Premier Li Keqiang shrugs off problems as "growing pains" and says relationship is based on equality and mutual benefit.

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10 Fastest Emerging Global Cities

10 Fastest Emerging Global Cities | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Cities in lower-income countries are rapidly catching up with the world's top business capitals, according to a new report.


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China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 2014 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

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Palestine as an exclusively Jewish issue in the US

Palestine as an exclusively Jewish issue in the US | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Are Palestinians only relevant by what they mean to Israel, instead of how they are related to the bigger picture?

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Saudi Arabia criticises Norway over human rights record

Saudi Arabia criticises Norway over human rights record | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia has criticised Norway's human rights record, accusing the country of failing to protect its Muslim citizens and not doing enough to counter criticism of the prophet Mohammed.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 30, 2014 10:35 AM

If we are going to criticize Norway for their cultural values, I think that my main problem with Norway is that they've exported their culture globally and have force the world to listen to the song, "What Does the Fox Say?" I could think of a few other countries that I would be prepared to listen to on the subject of religious tolerance before Saudi Arabia. 

Albert Jordan's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:53 PM

It goes to show that within the UN, many countries that have a seat on relevant and influential councils, are only there as a favor and to make them feel important because they are needed for something else. While every country may have some blemishes on their human rights record, as far as modern times go - Saudi Arabia is probably one of the last countries that should be saying another country needs to change.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:24 PM

This really shows how each country has its own opinion based on personal beliefs.

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Sports Movies and Globalization

Hamm said he was drawn to the true story of an agent looking for India's first pro-baseball player

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:16 PM

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals). 


Tags: sport, globalization, popular culture, economic, labor, India.

Nicky Mohan's curator insight, May 5, 2014 6:31 PM

There's an absolute treasure trove of not only movies but also games that are very powerful for educational purposes. It is something that students can relate to. It is relevant & interesting.

Jyoti Chouhan's curator insight, May 13, 2014 1:45 PM

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals).

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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


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Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:31 PM

This slide show teaches you what primate cities are and gives you an example and background of one. It teaches you about Mexico City and the characteristics of it. 

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it teaches you about primate cities. Primate cities have disproportionately large populations and is over two times larger than the next largest city in the country

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:10 AM

This power point shows the negative and positive factors accounting for Mexico City being a Primate city. 

 

The pp gives insight on how Primate cities such as Mexico have a disproportionally large population, resulting in an unbalanced economy.

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 7:45 AM

Mexico City is a primate city, since it's population is significantly larger than any other city in Mexico. Primate cities are only deemed primate cities if they are double or more the population of the running up city.

Primate cities show population distribution since a large majority of the population is centralized around one area.

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:52 PM

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

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A Tangle of Conflicts: The Dirty Business of Palm Oil

A Tangle of Conflicts: The Dirty Business of Palm Oil | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Palm oil can be found in many of the products we consume each day. Much of it comes from Indonesia, where brutal methods are deployed against locals. One of the main suppliers says it is cleaning up its act, but has it really changed?

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Kenya redefines marriage in a blow to women’s rights

Kenya redefines marriage in a blow to women’s rights | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A push by Kenya’s president and male-dominated parliament to overhaul marriage bodes ill for the nation’s wives, socially and economically.

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Two soccer teams, one blurring border | Al Jazeera America

Two soccer teams, one blurring border | Al Jazeera America | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Battle for players and fans between L.A. and Tijuana reflects cultural reality where the US and Mexico meet

 

At some point this month, Hispanics are set to become the largest racial or ethnic group in California for the first time, according to a report from the state’s Department of Finance. The same report also said that by 2060 Hispanics will be by far the largest group represented in the U.S. workforce, redrawing the map of American labor.

But California soccer fans could have told bureaucrats that the maps started being redrawn some time ago. As the global game has steadily infiltrated North America it has brought about demographic changes of its own. And in Southern California, in particular, the stage is set for a protracted battle for fans and players and, long term, perhaps the heart of American sports.


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For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die'

For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die' | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Thousands of Muslims in the Central African Republic have fled as UN chief warns of 'ethno-religious cleansing'.

 

Leave or die.  It's come down to this for the Muslims of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic.  Muslims here once lived freely among the Christian majority, running businesses and praying in mosques. Now, many of the city's Muslims have fled, and on Sunday about 1,300 Muslims from Bangui's PK12 neighbourhood were evacuated to safety by peacekeeping forces.

Already one of the world's poorest countries, CAR has seen a wave of upheaval and violence in the past 15 months. The 10-month reign of the Muslim-dominated Seleka rebel group inflamed intercommunal tensions in the country, and spurred the rise of Christian militias called the anti-Balaka.  Once the Seleka was forced out of power in January, the anti-Balaka rampaged, targeting Muslims across the country for their perceived support of the Seleka and its bloody excesses.


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David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 11:24 AM

This article does a good job discussing the ongoing issues in the Central African Republic. Its horrible to see a religious cleansing taking place at this point in time. One would think religious cleansing by the sword has diminished (perhaps it has in historical terms) but it is still very much alive throughout the world. What's interesting is how once religion is mixed with politics it seems bloodshed always ensues. The changing of presidents reflects the changing of "what group" controls the country/region... 

CAR is located within the struggling Sahel region. Yes, there are ecological/environmental issues that plague the Sahel region and the people whom inhabit it but the region also proposes an intense societal issue. This is the region where Arab Africa meets Black Africa, thus two distinct groups of people with two different faiths. Due to conflicts in neighboring countries, as exemplified in the article through Chad, disruption has led to Arab peoples fleeing South. The displacement of these people has led to a growing muslim population in Christian dominated Central African Republic. Once political order is involved there is always one group of people in charge. The changing of societal leaders has now led to a 15 month disruption which has now evolved into a religious ethnic cleansing. 

The Sahel region is only going to get worse. There is an issue with the climate which is affecting both the people and landscape. There is now a clash of cultures/religions. These two issues are ultimately going to clash. Not only will Christians and Arabs kill each other due to political structure and treatment of each others people but perhaps disputes over fertile land, clean water, droughts, etc... will also lead to conflict. This region of the world is in a tough predicament. The clashing of peoples is not going to improve the situation. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:36 PM

The picture is ironic because the one guy in the white tank top is holding up a peace sign and the other is threatening to slit your throat.  Oxymoronic?  I guess you could see it as a V for victory.  Not really sure.  This comes down to an eye for an eye.  The Christians and Muslims will kill each other till one group comes out on top.  I guess historically we learned nothing from the Reformation.  At one point you couldn't be Protestant, then you couldn't be Catholic.  Religious persecution should not be occurring today.  What a waste of human life.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:14 PM

Though the Central African Republic is a country that not many people have heard of, it seems that it suffers from some of the same problems that any other country does. CAR is home to a large Christian population, though there is a Muslim minority present within the country. The past two years have seen a Muslim rebel group called Seleka perpetrate a violent reign throughout the country, which in turn has given rise to opposition Christian groups called the anti-Balaka. After the Seleka were toppled from power, the anti-Balaka took out their fear and frustration on the country's Muslim population for perceived support of the Seleka. The anti-Balaka murdered Muslims brutally and indiscriminately, causing many Muslims in CAR to either flee or come together in enclaves for protection and support. 

 

This kind of religious persecution is unfortunately nothing new. The Jews have experienced religious persecution for thousands of years and Muslims were on the receiving end of some particularly brutal persecution during the Crusades. It seems that regardless of the time or place, religious tensions are always present and one religion or another is always ready to persecute the other for their differences, real or perceived. This is a global pattern, not unique to any one country, region, or culture. It is an unfortunate but telling one, as it highlights the tendency of human beings to be at odds with one another over any differences. The situation in CAR is representative of a larger problem of intolerance that may never seen an end. 

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Japan banned from Antarctic whaling

Japan banned from Antarctic whaling | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The UN's International Court of Justice rules that Japan must temporarily halt its whaling programme in the Antarctic.

 

It agreed with Australia, which brought the case in May 2010, that the  programme was not for scientific research as claimed by Tokyo. Japan said it would abide by the decision but added it "regrets and is deeply  disappointed by the decision". Australia argued that the programme was commercial whaling in disguise. The court's decision is considered legally binding. Japan had argued that the suit brought by Australia was an attempt to impose its cultural norms on Japan.


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The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"People choose to live in some pretty baffling places, like those towns sitting at the base of volcanos or the precariously placed monasteries in the Himalayan mountains. Here’s one that looks like it might have been hit by a meteor and residents just decided to carry on as usual…Welcome to the town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain, where around 3,000 inhabitants are living quite literally, under a rock."


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dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 2014 6:38 PM

An extreme example of the built environment working with the natural one. I don't think, however, that I'd be able to sleep well with this very visible weight hanging over my head! 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:56 PM

these places are so beautiful! We forget how beautiful the natural environment really is.

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Roadside reminder: Time doesn't stand still

Roadside reminder: Time doesn't stand still | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

WALTERSBURG — "A rusting steam shovel from a bygone era has sat guarding an old strip mine along Route 51 in this Fayette County village for as long as anyone can remember. For at least 60 years, some say; even longer, say others. [The roadside memorial to the steam shovel has an] allure that crosses generations, somehow magically capturing the imagination of people passing by long after its original usefulness ended."


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Coast to Coast: Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons

Coast to Coast:  Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The history of baseball reflects the story of expansion in the United States. New cities have emerged and modern stadiums have been built as a growing population fueled the popularity of our National Pastime. The result is an extensive network of baseball teams at every level - from the major leagues to the little leagues - that represent the communities and environments in which they play. Everything from jersey colors, names, and symbols to the foods served at ballparks reflects the local landscape and culture of baseball teams. A simple game that began with a bat and ball is now a comprehensive case study of how people and geography are interrelated.

 
All of the lessons and activities have been prepared to accompany "Geography: Baseball Coast to Coast." You will find that the curriculum is organized into three levels: Level 1 for elementary school students, Level 2 for middle school students, and Level 3 for high school students.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 2014 10:07 PM

Thanks to the NCGE and the Baseball Hall of Fame for working together to bring us these great resources...play ball!!  On a local note, what baseball team is the most popular in your area?  Is there a geography to fan support? 

Marianne Hart's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:28 AM

 Local teams, stadium name, mascot, Great addition to #MysterySkype

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:50 PM

It neat to think as the population grew a new city needed a new field and team and they use the landscape and culture around them to help decide factors of a team including the name and mascot and even the food. An example would be although you would find hot dogs in every stadium its probably a specialty in Chicago while in New York its pizza and down south in Texas its nachos. 

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Buoyed by Exports, Portugal Chooses Clean Exit From Bailout

Buoyed by Exports, Portugal Chooses Clean Exit From Bailout | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
With promising signs of growth and falling unemployment, Portugal’s prime minister, Pedro Passos Coelho, announced an end to his country’s three-year, $108 billion bailout. (Portugal makes a clean exit from a three-year bailout program.

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Why It Is Time For Finland and Sweden to Join NATO

Why It Is Time For Finland and Sweden to Join NATO | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Russia’s annexation of Crimea has upended fundamental assumptions about European security in the post­–Cold War era. The use of force, violent nationalism, and land grabs are back in style, and a lengthy confrontation between East and West suddenly seems much closer at hand.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 2014 6:26 PM

This makes great sense from a NATO-perspective to try and expand, but this article failed to show why such a union would be good for Finland and Sweden.  Still, an interesting article of potential geopolitical ramifications of Russia's annexation of Crimea. 

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What Vladimir Putin chooses not to know about Russian history

What Vladimir Putin chooses not to know about Russian history | Mrs. Jennings AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

KGB agents are apparently not taught history, or so it would seem from Vladimir Putin 's recent statement that only "God knows" how a portion of southeastern Ukraine ever became part of that country. The Russian president refers to the region as "New Russia," an old idea that has always been — and remains — an aspiration rather than a fact. Luhansk, Donetsk, Odessa and other New Russian cities have been a part of Ukraine for nearly a century. And even before that, they were never truly Russian.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 2, 2014 5:13 PM

Historical context is so critical and in this op-ed piece, a retired history professor explains the historical context that Putin is brushing aside as he seeks to legitimize more land grabs.