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Israel - Gaza conflict

Israel - Gaza conflict | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
Israeli airstrikes began November 14, following months of Palestinian rocket fire into Israel.

 

"Monday, the top leader of Hamas dared Israel to launch a ground invasion of Gaza and dismissed diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-fire in the six-day-old conflict, as the Israeli military conducted a new wave of deadly airstrikes which included a second hit on a 15-story building that houses media outlets."  This photo essay shows 34 powerful images that are emerging from this deadly conflict.  If students need some background to understand who are the major players in this conflict, this glossary should be helpful. 


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Wen Shi's curator insight, July 13, 4:17 AM

I was so shocked while reading this ariticle and seeing those pictures. The conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis is something that is deeply rooted in the history of the two nations. And the war, resulted by this conflict, has taken away many people's lives. The 2 countries's people are suffering. Many kids are just at our ages, they could not get education or anything else that we take for granted here, even had to bear the pain of losing relatives and homes. I could never imagine how sad and disastrous wars can be. :(

Hossan Epiques Novelle's curator insight, July 13, 4:58 AM

The two countries should take the chance to resolve the conflict amicably before the situation tips over and war is inevitable. The loss of lives resulting from the war would be pointless.

Zhiyang Liang's curator insight, July 13, 12:02 PM

In my perspective, why does people will have a thought of eliminating prejudice is that prejudice can lead to unfair treatment or the violation of rights of individuals or groups of people just like the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

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Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting

Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
See how much voter groups have shifted in the 2012 exit polls, compared to 2008. Early numbers are preliminary and may change significantly until midday Wednesday, when poll results are finalized.

 

The 2012 election mostly went as predicted (given Virginia and Florida's voting pattern, I'd invite you to re-think the "Where Does the South Begin" or at least to contextualize the political and cultural implications for the defining the vernacular region of "the South").  I'm sure we've all seen the electoral college map, but this great graphic shows the demographic groups voting patterns that produced that map. 


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Language Worksheet from Class | AP Human Geography 2012-2013

A new study from the American Association of University Women finds new female college graduates educated the same as men and who have similar professional opportunities earn 82 cents to every dollar a male graduate ...
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Project Rubric and Overview Directions | AP Human Geography ...

AP Human Geography Country Profile Project Directions and Rubric Overview: For this project, you will be choosing a country to study and focus on for our culture unit (unit 3). There are many different components of culture, ...
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Gangnam Style! The Anatomy of a Viral Sensation

Gangnam Style! The Anatomy of a Viral Sensation | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
This infographic explores the "Gangnam Style" viral phenomenon.

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Coastal Hazard Threat Map

Coastal Hazard Threat Map | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

This interactive map of coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island shows some basic flooding data including: 1) where are the flood warnings (essential the entire coastline), 2) how high the storm surge is, and 3) how high the waves are.

 

Tags: Rhode Island, water, disasters, geospatial.


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WORD CLOUD: The Words Of The First Presidential Debate

WORD CLOUD: The Words Of The First Presidential Debate | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

Word clouds by www.wordle.net  are some great visual tools to condense large documents into a more manageable (if somewhat imperfect) perspective.  Governor Romney's "word cloud" is the top one and President Obama's is the bottom.  This in a nutshell is what they spoke about the most during the 90 minute debate. 

 


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Geography Strikes Back

Geography Strikes Back | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

To understand today's global conflicts, forget economics and technology and take a hard look at a map, writes Robert D. Kaplan.


This is a timely article that shows the importance of geography in understanding current events throughout the world. Also included in this link are videos and pictures connected to an interactive map that highlights a few global conflicts. Students would benefit from reading this article in preparation for completing a news article assignment. Geographic context always matters; it might not tell the whole story but it will certainly shape it.


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DBHS AP Human Geography 2012-13: Week of Sept. 10-14

DBHS AP Human Geography 2012-13: Week of Sept. 10-14 | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
DBHS AP Human Geography 2012-13 ... My dissertation was a study of South Florida Filipinas whom met their American husbands on the Internet or through pen pal organizations. I wanted to explore how their decisions and ...
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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Seth Dixon, Fortunato Navarro Sanz, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 10:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 7:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.

 

The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.

 

Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Regional NFL Fan Bases

Regional NFL Fan Bases | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

Any cartographic fine-tuning of borders that you would suggest?  What truths does this map obscure?

 

Tags: regions, sport, mapping.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 10, 2012 10:17 AM
As a huge football fan, this map is very interesting to me. It shows how different populations are in different parts of the country due to where fans are located.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:28 PM

I like how this map shows regionaly were most fans of a certain team are.  However one thing it fails to take into account are fans of a certain team that live in another region.  Like I live in Rhode Isalnd so based on the map i would be a Patriots fan, however I am  49ers fan, and I know i am not the only fan of a team not living in that teams region. 

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:49 PM

An excellent visual representation of functional regions.

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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


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Welcome to Google Docs

Welcome to Google Docs | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
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The Nation's Report Card: Geography 2010, Grades 4, 8, and 12

The 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) geography assessment focuses on what students should know to be competent and productive 21st century citizens, combining key physical science and social science aspects of geography into...
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Monitoring the Storm Surge

Monitoring the Storm Surge | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...

 

When the Pawtuxet River flooded in Rhode Island, I was watching this site to get a sense of how bad the flooding was and to put it in historic context (the National Weather Service has links to live data at many locations).  This particular station in NYC at the Battery is important to keep an eye on with Hurricane Sandy because if the strom surge is over 10 feet, the subway system could flood and the issues confronting New York would be devastating.  As meterologist Andy Lesage noted, "During Irene it got to 9.5ft, 8-12 inches shy of flooding the subway system so if the Battery gets to something like 10.25+ ft, it will indicate massive damage to the cities' infrastructure."  For more see, the Weather Underground and Jeff Masters' analysis.

 

Tags: disasters,water, physical, NYC, transportation, weather and climate.


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Gary Robertson's comment, November 2, 2012 9:57 AM
This chart shows graphically how time-of-day (high tide), time-of-month (high lunar tide), and time of landfall all coincided to help create this disaster. it just wasn't a wind-driven event, but a coincidental alignment of several factors resulting in a worst-case result.
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Gangnam Style, Dissected: The Subversive Message Within South Korea's Music Video Sensation

Gangnam Style, Dissected: The Subversive Message Within South Korea's Music Video Sensation | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
Beneath the catchy dance beat and hilarious scenes of Seoul's poshest neighborhood, there might be a subtle message about wealth, class, and value in South Korean society.

 

This is a pretty insightful cultural analysis of the sensation. 


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Jodhpur - India's Blue City

Jodhpur - India's Blue City | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

DB: The aesthetics of architecture within a society not only reveal the communities interpretation of what is considered beautiful or pleasing in appearance but also differentiates between what is considered sacred or important. The symbolic significance of aesthetics in colors, designs and a place of residence can be indicative of socioeconomic standing is within society and what the community values.  Jodhpur, India is well known for the beautiful wave of blue houses that dominate the landscape of a rather dry region. However, it is believed that these blue houses originally were the result of ancient caste traditions. 

 

Brahmins (who were at the very top of the caste system) housed themselves in these “Brahmin Blue” homes to distinguish themselves from the members of other castes. Now that the Indian government officially prohibits the caste system, the use of the color blue has become more widespread. Yet Jodhpur is one of the only cities in India that stands steadfast to its widespread aesthetics obsession with the color blue which is making it increasingly unique, creating a new sense of communal solidarity among its residence.

 

Questions to Consider: How has color influenced the cultural geography of this area?  How are the aesthetics of this community symbolic of India’s traditional past, present and possible future?

 

Tags: South Asia, culture, housing, landscape, unit 3 culture.


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ctoler geo 152's curator insight, July 22, 2:10 AM

never knew this city existed. Blue City!

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Spatial Thinking Key to Solving Crime

Spatial Thinking Key to Solving Crime | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

What are all these news reporters and school administrators doing in my classroom?  Monday, September 24, 2012 was most certainly an interesting day in my Mapping Our Changing World (GEOG 201) class...

 

One of my students applied some mapping skills and spatial analysis to a string of unsolved bank robberies in Rhode Island.  After 7 months of eluding capture with at least 8 robberies under his belt, the "bearded bandit" was aprehended less then 48 hours after my student handed over his analysis to a contact in the police department.  Coincidence?  I think not!  Great work Nic, showing that spatial thinking and geographic skills can be applied to a wide range of disciplines and activities. 


Tags: RhodeIsland, GIS, mapping, GeographyEducation, edtech.   


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, September 25, 2012 8:07 PM
Wow! Awesome story. Professor Dixon thanks for sharing this. Nic must be thrilled and you must be proud!
Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:11 AM
Awesome presentation of it all, it was very interesting.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 8:58 AM
This is a great development! Today, there are so many unsolved crimes because of lack of investigative skills of our investigating authorities. So, if this new way of solving crimes can really help victims to attain justice, then we have to support it, by all means....
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Ms. Staker: AP Human Geography-08/27/12

Appetizer: What is demography? Why should we study it? Main Course: Mental Maps due on Tuesday, September 4th! Take home test on Chapter 1 due today! World Population 7 minute DVD Key terms from chapter ...
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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


Via Seth Dixon, Fortunato Navarro Sanz, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 12:26 PM
An intelligent man, to say the least. i particularly enjoyed the demonstration at the end of birth rates. I found it somewhat surprising that birth rates are not effected much by religion. I felt that typically the religions, such as those that require the couple to be married, would suffer, it being harder to have a child later on. I suppose this would be no difference if they were married early on however.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2013 1:09 PM

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous APHG website; Check it out!

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 9:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:31 AM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 10:15 AM

Fascinating interactive map looking at the separatist movements in Africa.  

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:00 PM

It seems as though African countries are actually trying to go back to their pre-colonial boundaries. The agreement they made to respect the old colonial borders to avoid war has never been effective.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

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PopulationPyramid.net

PopulationPyramid.net | Mrs. G's Classroom | Scoop.it
Interactive Visualization of the Population Pyramids of the World from 1950 to 2050...

Via Jane Ellingson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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