Mrs. Cuda's Class
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Mrs. Cuda's Class
Resources and current events articles relevant to the study of our world and your success in this class.
Curated by Mrs. Cuda
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How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


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Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:39 PM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:12 AM

Very interesting!

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How to make a newly learned word 'stick'

How to make a newly learned word 'stick' | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
For your brain to process and retain new information, you've got to think!

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:31 AM

Explanation for learning new words. Good intro for how to learn Geography vocab

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 25, 2013 7:45 PM

Great for HUG vocab!

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Toronto at Night

Toronto at Night | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:10 PM

Ironically, some land use patterns become more visible as the sun goes down.  There are some sharp borders in this image of Toronto that was taken by the Canadian astronaut, Chris Hadfield and it is a wonderful teaching image. 


Questions to ponder: Why is there such sharp divisions between the illuminated and obscure portions of the image?  What does this sharp division say about the land use patterns?  Would we see this pattern in the United States?  Why or why not?  What urban model(s) can help explain the spatial layout of Toronto? 


Tags: urban, planning, remote sensing, geospatial, Canada, models, unit 7 cities.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:45 PM

What urban model is this?

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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Food for thought: an actor's new role ... in the grocery store

Food for thought: an actor's new role ... in the grocery store | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
By Ron Mott, Correspondent, NBC News NEW ORLEANS -- As a boy, Wendell Pierce dreamed of leaving his hometown one day for the world stage.

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Writing FRQs

"AP Human Geography Free Response Questions should be approached in a very deliberate and specific way. APHG teacher Tom Landon explains his approach to teaching students how to do it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:10 PM

For those preparing students for the AP Human Geography test, this video gives great advice to help you instruct students on how to approach the Free Response Questions (FRQs).  Understanding the content always comes first, but some bright students who I know understand the content fail to read the instructions or to answer every portion of the questions.  This will help those APHG students.


TagsAPHG, training, geography education.

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Syrian refugees update 2013

Syrian refugees update 2013 | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it

"Another refugee camp opened today in Mrajeeb al-Fhood, Jordan, to accommodate the reported 1,500 to 2,000 Syrians fleeing to Jordan daily.  Just over a year ago the Big Picture posted an entry of the growing number of people displaced due to the conflict that now has lasted over two years. The United Nations recently said a total of around 7,000 to 8,000 Syrians are leaving their country daily; there are 1.3 million Syrian refugees and almost 4 million more have been displaced inside Syria since the start of the conflict. Posted here is another glimpse of daily life for those displaced since the beginning of this year." 


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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MAANDO_PROTOTYPE's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:19 PM

http://syria-freedom-2014.tumblr.com/
FREEDOM GRAFFiTi WEEK Syria ... MAANDO...PROTOTYPE
#Syria #MAANDO #PROTOTYPE #SYRIAN

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:13 PM

Conflicts in Syria have led almost 4 million refugees to displace to Jordan. Refugee camps have been set up to aid these families the best ways possible. although conditions are still tough, they are much safer than in Syria. These photos embrace the combinations of struggle and joy. Children cry and children play. Families create homes within the tents and make due with what they have.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:21 PM

It’s great to know the many good things people are trying to do to protect some of their citizens. When looking at the pictures, there obviously wasn’t much of a home aspect to their living situation but it’s great to know that they seem to be happier where they are now to where they were before. The picture with the Syrian refugee little boy shaking hands with an Emirati Red Crescent is priceless. The smile on that little boys face touched me and I could feel the happiness with his smile. The facts that the citizens have a choice to leave for a better environment is great and knowing there is a happier ending for them is great. The picture with the kids playing and smiling is also great. As a student going to school to become an elementary school teacher it’s astonishing in the happiness these kids get from playing with nothing. Very different to how children are raised here in the US. But great to know how there happiness can one day be restored since leaving.

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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Robots help Japan's ageing population

Robots help Japan's ageing population | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
As an increasingly crowded world readies to welcome its seven billionth citizen, Japan faces the opposite problem -- a shrinking population that has to depend on a new kind of friend: robots.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 13, 2013 11:32 PM

Technology and aging population

Janice Chia's curator insight, July 5, 2013 10:27 PM

We should use robots to enable care givers to spend more human interaction time with the elderly rather than replace humans altogether.

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Ageing Japan

Ageing Japan | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
How can the world's most elderly society overcome its demographic crisis?

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 14, 2013 12:05 AM

Living longer is a product of an improved standard of living, but there are costs as well as benefits as is shown in the Japanese culture.

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The Persistent Geography of Disadvantage

The Persistent Geography of Disadvantage | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
NYU sociologist Patrick Sharkey takes a hard look at why racial inequality in so many American neighborhoods spans generations.
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How Geography Explains the United States

How Geography Explains the United States | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it

Via Emma Lafleur, Seth Dixon
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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, April 18, 2013 9:39 AM

There are so many facets to geography and the United States has certainly benefitted from all of them; from location to abundant natural resources to cultural histories. I think this is a good introduction to the topic.

Louis Culotta's comment, April 18, 2013 12:41 PM
I would think that the united states treats Canada a lot better at than in Mexico because of the border issues that exist because of people trying to smuggle drugs or people into America from Mexico continues to be abig problem with the US goverment.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:48 PM

I think the very last paragraph of this article is one of the truest statements about America that I have ever read.  "There's so much good America can do in the world." This is absolutely true because as the author covered, the U.S. is very good at getting involved in foreign affairs and we are extremely lucky to have the borders that we do.  We're safe on this side of the globe, a world away from the places that have suffered religious and political turmoil for centuries.  

However, the citizens of the U.S. often remain marginally uneducated about out foreign affairs because of the portrayals by the media and the many covered up mistakes that the U.S. has made.  The author of this piece noted America's three major faults as pragmatism, idealism, arrogance and ambivalence.  The United States is ultimately the most conceited country in the world but it's not entirely the fault of its citizens.  U.S. media's job is not necessarily to report the truth but report the fractions of truth that will continue to inspire nationalism, even if that means leaving out the fact that many problems around the world have been increased due to America's participation.

The author of this piece pointed out America's habit of only joining in when it is beneficial for our country, even if it is not in the best interest of the people we are helping.  We offered assistance to the reformers in Egypt but ignored problems raging in Bahrain.  The U.S. has only limited understanding of many of the old, traditional cultures that reign in parts of the Middle East but that does not stop the country from trying to help and often, looking foolish or inciting more unrest.

We have grown to feel very safe in on our side of the planet and regardless of the few attacks that have penetrated America's defense, we still have a very limited world view because there are no threats from our neighbors and it is okay to be whomever you'd like to be (technically speaking because racism, sexism, and homophobia are still rampant in this country) without threats from people around you.  It would be in our country's best interest to educate ourselves on world events and other cultures to be well rounded and less offensive to those who suffer in other regions. The author called America's belief that the problems between Israeli's and Palestinians would resolve with a classic Hollywood happy ending a part of America's problem with idealism and not understanding what it is like to have neighbors who want to dive in during the midst of horrible wars and take whatever they can get their hands on.   Having the borders that it does, it was never a real threat that the U.S. faced. 

I think this article is spot on with the problems in U.S. foreign policy and how geography affects our culture and our ideas of how the world works.

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Topographic Maps

Topographic Maps | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
USGS National Geologic Database- TopoView

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 2013 10:38 AM

The National Geologic Map Database is a simple interactive tool to find USGS topographic maps that you can dowload.  Users can search for current or historic maps.  

 

Tagsgeospatial, GIS, mapping, cartography.

Paul Nicoara's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:05 PM

The National Geologic Map Database is a simple interactive tool to find USGS topographic maps that you can dowload.  Users can search for current or historic maps.  

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Air Pollution Linked to 1.2 Million Deaths in China

Air Pollution Linked to 1.2 Million Deaths in China | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
Air pollution was the fourth leading risk factor for deaths in China, accounting for the loss of 25 million healthy years of life from the population, a study said.

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
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Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, April 2, 2013 7:48 PM

While this is a fasinating article in and of itself, it also sheds light on why China is eager to embrance hydropower over coal. 

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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Is this the most polluted place on Earth? The Russian lake where an hour on the beach would kill you

Is this the most polluted place on Earth? The Russian lake where an hour on the beach would kill you | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
Lake Karachay, in Russia's Chelyabinsk region, is located within the Mayak Production Association, one of the country's largest — and leakiest — nuclear facilities.

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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Geocube

Geocube | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it

"Geocube is an attractive online resource about Geography. Geocube is based on the principle of the Rubik Cube with six faces and 54 topics. It is a virtual and easily accessible website which is available online for free. Move the Geocube around with your mouse and explore the faces and topics.Geocube provides an accessible way to read, see and watch what Geography is and geographers do."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 14, 2013 4:39 PM

Geografhy education I¡ve  recently open it

Maricarmen Husson's comment, April 14, 2013 4:41 PM
I've recentli open it, is a good resourse for students and every peoples who likes geography
Jeffrey Miller's curator insight, August 4, 2014 11:12 PM

Fantastic photography

 

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The Geography of Chechnya

The Geography of Chechnya | Mrs. Cuda's Class | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 19, 2013 10:16 AM

Most Americans had never heard Chechnya before the Boston bombing in April 2013. Now, most think that it is full of America-hating terriosts. However, Chechnya is so very complex and diverse a place, that it is ludacris to think that. Over 100 languages are spoken in the country. The southern half speaks languages such as Georgian, Svan and Mingrelian. Turkish, Iranian and Chechens are the languages you will probably hear in the North. Another misconception is that there are many Christians in Chechnya as well as Muslims. This country is made up of so many different groups, it is incredible. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:27 AM

It is amazing to consider such a small area (the size of New England) could hold such a vast area of languages.  The mountainous region certainly helps in creating such diversity as it isolated villages from each other in the ages before modern communication and travel.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:46 PM

This map does a fantastic job of highlighting the cultural diversity within Russia and the former Soviet states. Understanding how these cultural regions overlap one another is paramount in understanding the region's tensions and the repercussions that result including Chechen terrorism in Russia and even in America (Boston bombings).