Mr Tony's Geography Stuff
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Thailand closes dive sites over coral bleaching crisis

Thailand closes dive sites over coral bleaching crisis | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
In a rare move to shun tourism profits for environmental protection, 10 popular dive sites have been shut down in a bid to slow a coral bleaching crisis
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Driven out of Mernda by two-hour traffic jams

Driven out of Mernda by two-hour traffic jams | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Charmaine Brillanti lives in Mernda - but not for long. She has had enough of the traffic.
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Global diplomacy map shows the magnitude of the world's diplomatic networks - Geoawesomeness

Global diplomacy map shows the magnitude of the world's diplomatic networks - Geoawesomeness | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Tweet Share on Facebook Share Share Email Pin Pocket Flipboard Really interesting mapping project has been created by The Lowy Institute for International Policy based on their Global Diplomacy Index. The interactive tool maps and ranks the diplomatic networks of all forty-two G20 and OECD nations. Global Diplomacy Index is based on a number of country’s embassies,
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A Pacific salmon hub is under threat

A Pacific salmon hub is under threat | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
The Skeena River snakes out of fir-lined fjords on the misty northern coast of British Columbia, and washes over a thousand-acre sandbar. Flora Bank is a biological bottleneck over which millions o…
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Sliding towards anarchy

Sliding towards anarchy | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Political, ethnic and economic crises stalk Rwanda’s neighbour
Tony Hall's insight:
This is worrying!
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Hong Kong's Urban Jungle by Andy Yeung - Agonistica

Hong Kong's Urban Jungle by Andy Yeung - Agonistica | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Photographer Andy Yeung used a drone to capture the urban density of Hong Kong - where more than 100,000 people live in 40 square meter apartment - for his project Urban Jungle.
Tony Hall's insight:
These images are amazing. A fantastic discussion starter for IB Geography Urban Environments.
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The story of cities | Cities | The Guardian

The story of cities | Cities | The Guardian | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Tony Hall's insight:
This is a great series of articles about some of the world best & least known cities. Definite links to IB Geography Urban Environments. I must confess I have only read one article but I generally find The Guardian's stuff to be pretty good. 
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The diabetes epidemic: Up to half a million Australians have this deadly disease without realising it

The diabetes epidemic: Up to half a million Australians have this deadly disease without realising it | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
These charts show why drastic action is needed to halt the march of silent killer linked to 3.7 million deaths a year.
Tony Hall's insight:
This is a very interesting (if a little worrisome!) article. There is so much geography in it. It has very obvious links to the IB Geo optional theme The Geography of Health & Medicine. I think there are also strong links to the Disparities in Development core topic. There are lots of opportunities for mapping activities based on the data in the article.
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
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Why medium-sized towns are the key to a sustainable future

Why medium-sized towns are the key to a sustainable future | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Cities are rarely planned with the long-term in mind. As a result, urban living can be socially and environmentally unsustainable. But not always: Nick Sharp has a provocative vision of a city built to last forever.
Tony Hall's insight:

This is a very interesting read. It references Ernst Schumacher's philosophy that "small is beautiful" and that we (society) "cannot consider the problem of technological production solved if it requires that we recklessly erode our finite natural capital and deprive future generations of its benefits."  

It fits nicely into  the IB Geography Urban Environments subtopic The Sustainable City. As read the article, a few things ran through my mind:

1. This is such a good idea!

2. It would take a long time for people from developed countries to buy into it.

3. What would it look like?

4. What can I use to get my learners to explore this 

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Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
American education is largely limited to lessons about the West.

 

When I turned 15, my parents sent me alone on a one-month trip to Ecuador, the country where my father was born. This was tradition in our family—for my parents to send their first-generation American kids to the country of their heritage, where we would meet our extended family, immerse ourselves in a different culture, and learn some lessons on gratefulness.

My family’s plan worked. That month in Ecuador did more for my character, education, and sense of identity than any other experience in my early life.

 

Tags: place, tourism, education, geo-inspiration.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Hall's insight:

This is a great article. I think it applies to people who live in all developed countries (not just the USA), as well as the privileged people from the less developed places. It touches on a lot of things I care about - seeing, feeling, smelling how other people live. Learning that we are not all the same. Knowing that it is ok to not engage with the "American/Australian/Western Dream". Knowing that it is ok to have your own dreams that are different to other people. 

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:06 PM

I completely agree with this article. It is based on the same premise that my spanish teacher always told us. "The only way to truly learn the language and the culture is to actually go there and stay for a period of time." I always assumed she was right based on how easy the class seemed to be for those who had been to Spain or Mexico. The only problem with this theory is the increasingly dangerous state of the world. If I had a child I'm not sure I would allow them to travel anywhere after the Paris attacks. After all, Paris was supposed to be one of the safest places American tourists could visit up until about a month ago.

Tina Little-Coltrane's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 AM

An Absolute #TRUTH !!

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 7:15 PM

Being able to travel is a great gift. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing new places and learning about cultures. Unfortunately, the last time that I could afford to travel far from home was when I was young and I didn't understand the amazing opportunity that I had at the time. I traveled to Aruba, and to New Brunswick, Canada. Both amazing places. If I could go anywhere, I'd go to Germany, London, and Ireland as soon as possible. My great grandmother was from England, and my great grandfather was from Canada, I'd like to visit their home towns. Traveling places would definitely be a better learning experience than leaning about a place in school. You get to experience the real thing. Interact with the locals and maybe even get involved with the local traditions. Traveling to learn is definitely an experience worth wild.

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The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province

The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Gansu Province, in northwestern China, is about the same size as California, with a population of about 26 million people. Gansu’s diverse landscapes include parts of the Gobi Desert, the Yellow River, numerous mountain formations, and remnants of the Silk Road and the Great Wall of China.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Hall's insight:

Some truly amazing images in this collection from The Atlantic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 2015 8:43 AM

This photo gallery is filled with dozens of great teaching images, displaying the dramatic human and physical landscapes of the Gansu Province of China. 


Tagsimageslandscape, China.

Jane Ellingson's curator insight, October 22, 2015 9:03 AM

Cultural Landscape

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How Japan's 2011 Earthquake Happened (Infographic)

How Japan's 2011 Earthquake Happened (Infographic) | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Huge stresses beneath the surface moved plates of the Earth's crust hundreds of feet horizontally and dozens of feet vertically.
Tony Hall's insight:

This looks to be a really useful resource for tectonic processes.

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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.
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Better Education Can Decrease Wealth Inequality

Better Education Can Decrease Wealth Inequality | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Inequality in global education is at the forefront of global wealth inequality.
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1746 map of London now available as an incredibly detailed Google map

1746 map of London now available as an incredibly detailed Google map | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
The Centre for Metropolitan History and Museum of London Archaeology wanted a map that could help them visualise data from the 18th and 19th centuries. They started by taking John…
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Parag Khanna | Speaker | TED.com

Parag Khanna | Speaker | TED.com | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Geopolitical futurist Parag Khanna foresees a world in which megacities, supply chains and connective technologies redraw the map away from states and borders.
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Megacities, not nations, are the world’s dominant, enduring social structures

Megacities, not nations, are the world’s dominant, enduring social structures | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Cities are mankind’s most enduring and stable mode of social organization, outlasting all empires and nations over which they have presided. Today cities have become the world’s dominant demographic and economic clusters. As the sociologist Christopher Chase-Dunn has pointed out, it is not population or territorial size that drives world-city status, but economic weight
Tony Hall's insight:
This is a really interesting read to go along Parag Khanna's TED Talk on the same topic. I love the idea that nations could be suburbs of megacities. What a challenging concept to process?!
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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it

"The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Hall's insight:
This is really very cool. The ability to compare urban areas allover the world is brilliant. I can see lots of discussions generated by this.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 10:48 AM

At the 2013 ESRI User Conference, the Urban Observatory was unveiled (I shared this earlier, but the URL has since changed, I'm sharing it again).  The physical display contained images from cities around the world to compare and contrast diverse urban environments.  The online version of this was announced during in a 10 minute talk by Jack Dangermond and Hugh Keegan.  This interactive mapping platform let's users access 'big data' and have it rendered in thematic maps.  These maps cover population patterns, transportation networks, and weather systems.  This is a must see.  Read Forbes' article on the release of Urban Observatory here.

 

Tags: transportation, urban, GIS, geospatial, ESRI.

Brian Weekley's comment, April 14, 8:20 AM
This is fabulous, Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Brian Weekley's curator insight, April 14, 8:21 AM
This is just spectacular.
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A Coloring Book for Grown-Ups Who Love City Maps

A Coloring Book for Grown-Ups Who Love City Maps | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
City Maps invites you to customize detailed plans of the world’s capitals.
Tony Hall's insight:
I came across this today. So cool!
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Every recorded hurricane, cyclone, and typhoon since 1850

Every recorded hurricane, cyclone, and typhoon since 1850 | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Based on the NOAA’s historical tropical storm tracks data, which includes storms dating as far back as 1850, the map above shows a top-down view of every hurricane, cyclone, and typhoon in recorded hi — Map created by Vividmaps in CartoDB
Tony Hall's insight:
This a brilliant map! I love the pattern created by the storm tracks. Especially the empty space around the equator.
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The world’s population mapped by who is online

The world’s population mapped by who is online | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
What does the world map look like if it is sized to online populations?
Tony Hall's insight:

This is a really interesting visualisation of internet use from 2013. It relates really well to the IB Geography HL unit on Global Interactions.

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The flow towards Europe - Lucify

Europe is experiencing the biggest refugee crisis since World War II. Based on data from the United Nations, we clarify the scale of the crisis.
Tony Hall's insight:

If you like geography and animations, then this is definitely for you! Thanks to the Auckland Geography Teacher's Association.

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Climate Change Is Here

Climate Change Is Here | Mr Tony's Geography Stuff | Scoop.it
Record heat, fading ice, and rising seas show how climate change is affecting us. But there’s new hope we can cool the planet. Here’s how.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Hall's insight:

This is a very good resource on climate change. Well worth having a look:)

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Samantha VandeBunte's curator insight, October 29, 2015 10:46 PM

I think that this is an increasingly controversial topic in America today

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:30 AM

This site is great to show evidence of climate change. It has various sites with videos and articles.  The interactive is organized to answer these main questions:

How do we know it’s happening?How do we fix it?How do we live with it?
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 10:15 AM

There is too much talk about helping the climate and environment. All politicians do is talk about cleaning the environment and having less pollution. Even Al Gore is big talk. I've only heard of little change. I want to see a difference. I want to see people actually doing things to help the environment. Enough talk. What should happen is a world wide clean up. Jobs should be created where people should clean in their own community. Its a simple job. Get a trash bag, get off your lazy butts, get out of the house, get a group together (who would be paid by the state) to pick trash up off the streets, beaches, trails in the woods, baseball fields, parks. This isn't hard to do. Not just one person, but if a group of people can come together and be employed by their state to clean their community, at least four days a week. There should also be a group of people, even fisherman to clean the ocean, go out and get what ever trash you can find. Using nets, and if fish are caught, throw them back in the ocean. Also, Trash Island has to be eliminated. It boggles my mind that who ever passed the law on trash being dumped into the ocean an Okay to do. Are you kidding me?? What is wrong with you? Our Earth is dying because of humanity. Also the oil spill that happened in 2012, I believe, I saw a man on the news that created a way to capture the oil floating on the surface of the ocean with a blanket like material, sure it would take a lot of those "blankets" but at least it would be helping to rid the ocean from oil. What are people thinking?? that the oil will just disappear?? Are you serious? So many people really have to open their minds. Look at what's happening you ignorant selfish fools. I will finish my rant right here.