Mr. Soto's Human Geography
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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources

Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Data is great, but working with numbers can be intimidating. We have more data than ever before that is available to us, and graphs, charts, and spreadsheets are ways that data can be shared. If that data has a spatial element to it, the best way to visualize a large dataset might just be a map."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2015 3:51 PM

I hope you enjoy this article I wrote about GeoFRED, a way to visualize economic statistics.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicdevelopment, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:05 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 4:54 PM

Data, data...its all about data!

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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…

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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less. 

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.

 

Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Empowering Women a 'triple win' for Sustainable Development

Vimeo is a respectful community of creative people who are passionate about sharing the videos they make. Use Vimeo if you want the best tools and highest quality video in the universe.

 

To successfully create a sustainable society, you need development in three areas: social, economic and environmental sustainability.  Gender empowerment, many argue is the key to creating a society that not only is more just, but is more sustainable.  For more read: http://www.rtcc.org/living/eu-summit-empowering-women-a-triple-win-for-sustainable-development/


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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project

10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here are 10 facts about poverty in Africa that demonstrate the widespread consequences of poverty that affect education, health, food consumption and more.

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Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  

 

Tags: Africa, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:24 PM

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  


TagsAfrica, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:15 PM

The issues outlined by Western media concerning Africa are serious problems that the continent will continue to face over the course of the next century. However, Western media has a tendency to focus only on the troubles faced by Africa rather than its successes. We grow up hearing of starving children in Ethiopia, government instability, and the need for the West to donate and help their "less fortunate" kin. Africa has, in fact, made serious strives in terms of economic development, with serious foreign investment- particularly from the Chinese- and the growth of Africa's own industrial base contributing to rapid improvements in standards of living and infrastructure. The West continues to paint the picture of Africa that fits the narrative it has painted for the past century- an underdeveloped continent reliant on Western aid. However, despite the issues outlined in this article remaining serious issues, it cannot be denied that Africa has enjoyed serious progress over the past two decades. The political instability that plagued the continent for much of the second half of the 20th century has diminished, and will only continue to improve. Africa is turning into a major economic force on the world stage, no matter what the media is telling us- it will be interesting to see how much longer this false image of Africa can continue to be portrayed to the public.

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:41 PM

Geography played an important role in spreading this disease like wild fires. In a rural place such as Liberia where there is low literacy rates and  limited knowledge of Ebola, it can be spread without people knowing what is happening. On top of that there are workers crossing the border everyday for work and exposing it to everyone around them. This even took place in west Africa where Ebola breakout are unheard of. All these contributing factor led to the worst epidemic of the century. 

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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:34 PM

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:58 AM

Besides that scrap metal pollutes water and rivers, this is a health risk for humans too. I also know someone who worked at Electric Boat at the Air Base in North Kingstown who's health was also affected due to metal scraps and particles in the air. Years later after working at EB he developed lung cancer. Metal erodes away as well, especially when left sitting in salt water. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:54 AM

this is both amazing and horrifying in what these people do on a daily basis. i cannot imagine doing what these guys do everyday, and i never imagined how taking apart one of these ships would work.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:16 AM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh,  South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:33 PM

In my opinion, I do not think that the world could be approaching stage 5. I'm not sure if the world as a whole will ever reach stage 5. Our population is increasing and even though birth rates are low I still think that stage 4 is where we will be stuck. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:52 PM

This article discusses the demographic transition model, mostly Stage 5. Stage 5 is still slightly an unknown thing, because many people argue whether there are any countries in that phase or not. Stage 5 is characterized with very low birth rates, low death rates, lots of family oriented planning, and a slow decrease in population. Some people argue Germany is already in this stage, but I don't really agree. 

I think we should focus more on the developing countries that are stuck in stage 2. 

USA is in stage 4, and I believe that we will be stuck here for a while before advancing to stage 5. 

This is a good article for people that are interested in this unit to read, it gives a new perspective on things. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:44 AM

Summary- With his Demographic Transition Model, Warren Thompson suggested that we are in the midst of a transition shown by stage 4, in which birth rates are equaling death rates. But if we analyze the demography in the present day, we will find that we are already past that stage. Most countries in the world are now entering or already in stage 5, in which birth rates are lower than death rates, making it very difficult, if not impossible for the population to grow. These current trends have led to an increased empowerment of women in western countries, since less babies mean more working hours, and more profits. It has also allowed for inter-generational relationships within families, where a children is able to meet his grandparents and even his great grandparents. In Europe, the birth rate is currently below the replacement level. The only way Europe has been able to increase or at least maintain its population is through waves of immigration.

 

Insight- it's is incredible that we are taught that we are experiencing the fourth stage of the Demographic Transition model, and that stage 5 talks about the future. What we may have not noticed is that many countries of the world are already part of that future; they have started to be part of this stage without us realizing it. I really liked the prediction made in the last paragraph. The fertility increase in more developed countries can take us to a new stage 6 in Thompson's model.