Mr. Soto's Human Geography
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White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier

White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In the United States, there is a long tradition of trying to draw sharp lines between ethnic groups, but our ancestry is a fluid and complex matter. In recent years geneticists have been uncovering new evidence about our shared heritage, and last week a team of scientists published the biggest genetic profile of the United States to date, based on a study of 160,000 people."


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:58 PM

Some people like to distant themselves form a certain ethnic background, when we are all one. Europeans came from one area same with latinos, blacks and natives we all are similar. Africans have a major influence to  who Europeans are and also who most of the americans did descend from so theres a possible connection somewhere.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, January 29, 2015 12:50 PM

This article was very intriguing, especially because there have been so many migrations and movements of people in the U.S.  When you think about it, people were already here, and then Europeans came, and then they brought over Africans.  But, since then, people from all over the world have continuously moved here and spread throughout the country. In this map, you can see each region, and it's almost just how you would imagine it to be.  The south has more people who think that have some amount of African ancestry, and with the amount of slavery that had occurred, that makes sense.  However, the line between the percentage of African decent you have that makes you to be considered white, and then one percent more and you are African-American, is a bit bizarre to me.  In reality, in today's society, we are just as focussed on who is what race as they were a hundred years ago, whereas it actually should not matter anymore.  But, we don't live in a perfect world, and people need to be willing to work to get to that point.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 16, 2015 10:05 AM

I found this article particularly interesting because my father recently had a DNA test done. As a Portuguese immigrant, he was surprised to find how varied of a background he comes from, with significant parts of his DNA tracing its origins to Southern Europe (outside the Iberian Peninsula, which only constituted 50% of his markers), the British Isles, Northern Africa, and West Africa. What I think everyone should take away from this article is that the human species is a beautiful mosaic of intermingling cultures and nationalities, especially here in the United States. We are all a part of each other, despite a past filled with hate (the article discusses a Pocahontas Law in Virginia that honestly had me chuckling at the hypocrisy of the legislators who drafted it) and issues of race that continue to plague us a society to this day. Race is entirely a social construct, and issues of white and black become meaningless when you look at data such as that complied in this article. A very interesting read.

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

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Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

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America's fastest shrinking cities

America's fastest shrinking cities | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The U.S. population rose by just 0.72% in 2013, the lowest growth rate in more than 70 years. Not only has the country become less-attractive to immigrants than in years past, with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year, but also the U.S.'s domestic birth rate has dropped to a multi-decade low.

While the population of most of the country's metro areas grew at a low pace in recent years, in a small number of metro areas the population actually shrank. Looking at the most recent years, the U.S. population rose by just 2.4% between April 2010 and July 2013, but in 30 metro areas the population shrank by at least 1%. The population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, fell a nation-leading 4.4% in that time. Based on recently released U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined the cities with shrinking populations."


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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. I.C.

Kedryn bray's curator insight, March 15, 2016 9:45 AM
I think the United states does have many invisible cultural borders like the way people use certain words like soda or pop or coke. These define where different types of people love and it shows different sides of America. We are split up by many different kinds of small borders but those borders sometimes change the way we all speak and do things.
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Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"If you think the United States is every immigrant's dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013. But relatively, it's upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report 'Trends in International Migrant Stock.'  Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.  Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That's compared to 14.3 percent in the United States." 

 

Tags: migration, population, USA, Australia, Oceania.


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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 3:08 PM

The son of an immigrant, I am always taken aback at the intensity of the hatred that is held by certain Americans towards foreign born individuals, as if being born in a different country is the greatest affront to all that we as Americans are supposed to hold dear to us. There is a lot of rhetoric in the current political climate concerning the rate of immigration to the US, with most conservatives unanimously declaring that there are too many foreign born peoples in the US; that our economy, ways of life, and culture are doomed to collapse under the weight of huge waves of uneducated, impoverished immigrants. While immigration is a controversial topic in this country that does deserve a portion of the attention that it receives, it was interesting to learn that immigration is so largely blown out of proportion here in the US, especially compared to other countries. 14.3% of Americans are foreign born; this number seems relatively large, until you learn that 1 in 4 New Zealanders were not born in New Zealand, and yet the immigration debate isn't anywhere near as fierce in New Zealand as it is here in the states. Perhaps we should borrow from the New Zealand model, and show a little more tolerance towards those who were born elsewhere, but call our country home. We pride ourselves on being the "melting pot" of the globe, and it's time that we actually start acting like it, instead of giving into ignorance, fear, and internal fighting.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:35 AM

Immigration has become a dominate issue in the 2016 presidential campaign. For those who believe that the United States is letting in to many immigrants, I refer you to the statistics in this article. Only 14 percent of our population is foreign born. The United States ranks 65th in the world in the percentages of the population that is foreign born. We are far behind the two most prominent Oceanic nations, Australia and New Zealand. Nearly twenty eight percent of Australians are foreign born. Twenty five percent of New Zealanders are also foreign born. Those nations are actually more representative of the melting pot philosophy, than the United States is.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:16 PM

the us is not the choice nation of nations. it is not the most sought nation for migrants. that means we must be doing something right or wrong.

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2014 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 2014 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


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Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

In this day and age we see more people migrating then staying. People move for numerous things, a trend that causes a lot of migration is when people retire they move to southern Florida. They get tons of sun rays and meet a lot of people their age there. Another reason people migrate is for jobs. If their job tells them they have to move across state they do which causes more migration. ~R.J~

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

The map is what originally attracted me to this article, but I must admit that the actual article was very interesting. Lots of the moves were from Phoenix, Arizona. Why people moved from Phoenix was not information that was disclosed in the article, but because of that, it made me wonder and want to learn more about this topic. AW :)

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:30 AM

I've seen something like this before.  More people leaving a location than entering it.  Something may have caused them to move, Push and Pull factors are both in this.  Job opportunities or the extreme heat of Phoenix may have caused them to leave.  It shows that most people went to the Northeast, where it is cooler and has more people.

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


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Max Minard's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:57 PM

Back in 2012, the number of Mexican immigrants coming to America had declined due to several push factors, mainly involving the rough economy "north of the border". Despite the fact that many Mexican immigrants are still migrating to America, many have decided against this decision based off factors such as the risk of the making the trek and the more evident reason being that America's economy is going through a rough time. They don't want to show up in America unable to find employment which is the reason they had left their previous country. I personally think this is an accurate outlook considering 2012 experienced many rough patches in the economy which can further result in the decrease in incoming immigrants. Overall, this tough and amid economy in America along with the long, risky trek can both be classified as push factors, pushing away Mexican immigrants from wanting to settle in The United States.

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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Fortunato Navarro Sanz, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s.