Mr. Soto's Human Geography
1.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Norway -- National Geographic Photo of the Day

Norway -- National Geographic Photo of the Day | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Sea and mountains surround the fishing village of Hamnoy on Norway's Lofoten Islands in this National Geographic Photo of the Day from our Your Shot community.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Kerry comments on 'apartheid' tap into heated debate in Israel - Fox News

The Hindu
Kerry comments on 'apartheid' tap into heated debate in Israel
Fox News
(AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed, File)The Associated Press. Mideast Israel Apartheid ....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Photos: Land Use Change Destruction to Grow Biofuels - Big Picture Agriculture

Photos: Land Use Change Destruction to Grow Biofuels - Big Picture Agriculture | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Big Picture Agriculture Photos: Land Use Change Destruction to Grow Biofuels Big Picture Agriculture About eight months after I wrote that, the Associated Press did an in-depth story on the same subject in November 2013, concluding the same as I...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Egypt's Black Site Torture Camps - Daily Beast

Egypt's Black Site Torture Camps - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Egypt's Black Site Torture Camps Daily Beast But instead of completing his semester, the student leader of protests against the army's return to power, orchestrated by former general and now president Abdel Fattah El Sisi, says he was disappeared...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Turkey Gives Up On Unified Iraq - Daily Beast

Turkey Gives Up On Unified Iraq - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Turkey Gives Up On Unified Iraq
Daily Beast
All but defenseless against ISIS and suffering from punishing shortages of vital resources, Iraq's ancient Christian communities are taking their only option: leave.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

AP Human Geography Susan Hollier

Susan Hollier talks about the Confer® Mentoring program and shares some valuable resources to help you get ready to teach AP® Human Geography.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Iran sees 'no benefit' in nuclear weapon, FM says - The Times of Israel

Iran sees 'no benefit' in nuclear weapon, FM says - The Times of Israel | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Times of Israel Iran sees 'no benefit' in nuclear weapon, FM says The Times of Israel “The politics of geography — the fact that we're bigger, the fact that we're stronger, that we're more populous, the fact that we have a better technology,...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot

Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Is this an opportune moment for Eurasian powers to tackle the festering Nagorno-Karabakh conflict?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 2014 12:26 PM

You can find this on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagorno-Karabakh

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 2014 12:44 PM

The Crimea region has been hotly debated and fought over for quite a while now. The collapse of the USSR created a power vacuum in Eastern Europe which led to the contest for power in many of the former Soviet Satellite countries, including Ukraine. The Crimean peninsula, while mostly occupied by Russians, is legally a part of Ukraine, but maybe not for long. The Russian government is seemingly working to annex the peninsula while the Ukrainian government is working to keep it. The region will continue to be under lots of tugging and pulling for a while until a single government wins in to their nation. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:36 AM

this is a perfect example of some of the conflicts which have resulted because of the failure of the soviet state. with many of these states trying to gain land that the view as theirs, these wars can only really end in bloodshed or massive investments in peace.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographic Calibrations

Geographic Calibrations | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the roles of distance and area in some activities, by no means has it eliminated the utility of these concepts."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 12:56 PM

We tend to forget how easy it is to compare the sizes and distances, especially when considering the move form 3D to 2D. Something to consider when reading and interpreting maps.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:35 PM

A central theme of geography is place and the spacial organization of it. The USA is an extremely large area and its citizens often don't recognize this fact. Manifest destiny was a concept that stated that it was an American's duty to expand into the frontier to further the dominion of the American government. This imperialistic tendency ended when the US reached the Atlantic Ocean, but the land conquered was vast. Many countries in the world can fit many times over into the continental United States, but the citizens of the states take this fact for granted. This article serves as a needed reminder of this fact, and helps people put America's spacial consumption into perspective. 

Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:50 PM

Really puts the size of countries into perspective... 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Indians take #AntiDowryPledge on social media

Indians take #AntiDowryPledge on social media | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Netizens use hashtag to raise awareness of thousands of deaths related to traditional custom.

Via Matthew Wahl
more...
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 9:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:44 PM

With all the good we thought NAFTA did for the three countries involved, I feel that sometimes we overlook the bad.  Southern Mexico has felt all negative affects from NAFTA.  While the northern states in Mexico are able to keep up with the advanced agricultural processes that America has, the south is unable to.  The old techniques and lack of machinery prevents the south from having any possible competition with the north as well as America leaving the south to become extremely impoverished and potentially unsuitable for any living.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mrs. B's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:02 AM

Unit 1 !!!!

 

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

State feeling the effects of climate change - Greenville News

State feeling the effects of climate change - Greenville News | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
SFGate State feeling the effects of climate change Greenville News The “National Climate Assessment” reveals in sobering terms the present-day impacts of human activity on the climate: hotter summers, extended droughts, more-intense storms, less...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Geography of the World Africa Land and Resources

I DO NOT own this video nor am I pretending that I do; it is on my channel so my students can view it. This is the only way for them to see this video.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Iran Won't Let Women Watch The World Cup - Daily Beast

Iran Won't Let Women Watch The World Cup - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Iran Won't Let Women Watch The World Cup
Daily Beast
All but defenseless against ISIS and suffering from punishing shortages of vital resources, Iraq's ancient Christian communities are taking their only option: leave.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Clothes Aren't for Men or Women Anymore. They're Just for People. - Daily Beast

Clothes Aren't for Men or Women Anymore. They're Just for People. - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Clothes Aren't for Men or Women Anymore. They're Just for People.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

It's Official: 'Redskins' Is Racist - Daily Beast

It's Official: 'Redskins' Is Racist - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
It's Official: 'Redskins' Is Racist Daily Beast The threat of hordes of giddy entrepreneurs cranking out logo-embossed gear might be enough, since basic human decency hasn't moved the needle, to get the powers-that-be to give Snyder a nudge in the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Our Expensive, Pathetic Health Care - Daily Beast

Our Expensive, Pathetic Health Care - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Our Expensive, Pathetic Health Care
Daily Beast
To stay profitable, goes the argument, we divert health care resources to shareholders, raising our cost per capita and dropping our healthiness. Those hopeful ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Changes to Human Geography AP and IB Credit | Department of ...

Late last year, geography advisor Andrew Sluyter requested that the Office of Admissions change the amount of credit LSU students get for having taken the Human Geography Advanced Placement (AP) and International ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Same place, different perspective

Same place, different perspective | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 2014 8:53 AM

A new perspective can change our perception of reality, as demonstrated by this delightful photo gallery.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:15 PM

This really shows how peoples perception of things arn't truly as they seem

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Cholera outbreak in war-torn South Sudan

Cholera outbreak in war-torn South Sudan | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
WHO says epidemic likely to intensify with armed conflict disrupting food supplies and health services.

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:58 AM

Besides that scrap metal pollutes water and rivers, this is a health risk for humans too. I also know someone who worked at Electric Boat at the Air Base in North Kingstown who's health was also affected due to metal scraps and particles in the air. Years later after working at EB he developed lung cancer. Metal erodes away as well, especially when left sitting in salt water. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:54 AM

this is both amazing and horrifying in what these people do on a daily basis. i cannot imagine doing what these guys do everyday, and i never imagined how taking apart one of these ships would work.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:16 AM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh,  South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.