Mr. Soto's Human Geography
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Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education!

Sudan and South Sudan sign non-aggression pact

Sudan and South Sudan sign non-aggression pact | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
Khartoum and Juba sign memorandum of understanding regarding disputed border, as talks continue over oil pipeline fees.


For an article pointing to some of the factors that might undermine this peace agreement, see:

Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Jose Soto from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, September 17, 2014 9:55 AM

This is a great way for students to explore their "sense of place."

I love this game!


Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education!

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

"Henry Monterroso is a foreigner in his own country. Raised in California from the age of 5, he was deported to Mexico in 2011 and found himself in a land he barely knew. But the 34-year-old now supervises five employees amid rows of small cubicles who spend eight hours a day dialing numbers across the United States. He is among thousands of deported Mexicans who are finding refuge in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English — some hardly speak Spanish — they converse with American consumers who buy gadgets, have questions about warrantees or complain about overdue deliveries."

Via Seth Dixon
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:45 PM

When it comes to deportation, its usually a loss win situation. But in the case of Mexicans who once lived a life on US soil from since birth and having been deported later on in life, adjusting to a new life in a new world is challenging. The comfort of being able to work in an environment that reminds them of being back home eliviates the agony of being separated from their family back in the US. The outsourced phone companies give these deported individual an opportunity to be able to participate in a life they once lived by being able to interact with Americans. While they make subsequently less than what they were making in the states, the opportunity of being able to work in a foreign land is one that they are forever grateful for.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:49 PM

This article is similar to the topic of outsourcing jobs to the United states, only it is the reverse, with deportees being giving jobs at call centers in the city of Tijuana. It brings up the topic of culture shock and the differences between Mexican and United States Economies.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:33 PM

Brings to mind the whole debate over over illegals vs. legals, work visas and work permits, political change and citizenship. So many factors are present in the decisions these Mexican born, living in America, deported back to their home country, must make. How culturally shocking it must be to be living the American Dream in an area that is bi-lingual, San Diego, and be deported back to Tijuana, making $150 a week.

It's a blessing and a curse for both sides of the border. The USA loses tax revenue from the money Henry was bringing in while working in real estate, conversely Mexico gains a smaller slice of the tax given his drop in pay. He clearly was happy and productive here, but others such as the gang member mentioned, may make the USA happier by taking his gang affiliation with him. Not good for Mexico, but perhaps he can make a fresh start in that country.

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."

Via Seth Dixon
Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 


II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.

Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  

Via Seth Dixon
John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:41 PM

Geography played an important role in spreading this disease like wild fires. In a rural place such as Liberia where there is low literacy rates and  limited knowledge of Ebola, it can be spread without people knowing what is happening. On top of that there are workers crossing the border everyday for work and exposing it to everyone around them. This even took place in west Africa where Ebola breakout are unheard of. All these contributing factor led to the worst epidemic of the century. 

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Mapping software helping Wendy's select best locations for restaurants - Columbus Dispatch

Mapping software helping Wendy's select best locations for restaurants - Columbus Dispatch | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
Mapping software helping Wendy's select best locations for restaurants
Columbus Dispatch
The Wendy's human-resources department is using mapping data to learn about wage requirements and available workers, he said.
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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."

Via Seth Dixon
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:34 PM

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.


A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.


Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM


Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM


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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."

Via Seth Dixon
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM


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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."

Via Seth Dixon
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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Faces of Genocide

Faces of Genocide | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
Survival helps tribal peoples defend their lives, protect their lands and determine their own futures.

Via Mr. David Burton
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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.


The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.

Via Seth Dixon
Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 2014 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 2014 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:43 PM

The seemingly random geography of protests shows an inability to be contained and how demographics play a key role in these protests. The protests have broken up into multiple smaller groups, blocking off intersections, and popping up in different locations that are not traditionally used for protesting. Instead of amassing in one large group, the protesters are using an almost guerrilla-like tactic by breaking into smaller numbers that are harder to disband or predict. While protests were traditionally held in Victoria Park, these groups are popping up in all sorts of locations, including residential, school, tourist, and shopping locations. Many college and high school aged children are joining the fray, which is why protests are occurring in areas synonymous with students and younger demographics. Families are also getting involved, which is why some are in residential areas. It is evident that people from all different demographics support democracy.  

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

Via dilaycock, FCHSAPGEO
dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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The Newest Countries in the world

The Newest Countries in the world | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

"Will Scotland follow the same fate as any of the other young nations in the world? Perhaps, but probably not. A glance down the list of the nine newest sovereign states below reveals that each situation is unique: It's hard to fully equate Scotland's situation with that of Slovakia, let alone with East Timor.

Even so, a glance back at history does show that the world's borders are changing more than we might appreciate: And the changes can sometimes take some time to settle."

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:47 PM

unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:20 PM


Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:57 AM
The Newest Countries in the world
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Scotland's Decision

Scotland's Decision | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
From Catalonia to Kurdistan, nationalist and separatist movements in Europe and beyond are watching the Scottish independence referendum closely.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 2014 11:36 AM

Scotland, the site of nationalist and separatist movements, is one to watch as they vote. What the ramifications would be are yet to be seen

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 3:01 PM

It is interesting to see how globalization does as much to bring us together as it does to rip us apart. The exchange of ideas, goods, and people has hugely impacted the lives of everyday citizens and the nations that they call home, where divisions among people are felt more keenly as the competition in today's global economy grows stronger. Catalonia, the region that has done much to keep the economy of the Spanish nation afloat, and Catalans are eager to shed the "dead weight" they feel they are carrying; the Basque region has long since demanded its independence, and we have already seen the fracturing of the Balkans. In some instances, perhaps separation is for the best. However, I feel like these movements are the result of knee-jerk reactions to the current economic climate and deep, underlying hatreds that have no place in the current world order. Spain has been one nation for hundreds of years, as has the United Kingdom; to suddenly dissolve these unions in the name of century-long feuds seems not only unnecessary, but almost child-like. There is enough hatred in the world- why let us continue to divide amongst ourselves when history has shown that people in these regions can coexist and can consistently pull through these difficult periods. It is one thing to be proud of being Scottish- it is another to ignore the economic and political realities of what Scottish independence would bring for its people for the sake of this nationalist sentiment. I, for one, was relieved to see Scotland vote to remain a member of the UK. Separatist movements across the continent have been quieted, if only for another few years.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:16 AM

The Scottish vote for independence would have broken up a modern United Kingdom. Many Scottish folks feel that it is time to separate from a parent country where there are many other countries that are involved. Becoming independent is not an easy task. There has to be a vote and a strong position for those separatists to succeed in getting a victorious vote.

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Scottish Independence

"Scotland is about to vote on whether to secede from the UK. There are solid arguments on both sides."

Via Seth Dixon
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:21 PM

I support Scotland independence! Mother England should understand the current Scotland need more freedom of speech and decisions. This a good example of a peacefully claim of independence, instead of the bloody war (remember England?). The video... Is too funny to take it seriously. 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 27, 2015 7:34 AM

Scotland is vying for its independence from the United Kingdom, becoming free from London and its own Country. Here john Oliver analyzes the issue and provides a decent background history while stabbing lots of jokes and puns into his commentary. So basically England and Scotland got into an arranged marriage as Oliver phrased it, forming the United Kingdom some 300 years ago. Oliver goes on to say Scotland got the bad end of the philosophical relationship, setting up reasons for Scotland ambition to possibly leave. For the last 2 ½ years there has been a campaign for this independence, where Scotts feel they can better run the country they live in. Scotland is a liberal country ran by the conservative country England. These are the reasons that set up this split.   

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 9:27 PM

This video is hilarious and John Oliver pokes fun at the Scottish, the little brother trying to lobby themselves for independence. Great video to watch hilarious, and also informative at the same time.


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What we need to contain ebola - Indianapolis Star

What we need to contain ebola - Indianapolis Star | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
What we need to contain ebola
Indianapolis Star
And unless we invest more resources in fighting it — and coordinate the response across countries — the outbreak will spread further. If that happens, economic and political chaos could follow.
No comment yet.
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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, Jose Soto
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This Is What Gaza Looks Like From Space Right Now

This Is What Gaza Looks Like From Space Right Now | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have shared some incredible space photos with the Twitterverse -- from aerial views of Southern Lights to even out-of-this-world selfies.

But this week, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Ge...

Via Seth Dixon
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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."

Via Seth Dixon
HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:45 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tags: food production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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The Next America

The Next America | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County

A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |
People are leaving Minneapolis for Florida, Detroit for the suburbs, and Washington for New York.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U7

christian's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:26 PM

Unit 2, Population and Migration: Migration

This article and map explain where people of different ages and family sizes move to and from. And why they move there, whether it be a job, college, or even family matters.

This ties into unit 2 by showing where people migrate to. Which explains why people move there. Overall this is a very big concept of unit 2.

Carmen Hart's curator insight, September 6, 3:41 PM
This map is a good representation of the migration of Americans in  the U.S.
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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography |

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:41 PM

This is easier because it shows you the shape of the countries. As for this quiz, I can locate any African country but some of them, not precisely. I'm able to locate Ethiopia, Libya and Angola obviously because they're bigger but not Togo, Eritrea and Rwanda. However, I can closely locate the smaller countries but not precisely.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America.