Mr. Soto's Human ...
Follow
Find
1.5K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

AP Human Geography Susan Hollier

Susan Hollier talks about the Confer® Mentoring program and shares some valuable resources to help you get ready to teach AP® Human Geography.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Iran sees 'no benefit' in nuclear weapon, FM says - The Times of Israel

Iran sees 'no benefit' in nuclear weapon, FM says - The Times of Israel | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Times of Israel Iran sees 'no benefit' in nuclear weapon, FM says The Times of Israel “The politics of geography — the fact that we're bigger, the fact that we're stronger, that we're more populous, the fact that we have a better technology,...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot

Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Is this an opportune moment for Eurasian powers to tackle the festering Nagorno-Karabakh conflict?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 18, 4:00 PM

Recently Crimea has has been a hot topic and in years past Chechyna was another much discussed topic.  Both of these ‘hot spots’ have some important geographic reasons as to why they are hot spots.  The collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent re-emergence of the Russian Federation have created geopolitical ripples that reverberate throughout the region.  Transnistria, Abkhazia and Novorussiya are places that few have ever heard about, but are now becoming critical locations for international relations because of they have an uncertain status that might shift soon.  One place to add to that list is Nagorno Karabakh, a region that is ethnically Armenian but nestled within Azerbaijan.  This article argues that now is an opportune moment to settle this issue that has been festering since the 90s, even if many feel that the international community is indifferent on the issue.    


Tags: political, sovereignty, territoriality, statesAzerbaijan, Armenia.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 12:26 PM

You can find this on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagorno-Karabakh

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 12:44 PM

The Crimea region has been hotly debated and fought over for quite a while now. The collapse of the USSR created a power vacuum in Eastern Europe which led to the contest for power in many of the former Soviet Satellite countries, including Ukraine. The Crimean peninsula, while mostly occupied by Russians, is legally a part of Ukraine, but maybe not for long. The Russian government is seemingly working to annex the peninsula while the Ukrainian government is working to keep it. The region will continue to be under lots of tugging and pulling for a while until a single government wins in to their nation. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographic Calibrations

Geographic Calibrations | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the roles of distance and area in some activities, by no means has it eliminated the utility of these concepts."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 12:56 PM

We tend to forget how easy it is to compare the sizes and distances, especially when considering the move form 3D to 2D. Something to consider when reading and interpreting maps.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:35 PM

A central theme of geography is place and the spacial organization of it. The USA is an extremely large area and its citizens often don't recognize this fact. Manifest destiny was a concept that stated that it was an American's duty to expand into the frontier to further the dominion of the American government. This imperialistic tendency ended when the US reached the Atlantic Ocean, but the land conquered was vast. Many countries in the world can fit many times over into the continental United States, but the citizens of the states take this fact for granted. This article serves as a needed reminder of this fact, and helps people put America's spacial consumption into perspective. 

Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 8:50 PM

Really puts the size of countries into perspective... 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Indians take #AntiDowryPledge on social media

Indians take #AntiDowryPledge on social media | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Netizens use hashtag to raise awareness of thousands of deaths related to traditional custom.

Via Matthew Wahl
more...
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 9:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 11:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 30, 11:50 PM

This is an excellent podcast with many geographic strands running through it. 

Eli Levine's curator insight, May 31, 12:47 PM

Personally, I'm a little resentful that our money is being used to finance Chinese firms.  I'm also not happy that the Chinese aren't using local labor, which would boost economic activity in African societies.  I'm surprised if that's not more of a sore point for the people who live in these societies.

 

But anyway.

 

If we weren't so committed to spreading our political "religion" of democracy and Liberal values, we may have a shot at securing Africa for ourselves.  A pity that we're not as competitive a country as China.  However, if China wants to play international empire, I say let them.  They'll either do a better job than we've done or they'll be as corrupt and exploitative as we were and, thus, end their tenure on "top".  So long as we're able to defend ourselves over here, I see no reason to challenge the artificial empire of China.  That's just my interpretation of history.  Take from it what you will.

 

Think about it.

Bob Manning's curator insight, June 1, 11:43 AM

For Africa to develop, they need a better infrastructure.  China's investment in this area is allowing them access to the huge reserves of resources and growing labor pool.  Is this a repeat of colonialism?  Is there a way to do this in a sustainable manner that is mutually beneficial to both the Chinese and the African countries?

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

After 5 Months of Sales, Colorado Sees the Downside of a Legal High

After 5 Months of Sales, Colorado Sees the Downside of a Legal High | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Adult deaths and children’s emergency room visits in Colorado are being linked to newly legal marijuana, often in its edible form, and opponents of legalization are warning other states to pay heed.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 2, 11:27 PM

Understanding the cultural, political impacts of the Colorado's marijuana legalization can be quite difficult because proponents and  critics each are trying to use the evidence to support their position.  This New York Times article shows the negative impacts while this article emphasizes the positives.  Given both articles, what to you think the impacts are going to be? 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 8:33 AM

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Political Geography Now: World Cup 2014: Which Countries Are (and Aren't) Members of FIFA?

Political Geography Now: World Cup 2014: Which Countries Are (and Aren't) Members of FIFA? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Your guide to which independent countries and territories are eligible for the World Cup, which are shut out, and which are in the finals this year. Includes 4 different maps!

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 10:00 PM

Natural hazards

YEC Geo's curator insight, June 14, 1:10 PM

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 12:13 PM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Mapping global conflict month by month.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Our Expensive, Pathetic Health Care - Daily Beast

Our Expensive, Pathetic Health Care - Daily Beast | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Our Expensive, Pathetic Health Care
Daily Beast
To stay profitable, goes the argument, we divert health care resources to shareholders, raising our cost per capita and dropping our healthiness. Those hopeful ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Soto
Scoop.it!

Changes to Human Geography AP and IB Credit | Department of ...

Late last year, geography advisor Andrew Sluyter requested that the Office of Admissions change the amount of credit LSU students get for having taken the Human Geography Advanced Placement (AP) and International ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Same place, different perspective

Same place, different perspective | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 8:53 AM

A new perspective can change our perception of reality, as demonstrated by this delightful photo gallery.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Cholera outbreak in war-torn South Sudan

Cholera outbreak in war-torn South Sudan | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
WHO says epidemic likely to intensify with armed conflict disrupting food supplies and health services.

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, May 25, 6:04 PM

Where there is a need there is a way.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 12:23 PM

This article shows how parts of the world plays host to some of the more dangerous industries in existence because they are desperate for jobs and will take any work that comes their way. The ship-breakers are mostly men that work to recycle retired cargo ships. This job is extraordinary dangerous due to the fact that the ships are built not to be taken apart. We can see the lack of development in some parts of the world through this industry's presence in southwest Asia. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, June 4, 9:28 PM

Despite massive advances in transporting goods rapidly around our ever increasing connected world, little thought is spared for how we mamage the waste stream. MEDC benefitf rom accessing the range of goods but LEDC have to deal with the dismantling of the transport modes. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When the Minute 319 'pulse flow' began in March 2014, it was not clear whether the effort would be enough to reconnect the Colorado River with the Sea of Cortez. Some hydrologists thought there might be just enough water; others were less optimistic. It turns out the optimists were right, though just barely. For the first time in sixteen years, the Colorado River was reunited with the Sea of Cortez on May 15, 2014."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 5:57 PM

California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; amid a drought this severe and wildfires, it is startling to hear of a project to restore some of the Colorado River Basin's natural patterns and ecology.  


Tags: physicalremote sensing, California, water, environmenturban ecology.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, June 7, 7:43 PM

Parallels with the Murray River...

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:41 PM

Nós somos aquilo que comemos ...

Stuart Shapiro's curator insight, June 25, 8:41 AM

With some drinking thrown in for good measure."

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS

The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
With Tuesday's seizure of Mosul, Iraq's second largest city, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria notched a major victory in its campaign to create a new country containing parts of what had part of both Syria and Iraq. On Wednesday, the insurgents continued their march south, taking control of Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein.

 

The story of ISIS's spread -- and its influence -- is one that begins in Syria, where the group has been waging a brutal insurgency against the regime of Bashar al-Assad and, increasingly, other more moderate and secular rebel groups. The map above depicts the areas of Syria under its control. The group's influence is bounded by the Free Syrian Army in the west, the Kurds in the north, and pockets of government influence.  Who is the ISIS/ISIL?

 

Tags: Syria, Iraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopolitics.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, June 12, 9:18 PM

These folks are no good.

 

They're as dangerous, mean-spirited, and delusional as the conservatives of our own society.

 

Motivated by religious fervor (doesn't matter which one it is), and an authoritarian desire to impose their vision of how a perfect society ought to be, these people ought to be put into mental health clinics and given actual treatment for being dangers to themselves and dangers to others.

 

We, the United States, cannot, and should not, do anything to stop ISIS initially.  We should let them take over, let their brutality lead to popular insurgency against them.

THEN, we ask the people of the region, collectively, whether or not they want our assistance in removing ISIS from control and influence in their society.  We want them to be turning these folks in, to be reporting those who are seeking to join these conservative movements to authorities.  Then, we can advise the authorities to treat the incoming prisoner like the mentally ill and psychologically disturbed/traumatized individuals that they seem to be.

 

We need a mandate and a request from the people living in their SOCIETIES, before we can go in and fight (if we're going to do such a thing, given our current state of war weariness and spent accounts).  We should not be taking direction just from their governments, and we shouldn't read their governments' requests as the need and will of their general public.

 

When fighting these kinds of conflicts, it's of the utmost importance that you maintain popular legitimacy and the mandate from the people to use force against what would otherwise be a persistent and deep-seated problem.  These conservatives can only be removed from the social scene when the public wants them to be removed AND, you must be as kind, benevolent, and effective as possible at handling the people afterward.  No impositions, no expectations; just let them lead their lives on their own, once you help them remove a tumor from their society that they want to have removed.  Nothing more.  Nothing less.

 

Think about it.

sledderwool's comment, June 13, 1:26 AM
Thats brilliant...
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 8:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:33 AM

unit 1

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 9:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.