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Florida Mayor's Bilingual Push Hits Brick Wall

Florida Mayor's Bilingual Push Hits Brick Wall | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A mayor in Florida's push for to make his city his bilingual was rebuked, but not by the usual suspects.
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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mandy Burris's comment, December 2, 11:47 PM
Another article about genetics and biology! This is so cool to see how the human body can adapt to the different places and things we put ourselves through. Of course it only makes sense that the mutations that allow us to survive in these extreme places would be selected for reproduction.
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 5:37 PM

Charles Darwin's theory on evolution seems to prove to work for the ancestors and natives of Tibetans who for nearly 8,000 years have managed to live in an environment most people would die at. With genetic mutation such as that of the people who live in the Tibetan mountains, Tibetan's have an advantage at living in various different places. That also brings up the questions, if Tibetans are able to live at such a high altitude, are they able to live in low latitudes where the rest of world lives? What would happen to their genetic make-up if that were a possibility? 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:45 PM

This is a fascinating example of evolutionary forces working on the human scale. The Tibetans were found to have a genetic adaptation that allows them to live better at the high elevations they live at. Their mutation stops dangerous blood clots that would otherwise form and make survival in that environment difficult. 

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GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University). 


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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abontempo's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
This is so interesting! I never really thought about how our thanksgiving meal is so different from others around the world!
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2:52 PM

T-giving map stuff...

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

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Marvelous Map of Britain highlights our silliest (and rudest) places

Marvelous Map of Britain highlights our silliest (and rudest) places | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
If you're the kind of person who sniggers at 'Cockfosters' or any place with a butt, shag or knob involved, this novelty map could right up your street (and perhaps the perfect silly Christmas gift).

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 8:14 AM
From Great Butts to Tangley Bottom, this new map of UK highlights their silliest (and rudest) place names...I guess a cartographer/explorer tries to sneak in some subversive fun somewhere as this map shows.  
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Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem

Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A site in the Old City of Jerusalem, known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, has been a flash point since the advent of modern Zionism.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 22, 10:37 PM

There has been turmoil and violence in Jerusalem this month; at it's core, much of the fighting has been around the political control of sacred spaces that are seen as critical to both groups' cultural and religious identity.  This particular sacred place is intertwined with both Judaism as well as Islam, and understanding the current round of violence demands that we understand some of the historical geography of religion in Jerusalem.  To explore more about sacred sites in general as a spatial concept, visit this link


Tagsreligion, culture, Islam, Israel, Palestine, territoriality, political, Middle East.

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Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything

Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most people around the world are pretty bad when it comes to knowing the numbers behind the news. But how issues such as immigration are perceived can shape political opinion and promote misconceptions

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 20, 8:54 AM

Interesting visual representation of language and their relationships.  Language defines us.  It doesn't just give us a way to communicate but it also limits how we define and describe our world.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.

 

Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 1:43 PM

Is this a surprise?

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 5:57 PM

Unit 1-Nature and perspectives on geography

 

This article explains how rural and urban areas are in the same nature. rural lands and urban lands are close or combined with each other though farms. These farms are affecting cities when they are so close from the sharing of resources. Water is a problem in these places through water scarcity. Places already with lack of water now are sharing with farms just outside the city. 

 

This relates to the unit through judging both perspectives or rural and urban societies working and living together. The urban societies are affected especially when water is a problem alone and then has to be shared with farms. People have noticed many farms are near cities with 80 percent of these rural lands near urban civilizations. Although many people have different views on what is considered urban,  and if these farms really are in urban areas. 

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 10:04 PM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 12:30 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the time lapse of a lake in Sao Paulo in Brazil and shows how the water is running low.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows the maps as It is a GPS map and a GIS layering map. This a basic definable part of this unit because of its maps, scale, sense of place, identity, and overall relativity. This is a simple GIS layering map over the Jaguari resovoir.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

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This map of international phone calls explains globalization

This map of international phone calls explains globalization | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The map above shows the volume of phone calls between countries around the world, and it’s one way of measuring information flows around the world—it’s part of an index of global connectedness developed by business researchers and sponsored by shipper DHL.

The index finds that globalization began deepening once again last year after reaching a post-crisis plateau in 2012—but it’s far from the deeply connected world sold by globalization advocates."

 


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Earth’s Soil Is Getting Too Salty for Crops to Grow

Earth’s Soil Is Getting Too Salty for Crops to Grow | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Buildup of salts on irrigated land has already degraded an area the size of France and is causing $27.3 billion annually in lost crops

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Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 5:35 PM

Unit 1-Nature and perspectives on geography

 

This article is about the growing problem of salinization in soil, causing soil that is unable to grow or is toxic to most crops. Corn is one of the few crops that can grow. Irrigation leads to the higher concentrations of salt because of salts in the water left behind after it evaporates. The Indus VAlley of pakistan is suffering from this problem with almost a 50 percent decline in rice production. The Colorado river Basin is also being affected. 

 

This article ties to this unit in connecting the land and soils incapability to grow plants affecting humans. Humans are guilty of the high salt in the soil from use of irrigation to water plants not near water sources. Irrigation helps the plants but the long term affect is decreasing production. The salt concentration is declining food production resulting in millions of dollars lost in affected areas. This proves nature and human productivity are tied closely together, with humans changing and trying to help nature through irrigation, but ultimately hurting the land overtime. 

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 1:03 PM

On this Thanksgiving, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Jon Olaizola's curator insight, November 28, 11:55 AM

You can help!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2:47 PM

Tedx

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 3:31 PM

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2:21 PM

Africa without the Europe's colonization could have led Latin America to a different development. Maybe less countries or more, who knows.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:37 AM

It is fascinating to see how different the political borders of Africa would have been without European colonial influence. One thing this map predicts is that if the Europeans would not have pushed into Africa, Arab and Islamic influences would have filled the void. The huge number of independent states or regions on this map show how large the continent is and how many different ethnic and religious groups there are.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 5:59 PM

I sometimes do question, what would Africa look like today if it weren't colonized by the Europeans. Before the discovery of Africa, Africa was a land that was dominated by wealthy kingdoms that spent most of its time conquering other countries. With the ideology that Africa was a land flowing with milk and honey inhabited by uncivilized human beings, conquering Africa seemed like the ideal thing for European super powers to do in order to exploit the lands natural resource at no cost. If Africa was not colonized by Europeans, Africans would have more access to their own natural resources, and the instability that most of African countries face today would most likely not be in existence.

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Asian Border Disputes

Asian Border Disputes | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Tags: borders, political, conflict, infographic, map.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Asie(s)'s curator insight, November 23, 10:23 PM

A good overview on the matter!

Kevin Barker's curator insight, November 25, 8:20 AM

A great primer for discussions over border disputes.  In this modern geopolitical climate, some of these claims can seem aggressive to say the least.  The strategies/responses can also be very interesting when military options are put aside.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 12:36 PM

I was looking at the disputes between the Paracel Islands, the Spratly Islands, and the Scarborough Shoal. What I notices with all oft he disputes, the land being fought over is all claimed by China but the land location itself is all closer to the country china is disputing it over. For the Paracel Islands, China and Vietnam are in dispute especially after China put 2 oil rigs by their land. The other dispute between the Spratly Islands, China and the Philippines each claim entire ownership of the lands but Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei all claim some part of the islands as well. For the Scarborough Shoal, it is a lot closer to the Philippines than it is to China but China claims it as their own since they discovered the land. Now china has restricted access to the island following a standoff.    

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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…

Via dilaycock, FCHSAPGEO
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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial, historical and cultural components to it...here are some of my favorite teaching resources to use as Thanksgiving approaches."

 

Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.


Via Seth Dixon
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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 12:13 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the consumption of sweet potato pie on thanksgiving in the u.s. it also shows the production of these pies also. It is also interesting how the south is again labeled and stereotyped in a certain way of being irrelevant or redneck.

This map relates to unit 1 because it shows the functional regions of local sweet potato pie production. It also shows the parts of the south as the most consuming people. Again pinning the south as weak and less educated. This is a possible vernacular map also because of that.

Raven Blair's curator insight, December 2, 7:46 PM

The home of the first Thanksgiving, Plymouth County, is one of three of the only places that produces cranberries.It is interesting how Thanksgiving includes multiple assortments of the geography of food production and food consumption.  

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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A Rosetta Stone for a lost language

A Rosetta Stone for a lost language | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Rajesh Rao is fascinated by "the mother of all crossword puzzles": how to decipher the 4000-year-old Indus script. He's enlisting modern computation to try to read this lost language, the key to understanding this ancient civilization.


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Religious persecution on the rise

Religious persecution on the rise | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

On the same day that the news emerged of a Pakistani Christian couple burnt to death in a kiln by enraged Muslim villagers for apparently unwittingly burning the verses of the Koran, Prince Charles was addressing a gathering at the House of Lords on religious freedom.  The future King, who once said that he wished to be Defender of Faith, rather than Defender of the Faith on ascending the throne, made an eloquent plea for religious tolerance at home and across the world.


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Polder and wiser

Polder and wiser | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How long until the robots arrive? AT THE entrance to Hoeve Rosa farm, in the southern Dutch province of Limburg, a sign gives a warning that unmanned machines might...

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Polder and wiser

Polder and wiser | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How long until the robots arrive? AT THE entrance to Hoeve Rosa farm, in the southern Dutch province of Limburg, a sign gives a warning that unmanned machines might...

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