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Kashmir Thwarts India-Pakistan Attempt at Trust - New York Times

Nearly two months into an armed conflict over the disputed territory of Kashmir, India and Pakistan -- the world's newest nuclear powers -- are once again playing the tired roles of time-tested
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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates

Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A former student of mine drew my attention to a recent article in Slate written by Alyssa Pelish and titled 'The Stimulating History of Coffee: Why You Hear This Word Around the World'."

 

Tags:  language, culture, diffusion.

 
Via Seth Dixon
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The World in 2015: Global population and the changing shape of world demographics - YouTube

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.

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10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt

10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
As a British expat who has lived and worked in the U.S. for over five years, I remain very much in favor of embracing the various wonderful nuances this country has to offer. However, there was one aspect of my move that—during the initial settling-in period—I secretly feared: the gradual Americanization of my vocabulary.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 4:21 PM

While this list was created for English speakers in the UK, I will invert the list to show some terms that Americans rarely use, even if we understand their meaning: rubbish, mobile, motorway, petrol, car park, you lot, maths, pavement, football and fizzy drink.  If this interests you so will this list of 10 British insults that American don't understand


Tags: language, culture, English, UK.

tentuseful's comment, January 17, 4:16 AM
Thats stunning
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:07 PM

unit 3

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Here Is The Most Disproportionately Popular Cuisine In Each State

Here Is The Most Disproportionately Popular Cuisine In Each State | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Utah is crazy about Hawaiian food, apparently....

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 9:44 PM

I'm going to a Portuguese bakery now...

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The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs

The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good. Instead, he argues, what we have in America is a nation of places not worth caring about.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 10:57 AM

Kunstler passionately argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems. 


Question to Ponder: How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary?  Warning: He uses some strong language.  


Tagsurban, planning architecture, suburbs, TED, video.

Kevin Barker's curator insight, January 21, 9:02 AM

This could become something of a fixation for me.  Plano TX is seen on many levels of a great suburban city but here is one way it is lacking most.

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 11:21 AM

An important part of the geography of religion is how the non-religious are treated and perceived around the world.  More secular countries tend to be more developed, affluent and wealthy; generally speaking these are the countries that do not believe that morality and a belief in God have to be linked together.  What do you think?  What cultural perspectives shape your thinking?   


Tags: secular, culturereligion, worldwide, perspective.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 19, 11:33 PM
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God Is.'s curator insight, January 20, 7:49 AM

Interesting data in several different ways...Can draw different conclusions from this, and perhaps shed light on things that need to be modified/changed as it pertains to our belief... A balancing act of sorts...Thank you for curating this... Maybe it will help will cure certain beliefs we hold, individually, and collectively...

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10 Territorial Disputes That Mean Your Maps Are Already Wrong

10 Territorial Disputes That Mean Your Maps Are Already Wrong | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
As it stands, there are well over 150 territorial disputes around the globe, some more urgent than others. Here are 10 you need to know about -- and that could redefine the world map.

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Rich nations 'failing to help Syria refugees'

Rich nations 'failing to help Syria refugees' | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rights group says "pitiful" number taken in by wealthy countries, with burden placed mainly on ill-equipped neighbours.

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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.  It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding."

 

Tags: religion, culture, Islam, Iran, Middle East.


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Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:08 AM

Unit 3

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:30 PM

It is interesting to see how the social and cultural factors surrounding Iranian mosques posed barriers to taking these pictures. The pictures show the beauty and colors of these mosques, showing how important they are to their history and society.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 4, 6:43 PM

Often the normal American has trouble understanding what other religions are and mean. Seeing the architecture of that place may help to develop a deeper understanding of the religion. In this case, many Islamic norms can be seen in this mosques, for instance there are no pictures or representation of the human form. Architecture is an important way for religions to express them selves and allow others to learn more about them.

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Mexico Has Brutally Choked Off The Flow Of Undocumented Immigrants Into The U.S.

Mexico Has Brutally Choked Off The Flow Of Undocumented Immigrants Into The U.S. | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Once a pit stop on the long, dangerous trail north to the U.S. border, Tenosique has become ground zero for a remarkably successful push to cut off the flow of undocumented immigrants into the United States."

 

Grupo Beta [in Mexico] was established to provide food and medical assistance to migrants moving through the country to the United States. With facilities across the country along migratory routes, migrants have long become accustomed to seeking out the organization for help.

But since July, activists said that Grupo Beta workers in Tabasco and other border states have begun turning migrants into law enforcement. Several migrants in Tabasco said they had been targeted by law enforcement officials minutes after seeking out mobile Grupo Beta units providing food and water near the border.  The plan had an almost immediate impact.


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The Historical Geography of Whaling

The Historical Geography of Whaling | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Summer 2014 brought a sight that had not been seen since 1941: the Charles W. Morgan leaving the Mystic River for the Atlantic Ocean, stopping at several New England harbors before eventually arriving in New Bedford, Massachusetts where the ship was built in 1841. The Charles W. Morgan is the last remaining wooden whaling ship in the world, and a National Historic Landmark."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2014 4:57 PM

Only two countries today are stilling whaling (Japan and Norway), but the whaling industry was a critical component to the settling of New England.  Check out this Maps 101 podcast for short introduction to the historical geography of New England whaling.  


Tagspodcast, Maps 101, historicalbiogeography.

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Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A sign urging environmental action during a United Nations summit meeting on climate change was placed near a 1,000-year-old geoglyph that is a cultural treasure in Peru. Officials are outraged over the trespassing and the disturbance of the ancient grounds.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2014 5:23 PM

Greenpeace is falling for some of the same social media fails as the selfie generation.  Peruvian authorities are angry that Greenpeace activists damaged a forbidden archeological site that is both a national symbol and sacred site.  UN climate talks are taking place in Peru right now, so this Greenpeace publicity stunt becomes all the more ironic.  The Peruvian government is accusing them of irrevocably damaging the environment at this site.  Here is an article about how the environmental community was impacted by this Greenpeace stunt.


TagsreligionSouth AmericaPeru, environment.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 10:34 AM

This is something that absolutely mortifies me. As the United Nations climate change summit met in Peru, Greenpeace thought to make a stance. Greenpeace decided to trespass onto some of Peru's most sacred, ancient, and mysterious grounds, the Nazca lines. These geoglyphs are thousands of years old, and no one is quite sure what they mean or why they were made. The lines have remained because of the dry, windless climate in the valley allowing for the dirt to remain undisturbed. Greenpeace, without permission, decided to set up fabric lettering in the soil next to one of the most iconic figures. Officials are outraged because not only was it trespassing, but the eco group may have irreversibly damaged the site. Greenpeace responded with a very "sorry not sorry" apology, and Peru is looking towards pressing charges. 


Many remain divided on their outlook on radical environmentalists such as Greenpeace. While they may be spouting good ideas in regards to helping the environment, at what point does it become eco-terrorism? In this instance, the lack of consideration that they have shown towards another country rivals that of the same actions that they themselves are aiming to stop. 

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The Blame for the Charlie Hebdo Murders - The New Yorker

The Blame for the Charlie Hebdo Murders - The New Yorker | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The murders today in Paris are not a result of France’s failure to assimilate two generations of Muslim immigrants from its former colonies.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 10:35 AM

Good article...solid points. 

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After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews

After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Spain's monarchy decimated the Jewish population by expelling, killing or forcibly converting Jews in 1492. Now the country may offer their descendants Spanish citizenship.

 

Tags: Europe, migration, Israel, Spain.


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ibexerain's comment, January 13, 12:05 AM
Astounding...!!
ropesemphasize's comment, January 14, 1:47 AM
Incredible
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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 5:32 PM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 12:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier

White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In the United States, there is a long tradition of trying to draw sharp lines between ethnic groups, but our ancestry is a fluid and complex matter. In recent years geneticists have been uncovering new evidence about our shared heritage, and last week a team of scientists published the biggest genetic profile of the United States to date, based on a study of 160,000 people."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2:44 PM

Race is a cultural construct; even though it is incredibly problematic, it is a powerful way in which we think of who we are and how others think of who we are.    


Questions to Ponder:  What are some problems with putting too much stock in race?  Why does the idea of race still matter so much in the United States? 


Tags: race, historicalthe South, USA, map.

Julie Cidell's curator insight, January 22, 9:35 AM

How do you map something like "race" when it's such a fluid and socially constructed concept?

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 21, 10:55 PM


"Este mapa muestra el Índice de Desarrollo Humano (IDH) de 169 países en el mundo. El IDH es una medida comparativa de la esperanza de vida, alfabetización, educación y nivel de vida de los países en todo el mundo. El IDH establece un mínimo y un máximo para cada dimensión , llamado postes, y luego muestra la posición de cada país con relación a estos valores objetivos, expresados como un valor entre 0 y 1, donde mayor es mejor. El Índice de Desarrollo humano (IDH) mide los avances promedio de un país en tres dimensiones básicas del desarrollo humano: salud, conocimientos y nivel de vida ".

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 22, 6:36 PM

This is really cool.....

 

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 22, 11:56 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

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Dozens of villagers die in attack by Islamic extremists in Nigeria

Dozens of villagers die in attack by Islamic extremists in Nigeria | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Fishing port on shores of Lake Chad attacked by suspected members of Boko Haram who ‘shot people on sight’
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Immigation in the United States

Immigation in the United States | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 2014 10:43 PM

Do you think it's easy to come into the United States "the right way?"  That simply isn't an option that is even remotely available for many would-be migrants. 

Flaviu Fesnic's comment, December 7, 2014 2:25 PM
It's a tough job entering US ! I legally (of course ) tried ten years ago ! The US emabassy in Bucharest refused to give me a visa ! it's so frustrating ! no reason why ...
Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:09 AM

Unit 2

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

Photos that bear witness to modern slavery | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

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The Data-Driven Farm

"Mr. Tom is as much a chief technology officer as he is a farmer. Where his great-great-grandfather hitched a mule, 'we’ve got sensors on the combine, GPS data from satellites, cellular modems on self-driving tractors, apps for irrigation on iPhones,' he said.

The demise of the small family farm has been a long time coming. But for farmers like Mr. Tom, technology offers a lifeline, a way to navigate the boom-and-bust cycles of making a living from the land. It is also helping them grow to compete with giant agribusinesses."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 3, 2014 4:42 PM

The New York Times article associated with the video above offers a great glimpse into the inner works of how agribusiness technologies have transformed the American family farm.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.

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What Maps Can Hide

What Maps Can Hide | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Too often, I find myself looking at this or that new map on the happiest places to live in the United States, the states with the most craft beer, or, more importantly, the least social mobility. I glance at where I live and think, well, it could be worse. At least I don’t live in Alabama. And then I move on.

Maps like these have become ubiquitous—indeed, some media outlets have entire sections devoted to them. But the 50-state map infographic is becoming the new pie chart—overused, often abused, and not always best suited for the task at hand.

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Product of Mexico - Harsh Harvest

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:17 PM

Taking into account the export boom from the US to Mexico its easy to see there were loopholes that were taken to achieve this success. With an increase of almost 3 fold, it is safe to say that much of our product comes from Mexico but at what cost? Farmers and workers in Mexico get paid little to none for the hardships they have to go through just to put some food on the table for their family. Big corporations want to make as much profit as possible, even if that means taking away from those that already have nothing to give. This video exposes all the farmers that are at the crossroads of being forced to do their job and actually having a job

Todd Scalia's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:12 AM

we work the fields for our families. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:36 AM

It’s crazy to see how desperate some of these people are to get working and how much they do for such a little reward. These people are working longer and harder than probably all Americans and they are barely surviving. They work for survival. It’s hard for some of these people to stay healthy, especially in the harsh conditions and tight living spaces that these people have to deal with on an everyday basis.