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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing

27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Tellingly, the bulk of the collection comes from cable TV news.

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 3, 1:39 PM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

Flaviu Fesnic's curator insight, August 6, 2:51 AM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

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Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
People have been farming — and eating — a GMO for thousands of years without knowing it. Scientists have found genes from bacteria in sweet potatoes around the world. So who made the GMO?

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

Yes, the title is somewhat misleading (isn't that almost expected these days?), since humanity has been selectively breeding crops since the first agricultural revolution and genetic alteration can occur independent of human intervention.  Humanity has always been using the best technologies available to improve agricultural practices.  The term GMO though, is usually reserved for scientific, technological modifications that were unimaginable 100 years ago.  

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 7, 12:08 PM

Once again, the term GMO has been used without regard for process.  We need to make sure our students have a clear understanding of what it means for a crop to be "genetically modified" now.  Although I get some eyerolls, this is why I continue to include an origin of agriculture segment in every introductory class I teach..

newgen's comment, July 9, 5:42 AM
thanks for share!
AgroWorld's curator insight, September 2, 1:56 PM

As geography education educator Seth Dixon curates resources that address the agricultural geography standards. Consider following his Scoop.it posts.

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

The four maps in this article highlight many of the demographic issues that are currently impacting Europe.  See also this article showing where in Europe populations are declining and where they are growing.  

 

Tags: Europe, map, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, map archives. 

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Marco Favero's curator insight, July 7, 2:59 PM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

newgen's comment, July 9, 5:40 AM
thanks
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 10, 5:57 AM

ajouter votre perspicacité ...

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Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panama, images, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Jose Soto's insight:

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 12:39 PM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 11:13 AM
another great post by Seth Dixon
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:54 PM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

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Why the Saudis Are Going Solar

Why the Saudis Are Going Solar | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia produces much of its electricity by burning oil, a practice that most countries abandoned long ago, reasoning that they could use coal and natural gas instead and save oil for transportation, an application for which there is no mainstream alternative. Most of Saudi Arabia’s power plants are colossally inefficient, as are its air conditioners, which consumed 70 percent of the kingdom’s electricity in 2013. Although the kingdom has just 30 million people, it is the world’s sixth-largest consumer of oil.Now, Saudi rulers say, things must change. Their motivation isn’t concern about global warming; the last thing they want is an end to the fossil-fuel era. Quite the contrary: they see investing in solar energy as a way to remain a global oil power. The Saudis burn about a quarter of the oil they produce—and their domestic consumption has been rising at an alarming 7 percent a year, nearly three times the rate of population growth.

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, energy, resources, consumption, Middle East, sustainability.


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Peter Phillips's curator insight, July 14, 7:47 AM

Interesting take on improving the sustainability of a resource.

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, July 14, 12:13 PM

A great article discussing energy reform in Saudi Arabia.  Another good source of information about some of the reforms being implemented in the kingdom can be found at this link:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVgWtOeWNgg

 

Interesting to see how this change in energy consumption will effect Saudi politics and the economy. 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 11:15 AM

Good for Saudi Arabia

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OPINION: The cure for Puerto Rico is independence

OPINION: The cure for Puerto Rico is independence | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The financially troubled island now says it is unable to pay an estimated $72 billion debt, casting a pall on bond markets and pension funds. On the surface, Puerto Rico’s debt crisis is one of run-away spending on public welfare, with a diminishing small tax and economic base to support it. However, the island’s troubles are also tied to its commonwealth status: Puerto Rico is part of the United States but it lacks the local autonomy afforded to other U.S. states and electoral representation in Congress.

It is finally time for Puerto Rico to break free. Independence would allow Puerto Ricans to directly address their economic woes, but, perhaps more important, it will grant the island’s 3.5 million inhabitants the right to determine their own destiny. On July 9, the U.S. Court of Appeals in Boston ruled that Puerto Rico couldn’t restructure its own debt. Puerto Rico’s status as a U.S. territory bars the island from requesting bailout funds from other development banks. Independence, nationalists argue, would allow the commonwealth to make these and other autonomous choices.

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

Nothing like an op-ed to get people thinking...this touches on economic, political and population geography. 

 

Tags: Puerto Rico, political, migration, autonomy,  economic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 5:04 PM

Nothing like an op-ed to get people thinking...this touches on economic, political and population geography. 


Tags: Puerto Rico, political, migration, autonomyeconomic.

asli telli's curator insight, August 2, 4:11 AM

Nothing like an op-ed to get people thinking...this touches on economic, political and population geography. 


Tags: Puerto Rico, political, migration, autonomy,  economic.

Dee Dee Deeken's curator insight, August 2, 1:26 PM

Nothing like an op-ed to get people thinking...this touches on economic, political and population geography. 


Tags: Puerto Rico, political, migration, autonomy,  economic.

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Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 19, 9:35 AM

Global population shakeup.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 10:14 AM

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
Jose Soto's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Bob Zavitz's curator insight, August 5, 7:42 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.
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Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources

Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Data is great, but working with numbers can be intimidating. We have more data than ever before that is available to us, and graphs, charts, and spreadsheets are ways that data can be shared. If that data has a spatial element to it, the best way to visualize a large dataset might just be a map."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 3:51 PM

I hope you enjoy this article I wrote about GeoFRED, a way to visualize economic statistics.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicdevelopment, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 28, 12:05 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 4:54 PM

Data, data...its all about data!

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The Blame for the Charlie Hebdo Murders - The New Yorker

The Blame for the Charlie Hebdo Murders - The New Yorker | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The murders today in Paris are not a result of France’s failure to assimilate two generations of Muslim immigrants from its former colonies.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 10:35 AM

Good article...solid points. 

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After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews

After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Spain's monarchy decimated the Jewish population by expelling, killing or forcibly converting Jews in 1492. Now the country may offer their descendants Spanish citizenship.

 

Tags: Europe, migration, Israel, Spain.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 7:29 PM

Can we all agree that a 522 year apology is outdated? Honestly, Karavani, a citizen of Israel who benefits from the new policy, summarized my reaction to this when he stated, “I don't think that anybody owes me anything — definitely [not] if it happened 500 years ago.” The people involved in this situation are dead five times over at least. I think it is time to move on and if you can’t, then you have bigger issues in your life. Personally, it would make more sense for the government to remember past mistakes and learn from them by applying knowledge of discrimination to any issues of discrimination that is currently happening in the country.

 

I kept wondering if giving citizenship so many years later would actually be seen as a justice apology. The citizens aren’t being recognized as Jews. Plus the expense being incurred to even take the test sounds unpleasant given some of the complaints mentioned in the article. I didn’t realize that a large amount of the Israel population would actually leave for Europe. Upon realizing this, I found the trend to be amazing in a world where increased immigration is normally seen in a negative light for the nation who is welcoming the immigrants. Never did I realize that a member of Israel would view it as “a European way — to destroy this country.” I do doubt that was there intent as there are far more effective way to destroy a nation. Yet, when someone is losing a large amount of their population (some of whom speak an almost dead language) I can see how the statement was made. I guess this member of the Israeli population would be considered a person against globalization in this instance.

 

Leaving Israel isn’t a bad decision though. Given the instability in Israel, I think it is great that more immigrants can go someplace else. Furthermore, I think it provides a fantastic opportunity to people, like Karavani, who want better jobs. While it might be sad to see such drastic change for Levy, people can study like his cousin and keep their heritage. The world is a bigger place now that is easily traversed. I think people needed to realize there is no longer one absolute location to live and that isn’t the end of the world. It is just a new way of life.   

Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 16, 9:09 PM

Summary- After almost 550 years, Spain is finally allowing decedents of expelled Jew citizenship. In 1492 Jews were forced to convert, be killed, or flee Spain. A law now grants the Jews descendants citizenship under a draft law by the Spanish Government. 

 

Insight- As explorers of religion in this unit, we ask out selves: Why were the Jews expelled and now let back in so long after? The expulsion was caused by the Spanish Inquisition, a goal to maintain catholic orthodox in spanish kingdoms forcing all Jews out. They are finally let back in after Spain realized  that there is now no reason to keep other people out.

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:25 PM

Unit 3:

Spain debating whether or not they are going to let Jewish people apply to be Spanish citizens. 

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Organizing APHG content

Organizing APHG content | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Digital resources to strengthen the quality and quantity of geography education in classrooms the world over."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 11:54 PM

Since this site is updated daily and organized chronically, finding some of the best posts from the past can be difficult for someone new to the site.  Some of the posts are on current events and not as relevant several years after the fact, but I want to make it easier to find the older posts that are still relevant today more easily accessible.  I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.  Additionally, this Story Map will also guide you on how to get more out of this website.         

  1. Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)
  2. Population and Migration (shortlist)
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)
  4. The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)
  5. Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)
Jill Wallace's curator insight, August 20, 7:32 PM

Thanks Seth! Great Idea!!!

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40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs

40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"It’s not just a sausage in a bun; it’s a beautiful blank canvas. It’s a hot dog, which is a foodstuff eaten worldwide. Here are 40 distinctive varieties from around the globe — from iconic NYC 'dirty water dogs' to fully loaded South American street-cart dogs to Japanese octo-dogs. There is a tubesteak out there for every craving that ever was."


Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 

 

Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 15, 4:36 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tagsfoodculturediffusion, globalization, consumption.

Geography's curator insight, July 6, 2:21 PM

While we often think of the Chicago Dog in the midwest, there's quite a variety out there!  Which would you try and which is your favorite?

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, July 26, 10:24 PM

Seriously......Upton Sinclair eat your heart out. 

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10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project

10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here are 10 facts about poverty in Africa that demonstrate the widespread consequences of poverty that affect education, health, food consumption and more.

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  

 

Tags: Africa, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 12:24 PM

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  


TagsAfrica, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

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Map of just the time zones

Map of just the time zones | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Kind of fun. Branden Rishel mapped just the time zones. No borders or countries for context. In case you're confused and want to know where these lines come from, BBC News made an interactive that explains why time zones are the way they are."


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Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
On July 31st India and Bangladesh will exchange 162 parcels of land, each of which happens to lie on the wrong side of the Indo-Bangladesh border. The end of these enclaves follows an agreement made between India and Bangladesh on June 6th. The territories along the world’s craziest border include the pièce de résistance of strange geography: the world’s only “counter-counter-enclave”: a patch of India surrounded by Bangladeshi territory, inside an Indian enclave within Bangladesh. How did the enclaves come into existence?The enclaves are invisible on most maps; most are invisible on the ground too. But they became an evident problem for their 50,000-odd inhabitants with the emergence of passport and visa controls. Independent India and Bangladesh—part of Pakistan until 1971—each refused to let the other administer its exclaves, leaving their people effectively stateless.According to Reece Jones, a political geographer, the plots were cut from larger territories by treaties signed in 1711 and 1713 between the maharaja of Cooch Behar and the Mughal emperor in Delhi, bringing to an end a series of minor wars.It was partition, the division of India and Pakistan, that turned the enclaves into a no-man’s-land. The Hindu maharaja of Cooch Behar chose to join India in 1949 and he brought with him the ex-Mughal, ex-British possessions he inherited. Enclaves on the other side of the new border were swallowed (but not digested) by East Pakistan, which later became Bangladesh.

 

Tags: borders, geopolitics, political, India, South Asia, Bangladesh.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 22, 12:32 PM
Another great scoop by Seth Dixon
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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

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L.Long's curator insight, July 21, 7:06 PM

mega cities

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2:26 AM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 6:07 AM

mega cities 

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2:35 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religiondiffusion, culture.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:57 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, diffusion, culture.

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How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.

Via Seth Dixon
Jose Soto's insight:

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   

 

Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.

 

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Constantina Vlachou's curator insight, August 7, 11:16 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   

 

Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.

 

Clairelouise's curator insight, August 8, 9:26 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   

 

Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.

 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 11:54 AM

Curto, doce e ao ponto - este vídeo é uma ótima maneira de mostrar as geografias históricas dos principais religiões do mundo. Quais são as barreiras culturais para a difusão de uma dessas religiões particulares? Que fatores geográficos ajudou a facilitar a expansão de uma dessas religiões do mundo?   

 

Tags: religião, difusão, cultura, Cristianismo, Islamismo, Budismo, Hinduísmo, Judaísmo,
unidade 3 cultura.

 

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.
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35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Take a tour through America's immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming

 

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of "inferior" races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America's immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it's still a fundamental truth of the country's history. It's impossible to understand the country today without knowing who's been kept out, who's been let in, and how they've been treated once they arrive.

 

Tags: migration, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 28, 11:52 PM

its a very powerful insight especially with the slave trade. America has always been a country that depended upon immigrants for help. Immigrants have more importance towards this country more than anyone else, this is a raised immigrant nation whether some people like it or not. Some people need to realize that blood sweat and tears have all came from the immigrants, as much as its hard to realize for some people a lot of immigrants have worked hard to build this nation that we call home today.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:19 PM

This article is highly interesting in both historical and social contexts.  The article asserts that the United States is a nation of immigrants and there is really no such thing as just "American".  The article even states that Native Americans themselves, at one point in ancient history, crossed a land bridge that was between Russia and Alaska.  Another interesting point of the article was the fact that many of the Latino immigrants today are actually picking up the English language faster than the European immigrants of old.  Interestingly, this article leads to the conclusion that the "New World" is really comprised of immigrants of the "Old World".

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 10:06 AM

Unit 2 reflection:

I find immigration/migration maps very interesting to study. This particular map really creates a visual description of where the people who make up the United States are really from. Not only can people study their origins, but also their cultures, beliefs, and religions. The combinations of these cultural attributes is what makes America so extremely diverse. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, March 22, 10:24 AM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

 

This picture and article talks about the main use of the agricultural growth in the United States. It shows how most and almost all of the agribusiness is in the growth of feed and food for animals on the ranches rather than humans. The amount of money made is astounding with how far the table tilts toward animal feed.

 

This relates to Human Geography because agriculture is one of the main points. It shows how people use agribusiness and ow it leans more toward the consumption of animals rather than humans. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, May 25, 1:22 PM

This link consists of two maps that show agricultural land use in America. Nearly all of the "breadbasket region" is used not to feed people, but rather to create feed for cows and other animals. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
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Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates

Why the ‘Coffee’ Words Are Not Cognates | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A former student of mine drew my attention to a recent article in Slate written by Alyssa Pelish and titled 'The Stimulating History of Coffee: Why You Hear This Word Around the World'."

 

Tags:  language, culture, diffusion.

 
Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:15 PM

unit 2

Tyler Anson's curator insight, February 23, 10:41 AM

This article also shows the diffusion of language. The word "coffee' has diffused and although it is spelled differently in different languages, it pronounced in almost the exact same way. This goes to show how different languages most likely diffused from the same common ancestor langauge.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, February 24, 9:45 PM

The word "coffee" is a loan word that has been borrowed by languages for centuries. It is sometimes mistakenly called a cognate, but is actually a simple sound alike because it does not come from a common language root. A cognate always, always a word that comes from a common language root. "Coffee" is borrowed and does not meet the standards to be a cognate.


Words diffused along trade routes as people would  travel from place to place and share the names of items they wished to sell. Before reliable travel, the names would change from place to place as people remembered them differently or pronounced them differently according to the languages.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Southmoore AP Human Geography
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The World in 2015: Global population and the changing shape of world demographics - YouTube

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.

Via Mr. David Burton
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