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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Celebratory South Sudan Prepares For Independence : NPR

After it declares independence on Saturday, South Sudan will face a challenge in developing good relations with the north after years of conflict.


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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 6, 3:26 PM

The relative location of these protests are what is important in the OCLP movement. The protest are no longer contained to the Victoria Park, the are popping up in intersections and seriously disrupting the status quo of every day life in Hong Kong. The geography of these protest illustrate how different and important the OCLP movement may be. This movement shows how geography can help explain social movements. Because the OCLP movement is popping up in areas where no other protest have occurred, it is hinting to the possible large scale influence the movement might have.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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The Newest Countries in the world

The Newest Countries in the world | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Will Scotland follow the same fate as any of the other young nations in the world? Perhaps, but probably not. A glance down the list of the nine newest sovereign states below reveals that each situation is unique: It's hard to fully equate Scotland's situation with that of Slovakia, let alone with East Timor.

Even so, a glance back at history does show that the world's borders are changing more than we might appreciate: And the changes can sometimes take some time to settle."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 17, 12:47 PM

unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, September 18, 12:20 PM

APHG U4

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 29, 4:57 AM
The Newest Countries in the world
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Scotland's Decision

Scotland's Decision | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
From Catalonia to Kurdistan, nationalist and separatist movements in Europe and beyond are watching the Scottish independence referendum closely.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 2:50 PM

This issue reverberates on many different scales.  As the video embedded in this article demonstrates,  Scotland's choice on September 18th would obviously impact the local region as some seek to use Scottish history as a rationale to reshape the current political and cultural identity of the region.  Some of the votes are already in and Scottish independence would not only have the potential to reshape the UK and EU, but it could also add some fervor to the various other separatist movements around the world, such as Catalonia.  


Tags: devolutionhistorical, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, September 13, 12:00 PM

Compare and contrast Scotland's bid for independence with events leading to American independence. How does a culture decide to change its political geography?

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 11:36 AM

Scotland, the site of nationalist and separatist movements, is one to watch as they vote. What the ramifications would be are yet to be seen

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Scottish Independence

"Scotland is about to vote on whether to secede from the UK. There are solid arguments on both sides."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 1:04 PM

Admittedly, this video is filled with stereotypes, bad words and a strong political bias all delivered in John Oliver's trademark style--it's also filled with incorrect statements which I hope most people can recognize as humor, but it captures college students' attention.  If, however, you are looking for a more insightful piece, I recommend Jeffrey Sach's article titled "The Price of Scottish Independence," or this summary of the 9 issues that would confront an independent Scotland.  Independence in Europe today doesn't mean what it used to, and this vote will be fascinating regardless of the outcome.    


Tags: devolution, supranationalism, politicalEurope, UK.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, September 19, 4:53 PM

The Vote is in

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What we need to contain ebola - Indianapolis Star

What we need to contain ebola - Indianapolis Star | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
What we need to contain ebola
Indianapolis Star
And unless we invest more resources in fighting it — and coordinate the response across countries — the outbreak will spread further. If that happens, economic and political chaos could follow.
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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, Jose Soto
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This Is What Gaza Looks Like From Space Right Now

This Is What Gaza Looks Like From Space Right Now | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have shared some incredible space photos with the Twitterverse -- from aerial views of Southern Lights to even out-of-this-world selfies.

But this week, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Ge...

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 8:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

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The Next America

The Next America | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County

A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
People are leaving Minneapolis for Florida, Detroit for the suburbs, and Washington for New York.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 8:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U7

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35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis

35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

At least 35 small pyramids, along with graves, have been discovered clustered closely together at a site called Sedeinga in Sudan.

 

Discovered between 2009 and 2012, researchers are surprised at how densely the pyramids are concentrated.

 

They date back to a time when a kingdom named Kush flourished in Sudan. Kush shared a border with Egypt and, later on, the Roman Empire. The desire of the kingdom's people to build pyramids was apparently influenced by Egyptian funerary architecture.

 

Because it lasted for hundreds of years they built more, more, more pyramids and after centuries they started to fill all the spaces that were still available in the necropolis." [See Photos of the Newly Discovered Pyramids]


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Sudan and South Sudan sign non-aggression pact

Sudan and South Sudan sign non-aggression pact | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Khartoum and Juba sign memorandum of understanding regarding disputed border, as talks continue over oil pipeline fees.

 

For an article pointing to some of the factors that might undermine this peace agreement, see: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/11/world/africa/sudan-and-south-sudan-edge-closer-to-brink-in-oil-dispute.html?ref=jeffreygettleman


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Sudan country profile

Sudan country profile | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Provides an overview, basic information and key events for this African country
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, September 17, 9:55 AM

This is a great way for students to explore their "sense of place."

I love this game!

 

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Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Henry Monterroso is a foreigner in his own country. Raised in California from the age of 5, he was deported to Mexico in 2011 and found himself in a land he barely knew. But the 34-year-old now supervises five employees amid rows of small cubicles who spend eight hours a day dialing numbers across the United States. He is among thousands of deported Mexicans who are finding refuge in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English — some hardly speak Spanish — they converse with American consumers who buy gadgets, have questions about warrantees or complain about overdue deliveries."


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 1:11 PM

Globalization has allowed places like the Philippines and India to directly participate in American business despite how removed they are from the US and how different the cultures are. However, northern Mexico's position along the border offers the chance to provide foreign support with less logistical problems. While getting a job in one of the call centers mentioned in the article hardly makes up for being deported from the country they were raised in, deportees can make use of their cultural and practical knowledge to find work opportunities in their new home. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 6, 3:45 PM

When it comes to deportation, its usually a loss win situation. But in the case of Mexicans who once lived a life on US soil from since birth and having been deported later on in life, adjusting to a new life in a new world is challenging. The comfort of being able to work in an environment that reminds them of being back home eliviates the agony of being separated from their family back in the US. The outsourced phone companies give these deported individual an opportunity to be able to participate in a life they once lived by being able to interact with Americans. While they make subsequently less than what they were making in the states, the opportunity of being able to work in a foreign land is one that they are forever grateful for.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 10:49 PM

This article is similar to the topic of outsourcing jobs to the United states, only it is the reverse, with deportees being giving jobs at call centers in the city of Tijuana. It brings up the topic of culture shock and the differences between Mexican and United States Economies.

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

Via Javier Marrero Acosta

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 6, 3:03 PM

It is sad to see the images of these people, who are being affected directly with this virus. It is easy for someone to disregard this epidemic because it is not directly in front of them. Ebola is an issue that everyone should be informed on. Citizens of every country should be well informed on how to keep viruses such as this from spreading.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, October 6, 3:04 PM

The Ebola outbreak of 2014 has been one of the worst outbreaks in a while. People are dying left and right because of this terrible disease. As stated in this video, it tells us that most of the Ebola outbreaks have been occurring in Africa, specifically on the borders. This may be helping Ebola spread faster and faster. With the disease being on the borders, I believe that this may be harmful to many individuals. For one thing, there are many people who cross borders all the time. Therefore, if they come into contact with someone who is infected, the chances are high that the will eventually carry the disease as well. Geographical factors are taken into play with diseases as strong as Ebola.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 3:08 PM

It is very sad watching knowing how it took to so long to get Ebola out to the public and make it known of the very spreadable virus. It’s obvious how since the US can be at risk of getting the virus in our country they now want to make it very known and for people to be cautious of the idea that Ebola can eventually be in the US and spread. We should have been cautious of the virus many years ago, but the rate of the virus spreading, sky rocketed just this year. It’s obvious why it took so many years for the Ebola virus to be known, since it was just known for it to have been in a particular Sierra Leon and Liberia. Since it has spread from there to the border of Guinea and now potentially going to different parts of the world there is no question why there is a health scare in many countries.

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Mapping software helping Wendy's select best locations for restaurants - Columbus Dispatch

Mapping software helping Wendy's select best locations for restaurants - Columbus Dispatch | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Mapping software helping Wendy's select best locations for restaurants
Columbus Dispatch
The Wendy's human-resources department is using mapping data to learn about wage requirements and available workers, he said.
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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 2, 9:16 AM

This article from the Economist is dated since Mr. Modi is now the prime minister of India, but this analysis of how caste was used as a political asset in the election is a timely reminder that while the caste system has been officially abolished, the cultural ripples are still being felt today in a myriad of ways that impact social interactions (marriage, jobs, etc.). 


Tagsfolk cultures, culture, development, Indiasocioeconomic, economic, poverty, gender.

Anil Panpher's curator insight, July 26, 11:49 AM

Our leaders brings up the subject for their own benefits which refresh the memories of the public, knowingly -unknowingly. The sad part is that though the benefits are short lived but the memories remain there for long. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U3

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 4:48 PM

Example of "access", or lack thereof, for North America unit.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:51 AM

APHG-U2 & U6

Roman Mirando's curator insight, August 21, 10:21 AM

I do not want to use public bathrooms in the first place but this makes me want to not use them more. It is frightening that three children die every minute because of poor sanitation. Also, 1.5 million children die every year because of poor sanitation. These facts are so horrific and now I am going to make sure I am sanitized.

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Linda Denty's curator insight, August 5, 6:42 PM

As Seth Dixson says, maps only tell a part of a story, but this may assist as part of an overall understanding of the history of the area.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 8:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 11, 9:16 AM

Both History and Geography explained in these maps