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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek

World's Fastest-Shrinking Countries: Populations in decline - BusinessWeek | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
While the rest of the world's population grows, these 25 nations with more than a million residents will see their populations fall dramatically by the year 2050...

Via Wanah Ibrahim, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Rich nations 'failing to help Syria refugees'

Rich nations 'failing to help Syria refugees' | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rights group says "pitiful" number taken in by wealthy countries, with burden placed mainly on ill-equipped neighbours.

Via Mr. David Burton
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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.  It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding."

 

Tags: religion, culture, Islam, Iran, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 10, 11:14 AM

Islamic art is full of brilliant patterns and colors and most historic art is symmetrical.  These pictures are absolutely beautiful.   

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 11:08 AM

Unit 3

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 1:30 PM

It is interesting to see how the social and cultural factors surrounding Iranian mosques posed barriers to taking these pictures. The pictures show the beauty and colors of these mosques, showing how important they are to their history and society.

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Mexico Has Brutally Choked Off The Flow Of Undocumented Immigrants Into The U.S.

Mexico Has Brutally Choked Off The Flow Of Undocumented Immigrants Into The U.S. | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Once a pit stop on the long, dangerous trail north to the U.S. border, Tenosique has become ground zero for a remarkably successful push to cut off the flow of undocumented immigrants into the United States."

 

Grupo Beta [in Mexico] was established to provide food and medical assistance to migrants moving through the country to the United States. With facilities across the country along migratory routes, migrants have long become accustomed to seeking out the organization for help.

But since July, activists said that Grupo Beta workers in Tabasco and other border states have begun turning migrants into law enforcement. Several migrants in Tabasco said they had been targeted by law enforcement officials minutes after seeking out mobile Grupo Beta units providing food and water near the border.  The plan had an almost immediate impact.


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The Historical Geography of Whaling

The Historical Geography of Whaling | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Summer 2014 brought a sight that had not been seen since 1941: the Charles W. Morgan leaving the Mystic River for the Atlantic Ocean, stopping at several New England harbors before eventually arriving in New Bedford, Massachusetts where the ship was built in 1841. The Charles W. Morgan is the last remaining wooden whaling ship in the world, and a National Historic Landmark."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 4:57 PM

Only two countries today are stilling whaling (Japan and Norway), but the whaling industry was a critical component to the settling of New England.  Check out this Maps 101 podcast for short introduction to the historical geography of New England whaling.  


Tagspodcast, Maps 101, historicalbiogeography.

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Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A sign urging environmental action during a United Nations summit meeting on climate change was placed near a 1,000-year-old geoglyph that is a cultural treasure in Peru. Officials are outraged over the trespassing and the disturbance of the ancient grounds.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 5:23 PM

Greenpeace is falling for some of the same social media fails as the selfie generation.  Peruvian authorities are angry that Greenpeace activists damaged a forbidden archeological site that is both a national symbol and sacred site.  UN climate talks are taking place in Peru right now, so this Greenpeace publicity stunt becomes all the more ironic.  The Peruvian government is accusing them of irrevocably damaging the environment at this site.  Here is an article about how the environmental community was impacted by this Greenpeace stunt.


TagsreligionSouth AmericaPeru, environment.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 10:34 AM

This is something that absolutely mortifies me. As the United Nations climate change summit met in Peru, Greenpeace thought to make a stance. Greenpeace decided to trespass onto some of Peru's most sacred, ancient, and mysterious grounds, the Nazca lines. These geoglyphs are thousands of years old, and no one is quite sure what they mean or why they were made. The lines have remained because of the dry, windless climate in the valley allowing for the dirt to remain undisturbed. Greenpeace, without permission, decided to set up fabric lettering in the soil next to one of the most iconic figures. Officials are outraged because not only was it trespassing, but the eco group may have irreversibly damaged the site. Greenpeace responded with a very "sorry not sorry" apology, and Peru is looking towards pressing charges. 


Many remain divided on their outlook on radical environmentalists such as Greenpeace. While they may be spouting good ideas in regards to helping the environment, at what point does it become eco-terrorism? In this instance, the lack of consideration that they have shown towards another country rivals that of the same actions that they themselves are aiming to stop. 

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Why Does Earth Have Deserts?


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Diane Johnson's curator insight, December 16, 8:08 AM

Nicely aligned to MS Earth science 

Catherine Buckman's curator insight, December 16, 2:22 PM

Interesting short video  explaining Hadley Cells and why the earth rain forests on Equator and deserts above and below. 

Gordon de Snoo's curator insight, December 16, 7:05 PM

Good explaination

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Visualizing Urban Change

Visualizing Urban Change | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed.  We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities such as [pictured above] Cincinnati, Ohio."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 11:33 AM

It's ironic that I feel more accustomed to exploring Cincinnati, OH on foot than I do Providence, RI.  Although I drive in downtown Providence regularly, I seldom have a reason to walk and explore it.  In my yearly visits to Cincinnati to score the AP Human Geography exams, I'm outside my hometown and away from my typical routine. That helps me feel more like a flâneur, to stroll the streets and explore the urban landscape.  This set of 7 before and after images shows Midwestern cities (Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Columbus) lets you digitally analyze the last 70 years of urban morphology.  Click here for a gallery 7 of cities in Texas and Oklahoma


Questions to Ponder: What are the biggest changes you see for the 1950 to today?  How are the land uses difference?  Has the density changed?  Do any of urban models help us understand these cities?


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical, geospatial, urban models, APHG.

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A Tweet On Women's Veils, Followed By Raging Debate In Saudi Arabia

A Tweet On Women's Veils, Followed By Raging Debate In Saudi Arabia | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A prominent ultra-conservative figure says face veils for women are not mandatory. Now everyone is weighing in on the hottest topic in the kingdom.

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 1:03 PM

On this Thanksgiving, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Jon Olaizola's curator insight, November 28, 11:55 AM

You can help!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2:47 PM

Tedx

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 3:31 PM

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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Dozens of villagers die in attack by Islamic extremists in Nigeria

Dozens of villagers die in attack by Islamic extremists in Nigeria | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Fishing port on shores of Lake Chad attacked by suspected members of Boko Haram who ‘shot people on sight’
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Immigation in the United States

Immigation in the United States | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 10:43 PM

Do you think it's easy to come into the United States "the right way?"  That simply isn't an option that is even remotely available for many would-be migrants. 

Flaviu Fesnic's comment, December 7, 2:25 PM
It's a tough job entering US ! I legally (of course ) tried ten years ago ! The US emabassy in Bucharest refused to give me a visa ! it's so frustrating ! no reason why ...
Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 11:09 AM

Unit 2

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

Photos that bear witness to modern slavery | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

Via Mr. David Burton
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The Data-Driven Farm

"Mr. Tom is as much a chief technology officer as he is a farmer. Where his great-great-grandfather hitched a mule, 'we’ve got sensors on the combine, GPS data from satellites, cellular modems on self-driving tractors, apps for irrigation on iPhones,' he said.

The demise of the small family farm has been a long time coming. But for farmers like Mr. Tom, technology offers a lifeline, a way to navigate the boom-and-bust cycles of making a living from the land. It is also helping them grow to compete with giant agribusinesses."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 3, 4:42 PM

The New York Times article associated with the video above offers a great glimpse into the inner works of how agribusiness technologies have transformed the American family farm.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.

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What Maps Can Hide

What Maps Can Hide | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Too often, I find myself looking at this or that new map on the happiest places to live in the United States, the states with the most craft beer, or, more importantly, the least social mobility. I glance at where I live and think, well, it could be worse. At least I don’t live in Alabama. And then I move on.

Maps like these have become ubiquitous—indeed, some media outlets have entire sections devoted to them. But the 50-state map infographic is becoming the new pie chart—overused, often abused, and not always best suited for the task at hand.

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Product of Mexico - Harsh Harvest

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 13, 3:17 PM

Taking into account the export boom from the US to Mexico its easy to see there were loopholes that were taken to achieve this success. With an increase of almost 3 fold, it is safe to say that much of our product comes from Mexico but at what cost? Farmers and workers in Mexico get paid little to none for the hardships they have to go through just to put some food on the table for their family. Big corporations want to make as much profit as possible, even if that means taking away from those that already have nothing to give. This video exposes all the farmers that are at the crossroads of being forced to do their job and actually having a job

Todd Scalia's curator insight, December 14, 1:12 AM

we work the fields for our families. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, December 17, 11:36 AM

It’s crazy to see how desperate some of these people are to get working and how much they do for such a little reward. These people are working longer and harder than probably all Americans and they are barely surviving. They work for survival. It’s hard for some of these people to stay healthy, especially in the harsh conditions and tight living spaces that these people have to deal with on an everyday basis. 

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10 vivid maps of Earth: Matter of perspective

10 vivid maps of Earth: Matter of perspective | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Global maps have a remarkable ability to put things in perspective. Ever since the Apollo 17 astronauts snapped the famous photo called "Blue Marble," our fragile place in the cosmos has been cast in a new light. Now with more sophisticated satellite imagery, we can view Earth from space in more enlightening ways that expand our understanding of the planet.

Here are 10 vivid maps by NASA that might just change how you look at the world. (Text: Bryan Nelson)

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U.S. and Cuba's Rocky Relations

"President Obama announced on December 17 that the United States will resume diplomatic relations with Cuba after more than 50 years of antagonism. Bloomberg's Sam Grobart recaps the standoff between the two nations, and explains why the icy relationship has begun to thaw."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 18, 12:38 PM

By now I'm sure you've heard the news that the United States is seeking to normalize relations with Cuba and politicians are reacting to this news in diverse ways.  Some see this as a way for the United States to stick it to Russia (which is going through it's on troubles--more on that in the future). This video gives a quick rundown of the history of Cold War tensions between these two neighbors.   


Tags: Cuba, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Sometimes, rehabilitating a rough neighborhood is a tough process. But in one West Coast American city, it was as simple as adding a Buddha statue.  Since the statue's installation, a street corner has been transformed from a notorious eyesore to a daily prayer spot for local Vietnamese Buddhists.  For this Geo Quiz, we're looking for the city where this shrine is located — can you name it?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 7:51 AM

This podcast is a great glimpse into an urban transformation that took place without any central planning nor can the changes be classified as gentrification. 


Tags: neighborhood, place, culture, economic, urban.

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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Mandy Burris's comment, December 2, 11:47 PM
Another article about genetics and biology! This is so cool to see how the human body can adapt to the different places and things we put ourselves through. Of course it only makes sense that the mutations that allow us to survive in these extreme places would be selected for reproduction.
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 5:37 PM

Charles Darwin's theory on evolution seems to prove to work for the ancestors and natives of Tibetans who for nearly 8,000 years have managed to live in an environment most people would die at. With genetic mutation such as that of the people who live in the Tibetan mountains, Tibetan's have an advantage at living in various different places. That also brings up the questions, if Tibetans are able to live at such a high altitude, are they able to live in low latitudes where the rest of world lives? What would happen to their genetic make-up if that were a possibility? 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:45 PM

This is a fascinating example of evolutionary forces working on the human scale. The Tibetans were found to have a genetic adaptation that allows them to live better at the high elevations they live at. Their mutation stops dangerous blood clots that would otherwise form and make survival in that environment difficult. 

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GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University). 


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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abontempo's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
This is so interesting! I never really thought about how our thanksgiving meal is so different from others around the world!
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2:52 PM

T-giving map stuff...

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

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Marvelous Map of Britain highlights our silliest (and rudest) places

Marvelous Map of Britain highlights our silliest (and rudest) places | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
If you're the kind of person who sniggers at 'Cockfosters' or any place with a butt, shag or knob involved, this novelty map could right up your street (and perhaps the perfect silly Christmas gift).

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 8:14 AM
From Great Butts to Tangley Bottom, this new map of UK highlights their silliest (and rudest) place names...I guess a cartographer/explorer tries to sneak in some subversive fun somewhere as this map shows.