Mr. Soto's Human ...
Follow
Find tag "population"
1.6K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2:21 PM

With food scarcity on the rise and population growth rising just as fast, the Sahel is in the middle of a huge dilemma that sees their already limited resources being stretched even further in order to feed their people, along with the issue of global warming, the Sahel must find a way to increase their food production. With population growing and the food production not climbing along with it, it will drive up the prices of the food and that does not bode well for the already struggling people of Sahel.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 11:09 PM

This article discuses the increasing problem within Africa's Sahel, the increasing lack of food. The real cause of this is the fact the area is under constant strain both from nature as well as human conflict. As wars and conflicts continue more and more refugees are driven from their homes. This means less working on farms as well as more hungry people occupying this dry region. Unfortunately the way to solve this crises is to end the fighting which is not only incredibly difficult but bordering on impossible.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:57 AM

Several factors are posing a threat to life in the Sahel. The growing population is outpacing their food sources, and political instability and environmental change are adding to the tension. This region is home to not only the poorest nations but to some of the fastest growing populations in the world. While the situation in the region is certainly a problem, it shows that it will likely only get worse over time as the population continues to grow and food gets more scarce.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

Younger Africa

Younger Africa | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Soto from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Garinger APHUGE
Scoop.it!

China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Ms. Carter
more...
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"If you think the United States is every immigrant's dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013. But relatively, it's upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report 'Trends in International Migrant Stock.'  Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.  Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That's compared to 14.3 percent in the United States." 

 

Tags: migration, population, USA, Australia, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 10:15 PM

Unit 2 Population and Migration

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 11:23 AM

Although the United States is home to the most foreign-born people, the percentage is not as high as you would think. In terms of the percentage of people that are foreign-born, the United States ranks only 65th worldwide. So, although there are many immigrants, there are even more non-immigrants. Immigrants make up 25.1% of new Zealand and 20.7% of Canada, compared to 14.3% in the United States. For Australia, the UK remains its largest immigrant source and its Asian population has also grown at a steady pace over the last several decades. As it stands, both Sweden and Ireland's populations comprise more foreign-born people than the United States too. There has also been a surge of Muslims into Ireland, now constituting 1.1% of the population. Nations are attracting immigrants by offering cash for citizenship and by offering lower taxes. The United States' largest attraction is that it is the land of the free where anybody can rise to power. This freedom makes it the best country in the world and that will continue to attract immigrants from all over the world no matter where they come from.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 11:41 PM

While the US is often thought of as a major immigrant destination, it is interesting to see the places that experience higher immigration rates. Places like Canada and New Zealand have surprising higher rates than the US, and it is still surprising to see that recent Australian policy was so openly racist.  

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 11:05 AM

The extremely young median age seen across Africa hints at the problems found throughout the continent. This demographic factor suggests that there are other political, economic, and cultural problems that are influencing these young ages. It shows that most people do not live long lives, and even the older countries on the continent are younger than most other places. The only other place with low ages are the Middle East and Central Asia, and even their populations are several years older than the African continent.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Seth Dixon, Fortunato Navarro Sanz, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 10:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 7:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

Rescooped by Jose Soto from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 9:44 AM

This video shows how the populations of each country  are  increasing and decreasing in a very unique way. It explains how the populations are increasing and decreasing as the years go on.  It also shows that the death rates and the birth rates are  being combined to make the true populations as accurate as possible.

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 9:13 PM

This video is good at helping people better visualize population because you can easily see the difference of each continent. It shows how the population started small and rapidly expanded because of the agricultural and industrial revolution and decrease in deaths making it and the births unstablized. It even goes on to talk about the future population and how it is believed that the population won't continue to grow rapidly but once again stabalize.

Rescooped by Jose Soto from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Seth Dixon, Fortunato Navarro Sanz, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 10:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 7:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s.