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A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County

A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
People are leaving Minneapolis for Florida, Detroit for the suburbs, and Washington for New York.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 5:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U7

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 30, 8:50 PM

This is an excellent podcast with many geographic strands running through it. 

Eli Levine's curator insight, May 31, 9:47 AM

Personally, I'm a little resentful that our money is being used to finance Chinese firms.  I'm also not happy that the Chinese aren't using local labor, which would boost economic activity in African societies.  I'm surprised if that's not more of a sore point for the people who live in these societies.

 

But anyway.

 

If we weren't so committed to spreading our political "religion" of democracy and Liberal values, we may have a shot at securing Africa for ourselves.  A pity that we're not as competitive a country as China.  However, if China wants to play international empire, I say let them.  They'll either do a better job than we've done or they'll be as corrupt and exploitative as we were and, thus, end their tenure on "top".  So long as we're able to defend ourselves over here, I see no reason to challenge the artificial empire of China.  That's just my interpretation of history.  Take from it what you will.

 

Think about it.

Bob Manning's curator insight, June 1, 8:43 AM

For Africa to develop, they need a better infrastructure.  China's investment in this area is allowing them access to the huge reserves of resources and growing labor pool.  Is this a repeat of colonialism?  Is there a way to do this in a sustainable manner that is mutually beneficial to both the Chinese and the African countries?

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines.

 

I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications. 


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The Crew's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:18 AM

This is mainly about migration in the states . There is alot of movement that goes unseen . People move for better jobs and opertunities also people move for their jobs. People even move in the same county just differnt location. Many people leave to go to the big cities . -Landon ;) 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 6:32 AM


I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:36 AM

This map makes sense. Most of the areas in blue are the areas which are filled with diversity and mixed cultures. The areas in red or more rural or subarb areas which probably are filled with (not all) but lots of racist people who wouldn't normally accept mixed groups. This map kind of tells a lot about politics too, because most of where the migrants are settling is normally where a lot of Democrats tend to be, vs. the red and ALSO, the areas with neither blue or red, tend to vote more Republican. I also think it's interesting to see how the people who are mostly coming in our scattered around, but most stayed in the middle or east coast of the map. And the red areas are the west coast and the southern part of the east coap and the map.

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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 7:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 7:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:08 PM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world. 

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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 6:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 11:56 AM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 5:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Mapping migration-China and India

Mapping migration-China and India | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Where are the world's biggest Chinese and Indian immigrant communities? MORE Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France, with some to be found in almost every country.

 

The two most populous countries in the world, India and China, are mentioned frequently when teaching population geography.  However, it is typical in the United States to pass over these countries when discussing migration; this graphic shows the diasporas are quite extensive and highly influential. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 8, 2012 7:47 PM
I wonder if improvements in communication technology and transportation may hinder many immigrants ability to gradually integrate into the nations they have migrated to and thus create demographically distinct areas.
Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:41 PM

Unit 2

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Interactive maps: Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps: Mexico-USA migration channels | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

This is an excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 24, 2012 10:28 AM
For the majority of regions the migration percentages are seemingly obvious and to be expected. However, am surprised to see a region such as Guerrero have a high concentration of relocation to Raleigh, NC. Also Guerrero seems unique where it has no clear dominant destination compared to many of its neighbors. Outside of Chicago (1) the next four cities are essentially receiving equal migration.
Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:35 PM

This map shows  some of the flows of migration out of Mexico into the US. Provides insight on the immigrant migration and where there are large concentrations of immigrants. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 12:30 PM

These maps show where Mexicans are migrating to in the United States and their state of origin through consulate registration. Though there is an obvious large amount of migration to the border states of Texas, Arizona, California, and New Mexico, there is a significant amount of migration to other, more distant states, particularly from more Southern Mexican states. For example, the top three cities visited by Mexicans of Chiapas are Raleigh, SC; Atlanta, GA; and Orlando, FL. Additionally, large numbers of people from Guerrero and Puebla are heading to Chicago and New York City respectively.

 

These maps are interesting and it is likely that the high migratory numbers to far away American cities are an indication of family and community bonds established in these cities, there could be a number of other factors which contribute to these figures.

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 8:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 7:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.