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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 30, 11:50 PM

This is an excellent podcast with many geographic strands running through it. 

Eli Levine's curator insight, May 31, 12:47 PM

Personally, I'm a little resentful that our money is being used to finance Chinese firms.  I'm also not happy that the Chinese aren't using local labor, which would boost economic activity in African societies.  I'm surprised if that's not more of a sore point for the people who live in these societies.

 

But anyway.

 

If we weren't so committed to spreading our political "religion" of democracy and Liberal values, we may have a shot at securing Africa for ourselves.  A pity that we're not as competitive a country as China.  However, if China wants to play international empire, I say let them.  They'll either do a better job than we've done or they'll be as corrupt and exploitative as we were and, thus, end their tenure on "top".  So long as we're able to defend ourselves over here, I see no reason to challenge the artificial empire of China.  That's just my interpretation of history.  Take from it what you will.

 

Think about it.

Bob Manning's curator insight, June 1, 11:43 AM

For Africa to develop, they need a better infrastructure.  China's investment in this area is allowing them access to the huge reserves of resources and growing labor pool.  Is this a repeat of colonialism?  Is there a way to do this in a sustainable manner that is mutually beneficial to both the Chinese and the African countries?

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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, May 25, 6:04 PM

Where there is a need there is a way.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 12:23 PM

This article shows how parts of the world plays host to some of the more dangerous industries in existence because they are desperate for jobs and will take any work that comes their way. The ship-breakers are mostly men that work to recycle retired cargo ships. This job is extraordinary dangerous due to the fact that the ships are built not to be taken apart. We can see the lack of development in some parts of the world through this industry's presence in southwest Asia. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, June 4, 9:28 PM

Despite massive advances in transporting goods rapidly around our ever increasing connected world, little thought is spared for how we mamage the waste stream. MEDC benefitf rom accessing the range of goods but LEDC have to deal with the dismantling of the transport modes. 

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NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 9:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 11:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization