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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 5:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 7:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 8:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

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NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 6:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 8:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 10:38 AM

Potatoes were very important in the Colombian Exchange, which was the exchange of plants and animals to and from different lands where they are not native to.  Today, the potato is the fifth most important crop in the world.  Food is deeply routed in culture and this massive exchange changed societies.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 6:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 6:41 PM

Nós somos aquilo que comemos ...

Stuart Shapiro's curator insight, June 25, 5:41 AM

With some drinking thrown in for good measure."

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 9:26 AM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

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Seeds of change in rice-growing country

Seeds of change in rice-growing country | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
A group of farmers in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, is exploring ways to market biodiesel fuel made from sunflower seeds, which many consumers are shunning over radiation fears. ...

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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 


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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 7:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 7:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:08 PM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world.