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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

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Interactive maps: Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps: Mexico-USA migration channels | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

This is an excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Grant Graves's curator insight, September 11, 7:39 PM

Mexico is the largest source of immigrants to the United States. In this way, tens of thousands of Mexicans citizens become American citizens every year, making up a larger and larger percentage of of the US population. However, at the same time, many Mexicans are unable to immigrate to the US due to quotas and other immigration laws. In this way, many Mexican Citizens have no choice but to stay in Mexico or cross the border illegally. I believe that the US should remove quotas and many immigration laws. If this could be done, citizenship could be given to all who want it, making more US citizens and stimulating the US economy by bringing in more jobs and tax dollars. This is due to the simple fact that illegal immigrants do not or cannot pay taxes.

Cam Morford's curator insight, October 13, 10:14 PM

Very interesting article and map regarding Mexican migration.  I'm not very familiar with Mexican states, provinces, or cities, but someone who is would find this article interesting.  It talks about each province in Mexico, how many people emigrate away from there, and where they immigrate to. 

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, October 14, 10:51 PM

This relates o the topic that we are talking about in class because it has to do with migration. This topic is showing us how many people from Mexico come to the US especially more from Morelos. I didn't think that most Mexicans would come from that sate. That's what makes it interesting because I thought that more people would migrate to the US from other parts of Mexico. Like i know a lot of people from here in Longmont who are mostly from Durango and even from Guanajuato, from where i am from. My dad actually migrated from Mexico to the US and well basically i did too as well as my mom except for my sister. My dad wanted to Migrate here so that he could have a better job and life for him and us. It sucks how the number of migrants from Mexico have slowed down, because most of the undocumented people and just the ones who come from Mexico are helping the U.S with the population as well as the jobs around here. 

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If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

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Two-thirds of Japanese fear going bust in retirement

Two-thirds of Japanese fear going bust in retirement | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Around two-thirds of Japanese aged 35 to 64 are concerned they will not have enough money to last through retirement, according to the results of a government survey obtained by ...

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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Mr. Soto's Human Geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 9:44 AM

This video shows how the populations of each country  are  increasing and decreasing in a very unique way. It explains how the populations are increasing and decreasing as the years go on.  It also shows that the death rates and the birth rates are  being combined to make the true populations as accurate as possible.

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 9:13 PM

This video is good at helping people better visualize population because you can easily see the difference of each continent. It shows how the population started small and rapidly expanded because of the agricultural and industrial revolution and decrease in deaths making it and the births unstablized. It even goes on to talk about the future population and how it is believed that the population won't continue to grow rapidly but once again stabalize.