Mr. Henderson's Geography
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Rich Chinese hire American surrogate mothers for up to $120,000 a child - Telegraph

Rich Chinese hire American surrogate mothers for up to $120,000 a child  - Telegraph | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Wealthy Chinese are hiring American women to serve as surrogates for their children, creating a small but growing business in $120,000 "designer" American babies for China's elite.
Charles Henderson's insight:

A very interesting take on the "One Child Policy", protecting wealth, moving to America, and skirting the law on both sides of the ocean.  Add in the 12.5% infertility rate and you have a really vivid picture of what may be happening to China's population in the future.

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Should we be worried?


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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Meteorology and geography collide in Colorado flooding

Meteorology and geography collide in Colorado flooding | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Deadly flooding in Boulder, Colo., was due to the chance collision of meteorology, geography and urban development, according to weather and climate experts.
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These Are All the Places That Europeans Actually Discovered

These Are All the Places That Europeans Actually Discovered | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Of all the places you think were discovered by Europeans, how many were actually discovered by Europeans?

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:01 PM

Really?

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, September 4, 2013 6:18 AM

Exercise 1

 

Read the new :

 

1. What was the first country in discover another place ? and the last one ?

2. What decade were the discoveries in ?

3. Why does the author of the new write "discovered" ?

4. What kind ( geographical characteristics ) of territories are the mostly of the discoveries ?

5. Give your personal opinion about text

 

Answer it on the Moodle plattform. Good Luck ¡¡

Remember put the number of exercise ¡¡

 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 5:03 PM

This mpa depicts the European discoveries that have transpired throughout the years and where they have been invented in Europe. Many of them have been created in regions near Portugal and the Spain/Austria Hungry regions. This shows you the percentage and the amount of people it has affected in each region.

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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."


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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:05 PM

this is amazing!

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These two maps are incredibly important to Obamacare

These two maps are incredibly important to Obamacare | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

If you want to understand where Obamacare stands to have the most significant impact, check out these new maps from the Census. They show uninsured levels for every county in the United States, broken down by income level. The top map shows the population that is likely to qualify for Medicaid coverage, if they live in a state that is expanding that program. The bottom map captures the Medicaid-eligible population and those who may qualify for subsidies to purchase health insurance in the new marketplaces.There are two things that these maps tell me. First, they underscore the significant impact that state policy will have on the Affordable Care Act. Texas and Florida have both decided not to participate in the Medicaid expansion, concerned about the financial implications of expanding an entitlement program. Those are states that tend to have a higher uninsured rate that will see them dip less than was initially expected under the health law.Second, these maps explain why you see a group like Enroll America focusing its work on 10 states, rather than sweeping out across the country. There are some areas of the United States, like the upper Midwest and the Northeast, that already have a relatively low uninsured rate. That likely explains why you see national groups focusing on a smaller area where they can likely have a larger impact, the places where uninsured rates for the poor hover as high as 40 percent."


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Geography in the News: Quinoa

Geography in the News: Quinoa | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Quinoa: An Old and New Nutritional Food in Western Diets In February, the United Nations declared 2013 “The International Year of Quinoa.” Quinoa is the latest trendy food...
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Official Border Statuses in Africa 2013.
Green = Open
Yellow =...

Official Border Statuses in Africa 2013.<br/>Green = Open<br/>Yellow =... | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Official Border Statuses in Africa 2013.
Green = Open
Yellow = One or more border crossing closed
Red = All border crossings closed

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 9:42 PM

Certain nations in Africa have closed border crossings with other nations, which is indicative of some sort of political conflict between them.

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Ship crashed after ‘captain forgot about English coast’

Ship crashed after ‘captain forgot about English coast’ | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
A captain ran his cargo ship aground after plotting a course that ignored the British land mass, an exposé has revealed.
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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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Chile's Diverse Geography Mixes up an Unforgettable Flavor Palette - PR Newswire (press release)

Chile's Diverse Geography Mixes up an Unforgettable Flavor Palette - PR Newswire (press release) | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Chile's Diverse Geography Mixes up an Unforgettable Flavor Palette
PR Newswire (press release)
NEW YORK, Aug.
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American dialects mapped

American dialects mapped | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Joshua Katz, at NC State University's Department of Statistics, compiled a series of simple, striking maps that visualize the words Americans use—and where they use them.
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Libya in agreement with Egypt, Chad and Sudan on sharing underground water

Libya in agreement with Egypt, Chad and Sudan on sharing underground water | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Tripoli, 20 September 2013: Libya, Egypt, Chad and Sudan have signed a UN-backed agreement  on the shared use of a massive underground aquifer system straddling the four countries known as the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System.

Via Seth Dixon
Charles Henderson's insight:

How might this change the population in this area?  Could desert cities actually spring up?  Or desert farms?

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Rainer Emily's curator insight, October 1, 2013 11:42 AM

Political

 

This article is political because the dispute of countries over water being settled would be political  :)

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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See America's Great Cities in an Interactive Map Extravaganza

See America's Great Cities in an Interactive Map Extravaganza | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
Use a spyglass to see what New York, San Francisco, Washington and other cities looked like in the 19th century
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THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY: 15 Super Thin Buildings

THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY: 15 Super Thin Buildings | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
When land is expensive or in short supply - or both, as is the case in world’s major metropolises - smart real estate developers don’t get down, they look up.
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Terrifying New Discovery About Fukushima's Radioactive Plume

Terrifying New Discovery About Fukushima's Radioactive Plume | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
By Jeremy Hsu, LiveScience Contributor: A radioactive plume of water in the Pacific Ocean from Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant, which was crippled in the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, will likely reach U.S.
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The geography of taste: how our food preferences are formed

The geography of taste: how our food preferences are formed | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
We might think we love food from far-flung lands, but most of it is tailored to suit our tastes. If you could only ever eat one cuisine again, which would you choose?
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Federal Land as a Percentage of Total State Land Area...

Federal Land as a Percentage of Total State Land Area... | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

Federal Land as a Percentage of Total State Land Area dionidium: Context: http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/291-federal-lands-in-the-us


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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...
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9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 2013 6:03 PM

You know that you should know more about the current events in Syria; so read this article to get started.


Mrs. B's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:09 PM

Summary of article goes here. A nice, juicy paragraph or so. Just read the article and tell someone what it was about conversationally. 

 

Connection goes here. How does this extremely relevant article relate to the Nature and Perspectives of Geography? This would be a great time to drop some APHUG vocab.Here are some examples: globalization, spatial distribution, 5 themes ofgeography, perception of places, patterns, distribution, scale, location(absolute and relative), environmental determinism, cultural landscape, senseof place, built environment, possibilism, place, centrality, GIS, diffusion(expansion, contagious, hierarchical, stimulus, relocation), cultural barrier,time-distance decay, mental maps, remote sensing, regions (functional, formal,perceptual), mental maps, sequent occupance, hearths, independent invention. 

This is where you get CREATIVE. 


I hope your post gets comments!

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 8, 2013 9:19 AM

Nice small and quick article the will make the reader see the basics of what is happening in Syria.  It is a great place to start and has some references of where to look if you want to do more.  This area was formed much like Africa.  Random boundaries drawn on the map by colonial powers.  And just like Africa this area has many issues.  Interesting thought??!!

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The world reacts to the crisis in Syria

The world reacts to the crisis in Syria | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:54 AM

It's amazing how sarcasm (be it Oatmeal, xkcd or the Onion) can effectively convey important geopolitic subtexts.  What merits 'international outrage?'  What doesn't?  Why not?  If you don't see this newly-discovered outrage to be hypocritical how come?  


This make be think of Weber's definition of 'the state.'  Max Weber defined the state as the "entity which upholds the claim to the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force in the enforcement of its order."  All the other countries are perfectly fine with the Syrian government killing Syrians and doing nothing about it because, among the club of states, that historically has been the perogative of the state.  Chemical weapons, however, are banned by international treaties and now the international community sees something worth stopping.  I'm not saying that this is how it should be; I'm just trying to explain what is as I see it. 

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The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart

The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart | Mr. Henderson's Geography | Scoop.it

"What could be simpler than the Middle East? A well-known Egyptian blogger who writes under the pseudonym The Big Pharaoh put together this chart laying out the region’s rivalries and alliances. He’s kindly granted me permission to post it, so that Americans might better understand the region. The joke is that it’s not a joke; this is actually pretty accurate."


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BandKids13-14's comment, August 28, 2013 9:50 AM
Did anyone else notice that both Al Qaeda and the U.S. are FOR syria rebels, and against Assad?
Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:13 AM

Interesting and (as it says) terrifying.

Todd Parsons's curator insight, September 2, 2013 10:06 AM

So we should have peace in the Middle East in maybe 7.59 billion years when the sun goes all red giant and we all burn up anyway. However, in the meantime...check out this cool chart of friends and foes. It all makes sense now, yah?