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Google Drive Blog: Some new ways to get stuff done in Google Drive

Google Drive Blog: Some new ways to get stuff done in Google Drive | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it

In case you haven’t noticed them already, here are a handful of small updates that will make it easier to find, organize, and view stuff on Drive.

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8 principles to help you advance to Flipped Learning 3.0

8 principles to help you advance to Flipped Learning 3.0 | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
These 8 guiding principles can help school leaders as they begin to implement flipped learning in their schools and districts.
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Why this IT function is a K-12 edtech savior

Why this IT function is a K-12 edtech savior | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
With budgets continuing to shrink, here's how to build school IT efficiency with automation.
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Tired Edtech Trends That Teachers Wish Would Retire: From the Floor of ISTE 2017 - EdSurge News

"On the floor of the ISTE conference, it’s easy to meet educators and administrators from all over the country (and the world at large). You can discuss edtech implementation strategies, hear about favorite tools, and get to know those practices that teachers are excited to bring back to their students."


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Come for the computers, stay for the books: Libraries are re-booting to become the tech hub for schools

Come for the computers, stay for the books: Libraries are re-booting to become the tech hub for schools | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Traci Chun, a teacher-lirarian at Skyview High School in Vancouver, Washington, and junior Ulises Santillano Tlaseca troubleshoot a 3D printing job in the library’s maker space. Photo: Kelsey Aske

Traci Chun, a teacher-librarian at Skyview High School in Vancouver, Washington, is all done with shushing. “When my library is quiet, that’s a red flag,” said Chun. In fact, the busier it is, the better—whether it’s kids experimenting with the Makey Makey circuitry or uploading designs to a 3D printer, or a class learning media literacy or a student seeking advice on a video she’s editing at one of the computer workstations.

Chun’s district is at the forefront of a national movement to turn K-12 librarians into indispensable digital mavens who can help classroom teachers craft tech-savvy lesson plans, teach kids to think critically about online research, and remake libraries into lively, high-tech hubs of collaborative learning — while still helping kids get books.

The stereotypical library can seem like a vestige, making it an easy target when budgets are tight, according to Mark Ray, Vancouver’s director of innovation and library services, “but we want libraries to be the lynchpin of education transformation.” Ray heads up Future Ready Librarians, part of Future Ready Schools — a network for sharing education technology solutions, which is sponsored by the Alliance for Excellent Education, a Washington, D.C.-based education advocacy group.

In many parts of the country, school librarians are an endangered species, with their numbers dwindling near extinction in districts such as Philadelphia and Chicago. In fact, about a decade ago, Chun’s district was on the verge of letting a slew of librarian jobs stay vacant in the wake of staff retirements. A coalition of teachers, parents and community members intervened to save the jobs, including Ray, a school librarian at the time, who convinced district leaders to repurpose librarians to make them more relevant.

That effort began by having Vancouver’s librarians get trained in new software purchased by the district, so that they could train their school colleagues in turn. Teacher-librarians such as Chun have since expanded that tech-integration role. Teaming up with Skyview’s instructional technology facilitator and early-adopting teachers, Chun frequently demonstrates new tech tools at the school’s teacher-led professional development meetings.

Often, she backs up these introductions by co-teaching a class or two. “It makes teachers more willing to try new things, because the risk is gone,” said Chun. “By letting the librarian come in and run it with your students, you can see how it works. And if it bombs, it’s not on you.”

A key theme of Future Ready Librarians, which last year published a framework to revamp the bookish role, is that districts pouring money into hardware and software need people to shepherd these tools into classrooms and to curate these burgeoning digital resources.

The Beaverton school district, west of Portland, Oregon, is a case in point. In 2012, budget shortfalls led Beaverton to axe more than 40 school librarian positions. But two years ago, embarking on a bond-funded technology push that included a computer for every student, the district had a change of heart. They created a new position called Library Instructional Technology Teacher (LITT), and have since hired more than two dozen of them.

“It became clear quite quickly that an investment in stuff, in boxes that plug in, is not really going to pay off with a lot of learning or classroom innovation unless there’s somebody to guide that process,” said Wayne Grimm, a LITT at Beaverton’s Westview High School. Grimm regularly visits classrooms to brainstorm with teachers about enhancing upcoming lessons with technology, or to co-teach a class using a new online database, learning app or digital media production tool.

“My schedule is rarely the same two days in a row,” he said. “I go wherever teachers need me.”

That could be giving social-studies students a tutorial on research skills; showing a French class how to make stop-action animation, short videos, or websites for presentations on Francophone countries; or helping a math teacher free up class time by creating sharable videos of introductory explanations and sample problems for students.

Bottom of Form

According to Audrey Church, president of the American Association of School Librarians, such duties are a natural fit for a job that long ago expanded beyond book overseer to a combination of teacher, collaborator and “information specialist” — no matter whether the source of information was the writings of Copernicus or a virtual-reality tour of the solar system. The ongoing conversion to digital resources has given most school librarians a strong background in education technology, and librarians often serve as the de facto custodian for a school’s limited stock of digital cameras, computer projectors and similar gadgets. Other paths to tech know-how include a district’s office of information technology and workshops such as those hosted by Future Ready.

And it’s not just districts looking to “save” their librarians that are adopting the new model. Baltimore County Public Schools have a long history of strong school libraries, but five years ago, they redefined the role of their 175 “library media specialists” to include teaching students a variety of analog and digital research and production skills they can use in class.

For example, Tressa Norris, a library media specialist at Joppa View Elementary School, recently worked with second-graders on multimedia presentations about American symbols to bolster a unit about patriotism being taught by their classroom teacher. First, Norris led the students to websites that gave a brief overview of what symbols are, and then she prepared students to do their own research by leading “scavenger hunts” into the district’s online databases. After everybody chose a symbol, she introduced the students to options for their presentations, such as creating a mini-blog or using digital presentation tool called Wixie that allows students to weave together text, images and their own voice.

“When they went back to their classroom, they used those tools to make their presentations and talk about being patriotic, without everybody just picking the American flag or the Statue of Liberty,” said Norris.

Over the five years of her tenure in the library, Norris has also dramatically changed its look, removing bookshelves and adding comfortable and flexible furniture so kids can move around easily and find places to work and collaborate.

They’re losing some shelves in Beaverton’s libraries, too. But the librarians insist that their commitment to books and reading is as strong as ever. Several schools in the district have added small, pleasure-reading libraries to ELA classrooms, for instance. And libraries can make a lot of room just by thinning out their old, out-of-date reference sections, according to Steven Lent, the LITT at Beaverton’s Mountain View Middle School.

“Getting kids reading is still a huge part of what we do here. But the library has to be more than a place where they come in and get their books and leave,” said Lent, who spent the last year, his first as a LITT, opening up the library, adding more power outlets and a wireless projector, and repurposing an adjoining room that had been a cramped computer lab into a maker space with Lego robotics, iPads and circuitry kits.

“The idea is to create an inviting space where kids can come in to work and explore the cool stuff we have in here,” including the books, said Lent. So far, it seems to be working. “This year, our circulation numbers are through the roof.”
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Yes, yes, yes!
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Building an Edtech Ecosystem in your Classroom

Building an Edtech Ecosystem in your Classroom | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
It has long been known that education technology is a key tool in improving student’s productivity and overall learning experience. In today’s modern society, technology is a crucial element within our educational landscape, and yet this resource has remained relatively untouched in the classroom. Finally, in recent years, it seems that the US education system is tapping into the potential of edtech by implementing 1:1 ratios for students and technology. But is this enough to create a thriving environment for students to grow? Students having access to technology is, of course, the first step in creating a thriving edtech ecosystem. …
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When School Is Nothing Like The World Students Live In

When School Is Nothing Like The World Students Live In | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it

"In an era of apps, mobility, and access, insisting that public education, as a system, formally recognize and honor—on equal terms—these “lesser” forms of learning. Forms that surrender control, value the role of play, decenter schools and programs, and really, truly teach students how to think for themselves."


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An Excellent Interactive Visual for History Teachers

An Excellent Interactive Visual  for History Teachers | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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Google Lens is Google’s future

Google Lens is Google’s future | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
This feature gives you a view into the meaning of "AI first."
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The need for factual recall is fading. 
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Six Classroom Elements Learned from Zombie Films

Six Classroom Elements Learned from Zombie Films | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Zombie films offer a framework for understanding key elements of the learning process, including the need for a hook, collaboration, risk-taking, and more.
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Android on Chromebooks! Here are some resources and apps to check out

Android on Chromebooks! Here are some resources and apps to check out | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Android has come to Chromebooks and is available on EDU Domains! This opens up a whole new world of possibilities with Chromebooks
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Finally!
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STEM Day Website Offers Masses of Classroom Activities -- THE Journal

STEM Day Website Offers Masses of Classroom Activities -- THE Journal | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
First, there was Hour of Code. Now there's Siemens STEM Day. A makeover of the traditional Siemens Science Day, the new event is intended to encourage teachers to spark student interest in new forms of science, technology, engineering and math.
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Once thought to be a fad, MOOCs showed staying power in 2016

News, voices and jobs for education professionals. Optimized for your mobile phone.
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Could nanodegrees be the future of college? Shouldn't they be?
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Top Educational Chrome Extensions of 2016

Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
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Easy-to-Use Guide: The Instruction and Technology Integration Model

Easy-to-Use Guide: The Instruction and Technology Integration Model | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
By Mary Ryerse - The K-16 Instruction and Technology Integration Model is transforming teaching and personalizing learning. Find out more here.
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Survey Says: Google for the Win | Getting Smart

Survey Says: Google for the Win | Getting Smart | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
By Tom Vander Ark - Google, Microsoft, Apple & Amazon lead the EdTech market with low-cost devices and free software, but we also need innovative platforms.
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Tips to Protect and Secure Chromebooks Off Campus

Tips to Protect and Secure Chromebooks Off Campus | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Wichita Falls Independent School District, which equips classrooms with sets of Chromebooks, kicked off a one-to-one initiative this year by allowing its ­sixth-graders to bring the devices home for the first time. But doing so has ­created a new set of security concerns.

To resolve them, Chief Technology Officer Shad McGaha installed GoGuardian, a management tool that filters web content and prevents students from visiting inappropriate sites when they’re not on campus. It also tracks the device’s location. If Chromebooks get lost or stolen, the district can take steps to recover them.

“It’s been a game changer,” McGaha says.

As school districts embrace mobile computing devices to enable digital learning, engage students and increase collaboration, many are choosing Chromebooks over traditional notebook computers or tablets because of their low cost, ease of management and integrated security, says Tom Mainelli, a program vice president with tech analysis firm IDC.

“Everyone looks at the low cost and thinks that’s the whole reason for the Chromebook’s success, but it’s really inexpensive hardware wrapped in an easy-to-manage package that makes it so successful,” Mainelli says.

Through Google’s web-based ­management tool, districts can centrally configure thousands of devices and push policies, such as the type of apps or extensions students can access based on their grade levels. Chromebooks also have built-in security features, so IT departments don’t have to worry about installing separate software to protect against viruses and malware.

While built-in features simplify management and security at school and at home, IT leaders say there are more measures districts can take to ensure the physical and digital security of Chromebooks when students take the devices off campus. That includes placing Chromebooks in protective cases, offering insurance policies, requiring students or parents to sign acceptable-use policies, using web content filters to protect children from cyberbullying and inappropriate websites, and teaching students about responsible use.



Boost Physical Security with Rugged Protection

Wichita Falls, which has about 14,000 students in 28 schools in north Texas, purchased 5,400 Dell Chromebook 11 devices over the past two years and will add another 2,000 this summer.

After launching its one-to-one initiative in sixth grade this year, the district hopes to expand the program to a new grade level each year. For now, the district provides sets of Chromebooks for classes from third grade through high school. To protect the devices, the ­district places each Chromebook in a rugged case and requires students and parents to sign an acceptable-use policy, McGaha says.

Rules governing home use include keeping the device away from pets or siblings who could damage it and keeping the Chromebook in a carrying case (different from the rugged case) when transporting it to and from school.

The policy also offers guidance on how to care for the devices, McGaha says; for example, advising students not to leave Chromebooks in cars, where extreme temperatures might cause damage, or place them on soft surfaces like sofa cushions, which could cause the devices to overheat.

Similarly, Sioux Falls School District in South Dakota places each device in a clamshell case and requires students to sign acceptable-use, ethical-use and code-of-conduct policies, says Technology Director Michael Christopherson, whose ­district has issued 19,000 Lenovo an­d Acer Chromebooks to students and teachers.

Off campus, students are required to keep the Chromebooks in their possession always, and keep their passwords secure. They also must acknowledge that they are financially responsible for any damage.

Chrome OS Provides Digital Security

Viruses, malware and phishing attacks are top concerns, but the beauty of Chromebooks and the G Suite apps are that they protect against those security threats.

Chromebooks are secure out of the box because they don’t run on traditional operating systems. The Chrome OS, which is the Chrome web browser, automatically updates with the latest security fixes. Each open tab is sandboxed or isolated, so threats are contained. If malware escapes the sandbox or if the browser is tampered with or corrupted, the Chromebook can detect it on startup and repair itself with a clean version of the browser.

Google also filters spam through Gmail and protects against malware and phishing attacks by warning students that links in their email may direct them to insecure sites, says John Weisser, executive director of technology and information services at Bloomington Public Schools in Bloomington, Minn.

Furthermore, G Suite apps encrypt data while the data is in transit or at rest. Cloud-based apps ensure that student data and privacy are protected. When students log in, they can access their apps and files. When they log out, the data is stored in the cloud and is not accessible locally, IDC’s Mainelli says. District IT leaders say the ability to use the web-based Google Admin console to customize user and device settings ­further enhances security and protects Chromebooks at home.



Students can only access approved educational apps and extensions. If IT staff need to remove an extension, for example, they blacklist it from Google Admin, and the new policy is immediately pushed to every device, says Devin Weingart, systems administrator at Sioux Falls School District.

IT leaders can also keep students safe by using web-filtering software that's compliant with the Children's Internet Protection Act, which prevents students from accessing noneducational, harmful or objectionable content and protects them from malicious websites that may contain malware or spyware.

Web filters can also help prevent cyberbullying. GoGuardian’s web filter monitors for certain keywords or categories. If the filter spots a student threatening another student online, it immediately alerts the IT staff, who then notify school administrators, McGaha says.

Bloomington Public Schools, which has equipped its third- through 12th-graders with 7,000 Dell Chrome­book 11 devices, also relies on GoGuardian for management and security filtering on at-home Chromebooks, Weisser says.

For added protection, Wichita Falls deploys iBoss to filter web content at school and relies on iBoss and GoGuardian for off-campus web filtering. “Filters are not foolproof, so with two filters, we have a better chance of blocking every inappropriate page,” McGaha says.

Teaching Responsible Internet Use

To protect students from others, such as adults who prey on children, Wichita Falls blocks most social networking sites, sets email restrictions for younger students and teaches students about responsible use.

Parents also play a role in their children’s safety by reminding them that they should not reveal personal information, McGaha says.

At home, parents can also help students learn to be responsible online by monitoring their children’s Chromebook use and checking their internet history on occasion, Weisser says. Through the Google Admin console, Bloomington prevents students from erasing their web history.

“That’s an important part of keeping students honest and supports appropriate use,” he says.
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@GoGuardian FTW!
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When School Is Nothing Like The World Students Live In

When School Is Nothing Like The World Students Live In | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it

"In an era of apps, mobility, and access, insisting that public education, as a system, formally recognize and honor—on equal terms—these “lesser” forms of learning. Forms that surrender control, value the role of play, decenter schools and programs, and really, truly teach students how to think for themselves."


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What Place Do AR And VR Have In Learning? 10 Key Points From The eLearning Network’s Event

What Place Do AR And VR Have In Learning? 10 Key Points From The eLearning Network’s Event | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Interested in learning What Place Do AR And VR Have In Learning? Check the top 10 key points from the eLearning Network's event.

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mrfrerichs's insight:
Some great points. One must always fit the tech to the lesson not the lesson to the tech.
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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, June 9, 3:38 AM
L'un des prochains défis pour une partie des activités d'enseignement
Francisco González's curator insight, June 11, 4:01 AM
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Study Finds Classroom Response 'Clickers' Can ‘Impede Conceptual Understanding’

Study Finds Classroom Response 'Clickers' Can ‘Impede Conceptual Understanding’ | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it

"Plenty of peer-reviewed research shows that classroom “clickers” improve student learning when it comes to delivering facts. But a new study found that the devices can actually work against deeper learning of big-picture concepts"


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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, May 27, 3:59 AM
More about the ideas for formative assessment
 
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Why Technology is a Creative Subject, Not a Science | Getting Smart

Why Technology is a Creative Subject, Not a Science | Getting Smart | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
By Bethany Koby - Using technology to make the world a better place should be one of the primary objectives of humanity. Here's how we can make it happen.
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10 Important Google Sheets Tips for Teachers

10 Important Google Sheets Tips for Teachers | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
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New- You Can Now Insert Google Drive Videos into Your Slides Presentations

New- You Can Now Insert Google Drive Videos into Your Slides Presentations | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
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How Virtual Reality is Changing Education

How Virtual Reality is Changing Education | Mr. Frerichs's EdTech | Scoop.it
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Is it finally here and ready to impact learning?
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