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The strange science behind design: materials from unusual sources ("textile from upcycling & recycing")

The strange science behind design: materials from unusual sources ("textile from upcycling & recycing") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
From clothing made from crab compounds to recycled blue jeans worked into your Ford Focus, innovation in textile manufacture and design is getting weirder – and more sustainable

From as far back as the story of Adam and Eve, who used fig leaves as makeshift clothing in the Garden of Eden, humans have been imagining ways to use natural materials to clothe themselves. Today's textiles are more inventive and technically advanced than ever as new synthetic-natural hybrids with cradle-to-cradle principles make their mark.

Many of the examples here use existing waste streams or manufacturing byproducts to create unique materials. Makers and manufacturers are also increasingly growing a social conscience and moving beyond environmental impact alone. The process of making sustainable textiles and textile-related products requires buy-in at multiple levels – from raw materials, manufacturing and distribution to design, branding and consumer preferences.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Textile upcycling and recycling from unusual sources ...

"But as more companies close the loop, will we see even stranger collaborations? Will there be textiles that never die in an endless circle of old polyester clothing recycled back into new polyester clothing? The future of fabrics is about to get even weirder."

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Big and small efforts worldwide to manage waste
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Waste-free living: gadgets that list themselves on eBay to lidless bottles ("more new ideas needed")

Waste-free living: gadgets that list themselves on eBay to lidless bottles ("more new ideas needed") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Our throwaway habits are wreaking havoc on the planet. Here are six ideas from designers working to reduce waste in our everyday lives

1) Use Me/Lose Me

The Use Me/Lose Me service would monitor your appliances via web-connected chips and if anything went unused for too long, ping you a text with its likely market value.

2) Bottles without lids

Instead of a cap, the bottle’s flexible, slender spout plugs into a cavity on the side, sealing the container when it’s not in use. Nepenthes, which is currently just a prototype, also unplugs at the bottom, making it easy to clean and reuse, says Valente.

3) DIY plastics recycling

His open-source Precious Plastic device is designed to give ordinary people around the world the tools to turn plastics lying around their neighbourhoods into useful and valuable items, from clipboards to bowls.

4) Tabletop composting

Its indoor, table-top ecosystem uses earthworms to turn food waste into soil, which is then used as a bed for plants, or can be removed for use in other plant pots.

5) Fruit-protecting plasma

California-based Apeel Sciences is touting an “invisible, tasteless and edible” substance made from waste farm produce such as banana peel and broccoli stalks, which it says can roughly double the life of avocados, mangos and citrus fruits by providing a protective layer against oxidation and transpiration.

6) Single-use shampoo pods

The latest version is a shampoo pod, encased in a film made from water-soluble polymer PVOH.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The search for creative solutions to reduce or minimize waste goes on and it is good to let people know about it. I am sure there are many other ideas out there that only need to be promoted.
Using social media effectively is a good way to spread good ideas.
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The race to destroy space garbage - BBC News ("the throw-away mentality is dangerous in space")

The race to destroy space garbage - BBC News ("the throw-away mentality is dangerous in space") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Millions of pieces of man-made trash are orbiting the Earth. Some are tiny, but all pose a risk.

Some 23,000 pieces of space junk are large enough to be tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network. But most objects are under 10cm (4in) in diameter and can't be monitored. Even something the size of a paper clip can cause catastrophic damage.

"And that's important because something as small as a centimetre can cause problems if it runs into a satellite." 

Collisions are rare, but half of all near-misses today are caused by debris from just two incidents. In 2007, China destroyed one of its own satellites with a ballistic missile. In 2009 an American commercial communications satellite collided with a defunct Russian weather satellite. 

As recently as 2015, the debris from that collision forced the crew of the International Space Station to evacuate to the Soyuz capsule. No-one was harmed, but the debris will likely remain in the Earth's orbit for hundreds, if not thousands of years.

Scientists are experimenting with ways to clean up space. So far, there is no space vacuum. And debris have a nasty habit of creating more debris that get exponentially smaller and harder to spot. 

More than 7,000 satellites have been put into space but only 1,500 are currently functioning. And within the next decade the number could increase to 18,000 with the planned launch of mega-constellations - large groups of satellites aimed at improving global internet coverage.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The throw-away culture of man has been exported to outer space. Didn't these space engineers foresee that outer space is not unlimited. Now they have a bigger problem of avoiding space disasters because of scattered debris.
How does this affect us? Your internet speed and TV programs may be affected.

"More than 7,000 satellites have been put into space but only 1,500 are currently functioning. And within the next decade the number could increase to 18,000 with the planned launch of mega-constellations - large groups of satellites aimed at improving global internet coverage."
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7 unrecyclable items that really can be recycled ("it only takes determination and creative thinking")

7 unrecyclable items that really can be recycled ("it only takes determination and creative thinking") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Breathe new life into hard-to-recycle junk with these innovative solutions.

But just because something’s on the no-no list, doesn’t mean it can’t be recycled — somewhere. You might have to forgo the convenience of weekly pickup, but plenty of companies and organizations are devising new ways to keep more “unrecyclables,” like the seven below, out of landfills and in circulation for use in new products.

1. Plastic grocery bags and product packaging

Solution: Fortunately, this kind of plastic is recyclable and can be transformed into many products, including composite lumber, pipes and even new bags.

2. Wine corks

There are a couple of ways to make sure your corks remain in use. One is to bring them to a Recork.org drop-off location or ship them to the organization for recycling.

3. Clothing and textiles

While it’s difficult to turn used fabric into new fabric, there are more and more ways (besides donating worn clothing to charities) to keep old outfits out of the trash heap and extend their useful life.

4. Cardboard pizza boxes

North Carolina State University has developed an eco-friendly way to deal with this problem: a pizza box composting program.

5. Yogurt containers, margarine tubs and other #5 plastic products

6. Porcelain tiles

Crossville Inc., a Tennessee tile manufacturer, has created a way to turn fired porcelain tile back into raw material for creating new tiles.

7. Wire hangers

Solution: Try returning hangers where you got them: at your local dry cleaner.

Bert Guevara's insight:
We have not yet done enough to exhaust recycling possibilities. Very few people love the environment enough to do it without putting profit as a motive.

"But just because something’s on the no-no list, doesn’t mean it can’t be recycled — somewhere. You might have to forgo the convenience of weekly pickup, but plenty of companies and organizations are devising new ways to keep more “unrecyclables,” like the seven below, out of landfills and in circulation for use in new products."
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Creative Ideas for All of Your Leftover Wine Corks

Creative Ideas for All of Your Leftover Wine Corks | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

If you're known to savor your nightly bottle of wine down to the last drop, why not take things one step further by upcycling some of the packaging? It almost seems a pity to dispose of the corks that seal your favorite liquid (what did they ever do to you?), so we've gathered a handful of practical ideas to turn something seemingly useless into booze-inspired works of art. Cheers!

1. Vases

2. A Bathmat

3. Key chains

4. Plant Markers

5. Cord Ties

6. Necklace

7. Jewelry Hooks

8. Succulent Planters

9. Cork Board

Bert Guevara's insight:
DIY up-cycling ideas for wine corks.
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Unilever's Commitment to the Circular Economy is Going Straight Ahead - Environmental Leader

Unilever's Commitment to the Circular Economy is Going Straight Ahead - Environmental Leader | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Unilever commitment to the circular economy is going straight ahead: By 2025, it says that all of its plastic packaging will be either reusable, recyclable or compostable.

“Our plastic packaging plays a critical role in making our products appealing, safe and enjoyable for our consumers. Yet it is clear that if we want to continue to reap the benefits of this versatile material, we need to do much more as an industry to help ensure it is managed responsibly and efficiently post consumer-use,” says Paul Polman, Unilever CEO. 

“To address the challenge of ocean plastic waste we need to work on systemic solutions – ones which stop plastics entering our waterways in the first place,” he adds. “We hope these commitments will encourage others in the industry to make collective progress towards ensuring that all of our plastic packaging is fully recyclable and recycled. 

Besides committing to the circular economy, it is also renewing its membership of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation for another three years and endorsing and supporting their New Plastics Economy initiative. As part of this, it will publish the full “palette” of plastics materials used in its packaging by 2020 to help create a plastics protocol for the industry, it says. 

Meantime, it wants to share proven technologies with the industry to prevent plastics from leaking into the ocean.

Bert Guevara's insight:
This company has chosen its long-term path wisely. By recognizing its environmental responsibility, it it has reconciled its profit motive, consumer edge and environmental impact. 

"Unilever commitment to the circular economy is going straight ahead: By 2025, it says that all of its plastic packaging will be either reusable, recyclable or compostable."
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Green campaigners welcome Coca-Cola U-turn on bottle and can recycling scheme ("better than banning!")

Green campaigners welcome Coca-Cola U-turn on bottle and can recycling scheme ("better than banning!") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Environmentalists hail ‘landmark moment’ as world’s biggest soft drinks company agrees to set up pilot scheme in Scotland

Coca-Cola has announced it supports testing a deposit return service for drinks cans and bottles, in a major coup for environment and anti-waste campaigners. 

Executives told an event in Edinburgh on Tuesday evening they agreed with campaigners who were pressing the Scottish government to set up a bottle-return pilot scheme to cut waste and pollution and boost recycling. 

They told the event, organised by Holyrood magazine, that the company had been examining the merits of a bottle and can deposit scheme, where consumers pay a small surcharge of about 10p per item, which is repaid when an empty can or bottle is returned to a retailer.

“The time is right to trial new interventions such as a well-designed deposit scheme for drinks containers, starting in Scotland where conversations are under way,” he said.

“The momentum is now with the campaign,” Mayhew said. “The crucial next step is for ministers to design a system that works well for the public, for local authorities, and for small Scottish businesses, including retailers as well as producers. We know it can be done, and we will continue to argue for a deposit system which takes account of their needs.”

Political parties in Wales have also floated a deposit return scheme, with a suggested deposit of 10p a bottle. The Marine Conservation Society has said up to 17% of the rubbish found on beaches is drinks containers.

Bert Guevara's insight:
This idea of bottle/can redemption is actually as old as I am!!! Maybe the new guys weren't old enough to remember it.
Moving forward, why can it not be done with other packaging? Waste recovery through incentives is actually the heart of the campaign of PARMS (Phil. Alliance for Recycling & Materials Sustainability).

“The time is right to trial new interventions such as a well-designed deposit scheme for drinks containers, starting in Scotland where conversations are under way,” he said.
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Adidas Teams with Nonprofit to Turn Plastic Pollution into Shoes ("business of upcycling sea plastic")

Adidas Teams with Nonprofit to Turn Plastic Pollution into Shoes ("business of upcycling sea plastic") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Sportswear made from the trash you see floating in the ocean may seem a strange concept, but Adidas and Parley are making beautiful plastic pollution shoes.

That’s all pretty great, but Parley has taken its advocacy a step further by taking those reclaimed materials and teaming up with Adidas to make performance fabrics for some truly awesome kicks. In 2015, the two organizations collaborated on a 3-D printed shoe constructed of upcycled marine plastic. The prototype, while amazing, was only distributed to a handful of people in social media giveaways. However, in 2016, they expanded by manufacturing 7,000 pairs of the shoe they christened the UltraBoost Uncaged Parley — and made it available for purchase.

Based on Adidas’s popular UltraBoost Uncaged design, the Parley has an “upper” composed of 95 percent ocean plastic recovered from near the Maldives. The rest of the shoe — shoelaces, heel cap, heel webbing and sock liner — is also made from recycled materials retrieved by Parley during coastal operations. The sleek design is reminiscent of ocean waves and serves as a sweet reminder of what happens when conservation meets fashion.

But Adidas and Parley aren’t stopping there. They have plans to produce at least a million pairs of the shoes using ocean plastic by the end of 2017. For Adidas, the shoe embodies a real change for the brand. Not only have they vowed to eliminate virgin plastic from their supply chain altogether, they’ve also ousted all plastic from their headquarters and ridded their retail stores of plastic shopping bags.

Additionally, the pair joined forces to create jerseys for two of the biggest football clubs in the world — Bayern Munich (Germany) and Real Madrid (Spain). The teams wore their environmentally friendly kit — made from recycled ocean plastic and water-based prints — during matches in November 2016. Like the UltraBoost Uncaged Parley, the jerseys are available for purchase.

Bert Guevara's insight:
If there is really that much plastic in the oceans, then recovering them and up-cycling these into quality products is the way to go!

"It’s incredibly heartening to see conservation practices resulting in consumer products, as it gives citizens around the world something to advocate for. Not only does it allow consumers to demonstrate their support for the oceans, it may prompt other companies to view ocean waste as a potential raw material. If we were to create a circuitous, self-sustaining supply chain, we could, without a doubt, protect and preserve the environment. Here’s to hoping that this is just the beginning of a beautiful trend, and that more companies will jump on this bandwagon and create environmentally friendly, recycled products."
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How to Finally Go Paperless in the Office ("not easy but can be done with a lot of planning")

How to Finally Go Paperless in the Office ("not easy but can be done with a lot of planning") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Going paperless saves time, money, manpower and space, but it isn't easy. This guide walks you through how to go paperless once and for all.

There are a number of reasons why businesses should go paperless. It saves time, money, manpower and space. It keeps files more secure, yet makes them easier to access when they’re needed. And the clincher? We could save entire forests. With more than 60 percent of timber harvested worldwide going into making paper — and the United States consuming more than 80 million tons of paper annually, you’d think the positive impact it would have on the planet would be enough. 

But it’s not. Many business owners complain that going paperless just isn’t feasible, and that there are too many hurdles to overcome.

Look, we know it isn’t easy. The majority of U.S.-based offices use paper in almost every aspect of their day-to-day operations. But just because it’s the way things have always been done doesn’t mean it’s the way things should always be done. It’s time for a change, and change often involves certain aches and pains. Let’s take a look at some of the barriers that keep companies from going paperless, and how to break them down.

Going paperless isn’t easy, nor will it happen overnight. Though a full transition may take months or even years to complete, the benefits you see as a result will make your hard work and planning well worth it. Think of all the trees you’ll save!

Bert Guevara's insight:
There are practical uses of paper and there are times when going paperless is better. Times are changing and we have to move on.

"Going paperless isn’t easy, nor will it happen overnight. Though a full transition may take months or even years to complete, the benefits you see as a result will make your hard work and planning well worth it. Think of all the trees you’ll save!"
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How to Finally Go Paperless in the Office
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Japan launching 'space junk' collector ("our throw away bad habit has been exported to outer space")

Japan launching 'space junk' collector ("our throw away bad habit has been exported to outer space") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Japan will launch a cargo ship Friday bound for the International Space Station, carrying a 'space junk' collector that was made with the help of a fishnet company. 

Scientists at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are experimenting with a tether to pull junk out of orbit around Earth, clearing up tonnes of space clutter including cast-off equipment from old satellites and pieces of rocket.

There are estimated to be more than 100 million pieces in orbit, posing a growing threat to future space exploration, scientists say.

Researchers are using a so-called electrodynamic tether made from thin wires of stainless steel and aluminium. 

The idea is that one end of the strip will be attached to debris which can damage working equipment -- there are hundreds of collisions every year. 

The electricity generated by the tether as it swings through the Earth's magnetic field is expected to have a slowing effect on the space junk, which should, scientists say, pull it into a lower and lower orbit. 

Eventually the detritus will enter the Earth's atmosphere, burning up harmlessly long before it has a chance to crash to the planet's surface.

A spokesman for the space agency said it hopes to put the junk collection system into more regular use by the middle of the next decade. 

"If we are successful in this trial, the next step will be another test attaching one tip of the tether to a targeted object," he added. 

The cargo ship launched Friday is also carrying other materials for the ISS including batteries and drinking water for the astronauts living there.

Bert Guevara's insight:
What can we do when outer space becomes an open dump site? When do we learn that garbage does not disappear, even in space?
Japan has volunteered to be the space junk collector.

"There are estimated to be more than 100 million pieces in orbit, posing a growing threat to future space exploration, scientists say."
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HowStuffWorks: Recycling Aluminum Convert All Video.com ("amazing aluminum recycling")

Captioned for educational purposes only
Bert Guevara's insight:
Watch this video and appreciate the benefits of going aluminum. Although it is not always cheaper, compared to other packaging, it is sustainable for the environment.
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Puerto Princesa to implement stricter waste management ("litter-free is not enough; why only now?")

Puerto Princesa to implement stricter waste management ("litter-free is not enough; why only now?") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

PUERTO PRINCESA- No segregation, no collection.

No segregation, no collection. 

This is the staunch policy that the Solid Waste Management(SWM) of Puerto Princesa will enforce starting November 15. 

The City Solid Waste Management had been warned by the National Solid Waste Management Commission to stop collecting unsorted garbage or it will impose a P500,000 penalty in accordance with Section 48 of Republic Act 9003 or the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000. 

Barangay officials were urged to make all the necessary efforts to immediately implement proper waste segregation in their respective barangays in compliance with the law. 

Some barangay officials in the city admitted that they were not able to consistently and strictly enforce this national law on waste segregation. Some of the Materials Recovery Facility or MRF that the barangay was supposed to maintain were no longer functional, too.

But barangay officials are now starting to re-educate its constituents about segregation by giving out flyers and conducting information campaign.

Bert Guevara's insight:
After 15 years, the city realizes that R.A. 9003 makes more sense that just being litter-free.

"Barangay officials were urged to make all the necessary efforts to immediately implement proper waste segregation in their respective barangays in compliance with the law. 
"Some barangay officials in the city admitted that they were not able to consistently and strictly enforce this national law on waste segregation. 
"Some of the Materials Recovery Facility or MRF that the barangay was supposed to maintain were no longer functional, too."
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5 Top Tips for Recycling Old Technology - Earth911.com ("don't just toss them into bin")

5 Top Tips for Recycling Old Technology - Earth911.com ("don't just toss them into bin") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Need to make room for some new gadgets in your life? Kick old technology to the curb with these ideas for recycling phones, computers and other tech.

Sometimes it seems that the only thing harder to get rid of than old electronics is old couches. Television sets, desktop computers, monitors, printers, tablets and even old smartphones have a tendency to hang around, even after their usefulness has run out. Most municipal garbage services advise not to throw these items in the trash, which can leave you out of luck when it comes to disposing of old technology. Thankfully, there are ways to get rid of old tech, some of which are actually quite convenient. Here are some helpful tips:

1. Replace and trade in old phones 

Many wireless providers allow you to trade in old phones when upgrading to the newest model. In fact, T-Mobile accepts iPhone 6s and other older devices, so even a previous-generation smartphone that is still perfectly good can be traded in for a new one.

2. Take advantage of corporate recycling programs 

There are also a lot of corporate recycling programs that make it easy to dispose of old electronic gadgets.

3. Sell old tech items on eBay or Craigslist 

If you would like to make money off of your old tech gadgets, it might be easier than you think.

4. Donate old tech gadgets to nonprofits 

You can trade in your old smartphone and support a good cause at the same time.

5. Don’t throw away old technology 

Tossing electronics is bad for the environment and completely unnecessary. Instead, recycle your old electronic gadgets, donate them to charity or trade them in for newer replacements. There are a multitude of ways to dispose of old tech gadgets properly, and many of these methods are so simple that there’s no reason not to use them.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Sometimes it seems that the only thing harder to get rid of than old electronics is old couches. Television sets, desktop computers, monitors, printers, tablets and even old smartphones have a tendency to hang around, even after their usefulness has run out. Most municipal garbage services advise not to throw these items in the trash, which can leave you out of luck when it comes to disposing of old technology. Thankfully, there are ways to get rid of old tech, some of which are actually quite convenient. Here are some helpful tips:
1. Replace and trade in old phones 
2. Take advantage of corporate recycling programs
3. Sell old tech items on eBay or Craigslist
4. Donate old tech gadgets to nonprofits 
5. Don’t throw away old technology
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Scan your garbage’s barcode; this smart code will tell you to recycle or trash it ("smart recycling")

Scan your garbage’s barcode; this smart code will tell you to recycle or trash it ("smart recycling") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

The smart trash can by Uzer scans your waste's UPC, and tells you which parts of the packaging can be recycled and which cannot.

You might think that deciding what can and cannot be recycled is a pretty straightforward affair, but not all plastics are recycled equally. The plastic tray in a microwave dinner can be recycled, as can the cardboard box, but what about that plastic film over the top? Can the top of a plastic bottle be recycled along with the bottle? Eugene, a smart trash can from French company Uzer, sets out to answer all these ambiguities.

The Eugene works by scanning the UPC on the packaging you’re about to toss. A small screen on the front of the can tells you what packaging can go into the recycling, and what can’t. Take the plastic bottle example: It will tell you that the bottle portion can be recycled and that the cap should be thrown away.

These days, nothing can claim to be truly “smart” unless it has a corresponding smartphone app, and Eugene doesn’t disappoint. The app works on both Android and iOS and will help you track your impact on the environment based on what you successfully recycled. It also keeps tabs on what you are disposing of, and automatically adds them to a shopping list for your next visit to the store, or even curates an online order so the replacements can be delivered to you. If you’re watching what you eat, it will even keep tabs on the nutritional information for you, so you can see what your body took in as well as your garbage can. Uzer CEO Clément Castelli also thinks that brands may want to incentivize the use of the system with discounts based on how much of their products you recycle, according to Engadget. 

The Eugene is currently in the crowdfunding stage on France’s equivalent of Kickstarter, the delightfully named KissKissBankBank. As with any crowdfunding campaign, it’s backer beware. Uzer has plans to be at CES in January to show the can off in the U.S., and the company already plans to have a second product on display come showtime. 

Bert Guevara's insight:
Recycling goes hi-tech!

"The Eugene works by scanning the UPC on the packaging you’re about to toss. A small screen on the front of the can tells you what packaging can go into the recycling, and what can’t. Take the plastic bottle example: It will tell you that the bottle portion can be recycled and that the cap should be thrown away." (Note: bottle caps in the Phil can be recycled.)
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These hotels are fighting food waste, one guest at a time ("small steps to lick a big problem")

These hotels are fighting food waste, one guest at a time ("small steps to lick a big problem") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Hilton, Hyatt, InterContinental and Marriott are participating in a 12-week pilot aimed at prioritizing prevention.

The program is part of the Rockefeller Foundation's YieldWise Initiative, which aims to reduce post-harvest food loss and halve the world's food waste by 2030. According to the group, currently around 40 percent of U.S. food waste occurs throughout the supply chain, with the hospitality and food services industry being a prime culprit. 

"With its substantial food service volume and broad reach with consumers, the hospitality industry is an ideal catalyst for accelerating change," said Pete Pearson, director of food waste at WWF. "Imagine every hotel breakfast buffet or conference luncheon eliminating food waste. While businesses should make food donation and landfill diversion a priority, these pilot projects will focus on food waste prevention, which is ultimately better for business and the environment."

"The industry has a unique opportunity to raise awareness and design the guidelines, tools and resources needed to make a difference — the participation of some of America's largest brands in these pilot programs underscores the industry's long-term sustainability commitments," she said. "Through these programs … we look forward to being a part of a worldwide solution to food waste."

"We've already seen that hotel guests are more than willing to conserve water and energy, simply by placing a card on their pillows or hanging their towels," she said. "Our hunch is that they'll also take action to be part of the fight to cut food waste. Our support of WWF — part of our $130 million, seven-year YieldWise initiative — seeks to find the simple steps they can take to be part of the solution, one breakfast buffet plate and one room service tray at a time. And once we've succeeded in cutting hospitality food waste, we can take those learnings to other sectors like restaurants and retail."

Bert Guevara's insight:
Food waste is a big problem that can be tackled one step at a time. Are you doing your part?

"We've already seen that hotel guests are more than willing to conserve water and energy, simply by placing a card on their pillows or hanging their towels," she said. "Our hunch is that they'll also take action to be part of the fight to cut food waste. Our support of WWF — part of our $130 million, seven-year YieldWise initiative — seeks to find the simple steps they can take to be part of the solution, one breakfast buffet plate and one room service tray at a time. And once we've succeeded in cutting hospitality food waste, we can take those learnings to other sectors like restaurants and retail."
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A Massive Garbage Dump Landslide in Ethiopia Kills Dozens ("the urgency to manage waste is clear")

A Massive Garbage Dump Landslide in Ethiopia Kills Dozens ("the urgency to manage waste is clear") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

A mountain of trash gave way in a massive garbage dump just outside Ethiopia's capital, killing at least 46 and leaving dozens missing

Addis Ababa city spokeswoman Dagmawit Moges said most of the 46 dead were women and children, and more bodies were expected to be found in the coming hours. 

It was not immediately clear what caused Saturday night's collapse at the Koshe Garbage Landfill, which buried several makeshift homes and concrete buildings. The landfill has been a dumping ground for the capital's garbage for more than 50 years. 

About 150 people were there when the landslide occurred, resident Assefa Teklemahimanot told The Associated Press. Addis Ababa Mayor Diriba Kuma said 37 people had been rescued and were receiving medical treatment. Dagmawit said two had serious injuries.

The resumption of garbage dumping at the site in recent months likely caused the landslide, Assefa said. The dumping had stopped in recent years, but it resumed after farmers in a nearby restive region where a new garbage landfill complex was being built blocked dumping in their area.

Around 500 waste-pickers are believed to work at the landfill every day, sorting through the debris from the capital's estimated 4 million residents. City officials say close to 300,000 tons of waste are collected each year from the capital, most of it dumped at the landfill.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Remember Payatas? That one claimed more lives, many of whom were not recovered.

"Around 500 waste-pickers are believed to work at the landfill every day, sorting through the debris from the capital's estimated 4 million residents. City officials say close to 300,000 tons of waste are collected each year from the capital, most of it dumped at the landfill."
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Only 14% of plastics are recycled – can tech innovation tackle the rest? ("taking it one at a time")

Only 14% of plastics are recycled – can tech innovation tackle the rest? ("taking it one at a time") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

A new group of companies is innovating on the problem of plastics recycling by tackling everything from styrofoam to Ziploc bags ...

Recycling the remaining 86% of used plastics could create $80bn-$120bn in revenues, says a recent report by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. But those revenues will never be fully achieved without designing new ways to breakdown and reuse 30% (by weight) of the plastic packaging that isn’t recycled because the material is contaminated or too small for easy collection, has very low economic value or contains multiple materials that cannot be easily separated. Think of candy wrappers, take-out containers, single-serving coffee capsules and foil-lined boxes for soup and soymilk.

Large companies have developed plant-based alternatives to conventional, petroleum-based plastic so that they can break down without contaminating the soil and water. The market opportunity has attracted small, young companies that focus on developing recycling technology to tackle that troublesome 30% of plastic packaging that is headed to landfills at best, and, at worst, to our rivers, lakes and oceans.


Agylix 

The target: Polystyrene. It’s commonly made into products such as styrofoam cups, packing peanuts and rigid red picnic cups.


BioCellection 

The target: Low-density polyethylene (LDPE).


Cadel Deinking 

The target: Low-density polyethylene (LDPE).


Saperatec 

The target: Mixed-material packaging.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The challenges of plastics recycling keep our creative engineers and scientists busy. From this article, it is obvious that each type of plastic has to be handled separately.
This means that SEGREGATION AT SOURCE is still a prerequisite to completing the recycling loop. R.A. 9003 at this point is still relevant.
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Nicky Ren's curator insight, March 10, 11:03 AM

The challenges of plastics recycling keep our creative engineers and scientists busy. From this article, it is obvious that each type of plastic has to be handled separately.

This means that segregation at source is still a prerequisite to completing the recycling loop. R.A. 9003 at this point is still relevant.
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Samsung and Greenpeace: what you need to know about e-waste ("how do you solve a problem like NOTE7?")

Samsung and Greenpeace: what you need to know about e-waste ("how do you solve a problem like NOTE7?") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Greenpeace claims Samsung has 4.3m smartphones to dispose of after its Galaxy Note 7 recall. What’s the responsible way to recycle them?

On Sunday, Greenpeace interrupted a Samsung press conference to protest the company’s failure to produce a recycling plan for the defective Galaxy Note 7, recalled last year due to fire risk. The campaign group claims Samsung has 4.3m handsets to get rid of.

A Samsung spokesperson has since said the company is working “to ensure a responsible disposal plan” for its defunct phones, and prioritising safety and environment. But if the piled up Galaxy Note 7s go the same way as the rest of our old smartphones, computers and tablets, where might they end up?

“Our recycling rates for electronics are abysmal,” says Jim Puckett, executive director and founder of the Basel Action Network (BAN), an NGO. He estimates that 5% of metals used in electronics are recycled, at most.

“We sweep everything to developing countries where they have the least infrastructure and efficient recycling,” says Puckett.

This kind of unregulated processing of e-waste carries severe consequences for environment and human health, including air pollution when circuit boards are heated to access the metals, soil pollution as chemicals seep into the earth, and water pollution as toxic materials get into groundwater and other supplies.

Bert Guevara's insight:
The problem that won't go away ... what do you do with 4.3M defective recalled Samsung Note 7 phones? -- SECRET!!!!

“Our recycling rates for electronics are abysmal,” says Jim Puckett, executive director and founder of the Basel Action Network (BAN), an NGO. He estimates that 5% of metals used in electronics are recycled, at most.
“We sweep everything to developing countries where they have the least infrastructure and efficient recycling,” says Puckett.
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The First 100% Recyclable Carpets Are Here ("when there's a will, there's a way to recycling")

The First 100% Recyclable Carpets Are Here ("when there's a will, there's a way to recycling") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Traditional carpets take up the second-largest amount of U.S. landfill space. Now a full reinvention of how carpets are constructed means they can be a circular economy.

But until now, no one has made a dent in the problem of household carpeting. Second only to diapers when it comes to taking up landfill space, around 3.5 billion pounds of carpet are tossed each year in the U.S. Because carpets are made up of such a complex array of chemicals, like latex and PVC, they’re next to impossible to recycle.

But Mohawk, the second-largest carpet distributor in the U.S., wanted to address this challenge for the industry. "We have a track record of innovation at Mohawk," says Tom Lape, the president of Mohawk's residential division. Mohawk partnered with the Dutch manufacturing company DSM, who along with the tech startup Niaga ("again" spelled backwards), had devised a way to manufacture fully recyclable carpets using just one material—polyester. Mohawk adapted that technology into its new line of Airo carpets, which launched in January at the International Surface Event in Las Vegas, where it won awards in product design and innovation. The carpets will hit the consumer market later this year.

Mohawk and DSM-Niaga looked at this issue, and decided that the industry was looking at carpet recycling all wrong. It wasn’t enough to apply the same process to a faulty product; the product itself would have to be reinvented. By manipulating pure polyester to form every element of the carpet, from base to tufts, the flooring, when discarded, can be returned to the manufacturer, ground up, and repurposed as yet another carpet. The "closed loop" nature of the production cycle, Petrovick says, will also stabilize prices.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Products should not be content in just rotting in landfills after use. There is still a lot of room for creativity to approach total recyclability, leading to sustainability. Here is one example.

"The new carpet construction process creates a more sustainable soft floor covering," Lape says; every Airo carpet, upon being discarded, can be recycled into a new carpet of a different style.
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British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste ("recycling level raised one notch")

British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste ("recycling level raised one notch") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

U.K. grocery chain Waitrose announced this week that it’ll be running its delivery trucks entirely on biomethane gas generated from food waste, becoming the first company in Europe to do so.

Food waste is a looming concern in the United Kingdom. At a time when 8.4 million U.K. families struggle to feed themselves daily, the volume of household food waste continues to soar, amounting to an estimated 7.3 million metric tons in 2015. 

Waitrose, according to the Times, is partnering with CNG Fuels to juice up 10 of its trucks with 100 percent renewable biomethane. The trucks can run up to 500 miles—almost twice the current average—on what is essentially rotting food. 

“We will be able to make deliveries to our stores without having to refuel away from base,” Justin Laney of the John Lewis Partnership, which operates Waitrose, said in a statement on Thursday.

Because its biomethane costs 40 percent less than diesel, any upgrades will pay for themselves in two to three years, CNG Fuels said. 

“Renewable biomethane is far cheaper and cleaner than diesel, and, with a range of up to 500 miles, it is a game-changer for road transport operators,” CNG Fuels CEO Philip Fjeld said. 

Another plus? The alternative fuel emits 70 percent less carbon dioxide, which would give a much needed boost to the European Union’s pledge to cut its greenhouse-gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030 under the Paris Climate Agreement.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Here is one food company that is making smart use of its food waste. Simply amazing foresight!

"The supermarket just announced that it’ll be running its delivery trucks entirely on biomethane gas generated from food waste, becoming the first company in Europe to do so.
"Waitrose, according to the Times, is partnering with CNG Fuels to juice up 10 of its trucks with 100 percent renewable biomethane. The trucks can run up to 500 miles—almost twice the current average—on what is essentially rotting food.
"Because its biomethane costs 40 percent less than diesel, any upgrades will pay for themselves in two to three years, CNG Fuels said."
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Pagtatambak ng basura sa Payatas, ipatitigil sa loob ng 3 taon ("panahon na para gawin ang nararapat")

Pagtatambak ng basura sa Payatas, ipatitigil sa loob ng 3 taon ("panahon na para gawin ang nararapat") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Nagbabala ang DENR sa mga local government units na maghanap na ng mga alternatibong tatapunan ng basura.

Nagbabala ang DENR sa mga local government units na maghanap na ng mga alternatibong tatapunan ng basura. Ito'y dahil ipagbabawal na nila ang pagtambak ng basura malapit sa mga may tubig na lugar gaya ng Payatas dumpsite sa Quezon City. Bandila, January 18, 2017, Miyerkules

Bert Guevara's insight:
Hindi na pwede ang puro HAKOT/TAMBAK; lalo na kung watershed ang pook ng tambakan. Eh, buong Metro Manila yata watershed. Paano na?
May solusyon naman kung makikinig, pero hindi pwede INSTANT SOLUTION. Huwag hintayin maubos ang 3 taon palugit. Ngayon na!

"Nagbabala ang DENR sa mga local government units na maghanap na ng mga alternatibong tatapunan ng basura. Ito'y dahil ipagbabawal na nila ang pagtambak ng basura malapit sa mga may tubig na lugar gaya ng Payatas dumpsite sa Quezon City. Bandila, January 18, 2017, Miyerkules."
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Why Is Denver So Bad at Recycling? - Earth911.com ("poor policies become disincentives to recycling")

Why Is Denver So Bad at Recycling? - Earth911.com ("poor policies become disincentives to recycling") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Denver is one of those cities that seems like it would be a dream for any eco-friendly person to live in. It’s full of like-minded people all working together to keep the environment clean and healthy … right? According to a recent study, that might not be the case. Denver recycles only 18 percent of the waste that is generated

So why are the recycling rates in Denver so low? The majority of the blame should go to the city’s current policies, according to the authors of the study. In an annual city survey, the vast majority of people surveyed rated recycling as a high priority and said that “recycling is very important or essential.” 

The current challenges include: 

- Denver residents who live in larger housing complexes don’t have access to recycling bins. 

- There is an additional charge of about $10 per month to have the green composting bins picked up. These are the bins that hold organic waste like leaves, food scraps and grass clippings. Currently, only 4 percent of single-family home residents have city compost bins. 

- Trash collection is provided to all single-family homes in Denver, but the recycling service is voluntary and only available upon request. As a result, many Denver residents haven’t taken the initiative to set up service, and, as a result, 23 percent of homes don’t have recycling bins. 

- Many Denver businesses don’t have a recycling program. In fact, according to CoPIRG, businesses produce as much as 60 percent of municipal waste.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Learn from the experience of others. Find out why this city is only recycling at an 18% rate. Policies turn out to be disincentives!
URBAN RECYCLING IS ALL ABOUT INCENTIVES!

"How to Improve Recycling Rates 
"What can Denver (and any other city in its situation) do to improve recycling rates? Here’s what the study’s authors say: 
1. Make sure everyone has the opportunity to recycle.  
2. Make it more attractive to compost. 
3. Support businesses that recycle. 
4. Set a zero-waste goal. 
5. Provide financial incentives to recycle."
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New app proves a nourishing idea for wasted food | Killian Fox ("if there's a will, there's a practical way")

New app proves a nourishing idea for wasted food | Killian Fox ("if there's a will, there's a practical way") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

The distribution of surplus food in Ireland is being transformed by FoodCloud. Killian Fox meets the duo behind the venture

Ward, who is 26, was studying business and economics at Trinity College, Dublin, where O’Brien, 31, was completing a masters in environmental science. Neither were particularly tech-savvy – they bonded over “a love for food and a distaste for waste” – but that didn’t deter them from using technology to address the problem. “We developed an app that would help businesses notify charities when they had surplus food available,” says Ward. 

It took them a year and a half to build. To use FoodCloud, the retailer simply uploads details of what’s available to the app. Local charities receive that information automatically, collect the surplus food at an appointed time and distribute it to those in need. The idea appealed to Tesco Ireland, which offered FoodCloud a trial just as Ward was finishing her degree. Tesco later introduced the service to all of its 140 stores around Ireland.

But why did this disconnect between retailers and charities exist? An estimated 1.9m tons of food is wasted in the UK grocery supply chain every year, according to the Waste and Resources Action Programme (Wrap). Meanwhile food poverty is on the rise – figures from the Trussell Trust show that food-bank use has increased more than 40-fold in the UK since 2008-09. It seems indefensible that supermarkets are throwing away good produce.

Bert Guevara's insight:
Giving is a source of happiness to both donor and recipient. Find out how a simple idea has become a big deal in food waste management.

But this isn’t all about networks and supply chains, nor can you judge FoodCloud purely on the number of meals they’ve helped donate – 8.4m in the UK and Ireland since they launched. It’s also about the tangible difference that the start-up is making in people’s everyday lives. Ward tells me they are working with a women’s refuge in Ireland where many of the residents find it difficult to socialise. “Now the managers are noticing that when the food donation arrives twice a week, the women are coming out of their rooms, swapping food and sharing recipes, and there’s laughter in the room. The recognition that food is about far more than nutrition, that it also has the potential to connect and empower people. For us that’s one of the most powerful pieces of feedback we can get.”
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This Dutch Company Turns Demolished Buildings Into Beautiful Materials ("you have to see this")

This Dutch Company Turns Demolished Buildings Into Beautiful Materials ("you have to see this") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Razing old structures creates huge amounts of waste. StoneCycling transforms it into usable material.

One of the newest buildings on Gouvernestraat, a road in Rotterdam, is actually one of the oldest—but you wouldn't be able to tell from looking at it. By all accounts, the petite house looks thoroughly modern, thanks to its Spartan facade and lack of architectural flourishes. But it's actually composed of architectural waste salvaged from demolished structures, 15 tons of it to be exact.

With this new, consumer-focused product line and its existing trade-oriented building materials business, Massa and van Soest are aiming to create a competitive market around materials destined for landfill—and incentivizing more sustainable design in the process. Here's how.

Van Soest graduated from Design Academy Eindhoven at the peak of the economic crisis in Europe. He noticed that a lot of buildings were vacant or under demolition, and found himself wondering what happens to these structures after the wrecking ball hits. Where does all of that rubble go? He started doing more research and found that in the Netherlands, the construction industry generates 65% of the country's waste—the largest proportion of the entire stream. He began tracking where that waste went, and soon learned that some of it was crushed and turned into material for paving roads or shipped overseas for disposal. 

"The alternative [for handling construction waste], compared to our solution, is down cycling," Massa says. "The value goes down per ton. What we try to do is create products that represent more value than the current combined price of those waste streams."

Bert Guevara's insight:
In the Netherlands, the construction industry generates 65% of the country's waste. 
How about the Philippines? Is there any institutional effort to reuse, upcycle and recycle construction waste?

"Van Soest began to think about how he could apply circular-economy thinking—in which resources are reused as efficiently as possible—to the construction waste problem. 
"Why not turn demolished buildings into new buildings?"
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Landfills have a huge greenhouse gas problem. Here's what we can do about it. ("divert food waste")

Landfills have a huge greenhouse gas problem. Here's what we can do about it. ("divert food waste") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Food and yard waste make trash heaps prolific producers of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. What can we do to solve this problem?

We take out our trash and feel lighter and cleaner. But at the landfill, the food and yard waste that trash contains is decomposing and releasing methane, a greenhouse gas that’s 28 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Landfill gas also contributes to smog, worsening health problems like asthma. 

Globally, trash released nearly 800 million metric tons (882 million tons) of CO2 equivalent in 2010 — about 11 percent of all methane generated by humans. The United States had the highest total quantity of methane emissions from landfills in 2010: almost 130 million metric tons (143 million tons) of CO2 equivalent. China was a distant second, with 47 million (52 million), then Mexico, Russia, Turkey, Indonesia, Canada, the United Kingdom, Brazil and India, according to the Global Methane Initiative, an international partnership of government and private groups working to reduce methane emissions. 

Because methane typically has a much shorter life in the atmosphere than CO2 (12 years compared with 100 to 300 years for carbon dioxide), reducing methane release from landfills can help rapidly reduce climate change risk.

A more direct — and likely more successful — way to reduce landfill methane would be to reduce the amount of methane-generating materials going into landfills in the first place. 

With some 40 percent of all food wasted in the United States, reducing food waste offers big opportunities. Last year the EPA and U.S. Department of Agriculture set a target to reduce food waste by 50 percent by 2030, with programs for public education and commercial policies. “Let’s feed people, not landfills,” said EPA administrator Gina McCarthy in announcing the initiative. “By reducing wasted food in landfills, we cut harmful methane emissions that fuel climate change, conserve our natural resources, and protect our planet for future generations.”

Bert Guevara's insight:
Diverting food waste from landfills is a simple but proven procedure to reduce methane generation. Why don't we just enforce R.A. 9003 in the Philippines and do our part in climate change mitigation? 

"With some 40 percent of all food wasted in the United States, reducing food waste offers big opportunities. Last year the EPA and U.S. Department of Agriculture set a target to reduce food waste by 50 percent by 2030, with programs for public education and commercial policies. “Let’s feed people, not landfills,” said EPA administrator Gina McCarthy in announcing the initiative. “By reducing wasted food in landfills, we cut harmful methane emissions that fuel climate change, conserve our natural resources, and protect our planet for future generations.”
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The cost of plastic packaging ("weighing in on its necessity in the battle vs food waste")

The cost of plastic packaging ("weighing in on its necessity in the battle vs food waste") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
The changes have happened so gradually that most consumers haven’t even noticed, but a tremendous amount of plastics have crept onto supermarket shelves. Shoppers are tossing a lot of plastic packages into their carts that didn’t exist when they were kids. Cucumbers sleeved in polyethylene film are now ubiquitous in the produce department, as are sliced fruits in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers and chopped, ready-to-eat salads in polypropylene bags. People don’t have to make their own guacamole or hummus anymore—it comes already prepared in convenient polypropylene tubs.
Resealable plastic pouches, made from sophisticated multilayered films, are all over the supermarket. Shoppers can spot them on dry goods shelves containing granola, brown sugar, and beef jerky. They hang in refrigerator cases displaying shredded cheeses and cold cuts and are stacked in freezers filled with chicken, fish sticks, and french fries. Even tuna is starting to come in easy-to-open metallized pouches instead of the familiar stout can. Vacuum-packed steak, ribs, and chicken are a growing presence in meat department cases.
Many industry critics think all these plastics are a bit much. “It’s so immensely curious how stupid modern packaging is,” William McDonough, a designer and sustainability guru, told a greenbiz.com reporter a few years back. 
To McDonough and like-minded critics, flexible plastics, especially the newer multilayered films, are another excess of a throwaway society. They are much harder to recycle than the simpler metal, paper, and glass containers they replace. Too many of the new materials end up in landfills or bobbing around the ocean. And they make it all too easy for people to simply discard things without a thought to the damage they are doing to the planet.
Bert Guevara's insight:
There is a saying, "You cannot put a good man down."
When applied to plastic, its beneficial uses continue to promote its existence in the market, in spite of all the negative advocacy.

"The packaging industry, though, doesn’t think its products are so stupid. It sees plastics as a solution to another big environmental problem: food waste. Flexible plastics don’t shatter or dent, and if they are well-engineered, they don’t rip or puncture either. Their multilayered structures ensure long-term preservation of the food inside. And they are lighter and cheaper to transport than metals or glass."
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