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BICYCLED » A bike made out of cars

BICYCLED » A bike made out of cars | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Cars go to the junkyard and we recycle them to create the most efficient, ecological and healthy mean of transportation. BICYCLED. (LOVE this idea: "BICYCLED » A #bike made out of #cars" Take a look.

Every product we create is based on a consumer insight, that's also based on an emotion. In this case, the emotion bikers feel when they ride a bike that was made out of wasted cars.

Bicycled is not only a new type of bike, it is also a return to the roots of biking. It's a handmade bike created specially by bicycle shop owners. Those fantastic creatures that are about to become extinct.

Because every Bicycled is made out of real car parts, there won't be two of a kind. That's the key to a product designed to use as much car waste as it can.

 


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Ombudsman probes local gov’t execs over illegal dump sites ("failure in implementing the SWM act")

Ombudsman probes local gov’t execs over illegal dump sites ("failure in implementing the SWM act") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
The Office of the Ombudsman on Wednesday officially started its probe of around 600 local government officials throughout the country over illegal dump sites and other violations of the Ecological

The Office of the Ombudsman on Wednesday officially started its probe of around 600 local government officials throughout the country over illegal dump sites and other violations of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000.

During the ceremonial filing of affidavit-complaints of the National Solid Waste Management Commission at the Ombudsman central office, the complainants led by commissioner Romeo Hidalgo of the Ecowaste Coalition said the officials violated Republic Act No. 9003.

A total of 50 complaints were filed, covering local officials in 50 local government units over 13 administrative regions.

The complainants said mayors, vice mayors, and local legislative officials “conspired in committing the violations of R.A. No. 9003,” noting that they have “the mandate to establish policies and having control over the funds of the city.”

The filing was part of the Environmental Ombudsman’s program launched in 2013, in coordination with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources’ Environmental Management Bureau. The Ombudsman launched a three-year campaign “to increase awareness of, and promote voluntary compliance with R.A. No. 9003,” directing LGUs to conduct “respective self-assessment as to their compliance status and to voluntarily implement corrective actions.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

The finger-pointing begins!


"A total of 50 complaints were filed, covering local officials in 50 local government units over 13 administrative regions.

"The complainants said mayors, vice mayors, and local legislative officials “conspired in committing the violations of R.A. No. 9003,” noting that they have “the mandate to establish policies and having control over the funds of the city.”

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E-waste - A priority emerging policy issue (a chemical-free world by 2020?")

Hazardous Substances in the Life Cycle of Electronics and Electrical Products (HSLEEP)/E-waste - one of five priority emerging policy issues in the sound man...
Bert Guevara's insight:

E-waste 101.

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Don't toss that overripe avocado! 7 ways to salvage it ("check other uses before throwing away")

Don't toss that overripe avocado! 7 ways to salvage it ("check other uses before throwing away") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
An avocado's ripeness comes during a limited window of time. If you miss the window, these 7 recipes will come in handy.

A serving of an avocado is packed with nutrients like potassium, vitamin K, folate, B vitamins and vitamin C. The fat in an avocado is mostly the healthy, monounsaturated kind that is good for cholesterol. Avocados are great turned intoguacamole, tossed into a salad, or turned into fries.

You may have a few extra avocados hanging around this week, perhaps some you picked up for a Cinco de Mayo celebration. The frustrating thing about this versatile fruit is that it isn’t always ripe when you need to use it. If it hasn’t ripened, the flesh is hard and unappealing. If it’s too ripe, the flesh can be mushy or brown. Hitting that optimum ripeness — when the flesh is firm, but with some give to it — is a common problem.

There are tricks to ripening an avocado, like sticking it in a paper bag with an apple or banana. If an avocado has gotten too ripe, it may not be good for slicing on top of salads or chopping up into salsa — foods that call for ripe but firm avocados. It’s not useless though. There are lots of uses for overripe avocados, as long as they aren’t too brown. (A little bit of brown can simply be cut out.)

Bert Guevara's insight:
This is kitchen recycling!

1. Chocolate Avocado Pudding: As long as the avocados haven’t gone brown yet, mushy avocados are fine for this recipe because they go in the blender.

2. Avocado Cucumber Soup: The avocados in this recipe in this are also put in a blender. This soup requires no cooking; it’s served chilled.

3. Spinach Smoothie with Apple and Avocado: Healthy and creamy, an overripe avocado adds to the creaminess of a smoothie.

4. Chocolate Caramel Avocado Brownies: Hide some healthy stuff in your brownies. The overripe fruit will help these keep their fudgy consistency.

5. Avocado and Coconut Popsicle: With coconut milk and fresh tarragon, these are unusual but tasty treats.

6. Corn and Avocado Fritters: Not a usual fritter filler, but if avocados can pop up in pudding and popsicles, why not fritters?

7. Cucumber and Avocado Face Mask: This gets blended to a paste-like consistency, so very soft avocados are perfect.

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PIPE pavilion is made from over one thousand recycled cardboard tubes ("upcycling anyone?")

PIPE pavilion is made from over one thousand recycled cardboard tubes ("upcycling anyone?") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Khayam University architecture students upcycled 1,014 cardboard tubes into an undulating pavilion.

Farnaz Fattahi led a group of 28 Khayam University architecture students in the construction of the PIPE pavilion, an undulating sculpture made from 1,014 recycled cardboard tubes. As an exercise in upcycling, the project promotes the idea of minimizing waste and pollutants through creative reuse. The temporary pavilion measures 2.9 meters in height with a width of 6 meters.

The undulating shape symbolizes the “detachment of industry from nature” and corresponds to the perceived decrease in value of the cardboard tube after it’s served its industrial purpose. The pavilionrediscovers the pipe’s potential by creating a sheltering space. “The holistic design creates an architectonic space within the created semi enclosed arc promoting a spatial quality allowing the users to pause and realize the view of the embraced landscape,” writes Fattahi.

Bert Guevara's insight:

An example of upcycling cardboard tubes.

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Tesco plastic bag use 'down 80%' since 5p charge ("charging changes behavior, leads to reduction")

Tesco plastic bag use 'down 80%' since 5p charge ("charging changes behavior, leads to reduction") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
The number of plastic carrier bags taken home by Tesco shoppers in England has dropped by 80% since the 5p charge was introduced, data suggests.

The government brought in the charge on 5 October to help reduce the amount of plastic waste.

Tesco declined to say how many 5p bags had been bought but said it was down 78% on the month before the charge, the Daily Telegraph reports.

The chain is to give the proceeds from plastic bag sales to charity.

The number of carriers bags given out by seven major supermarkets in England rose by 200 million in 2014 to exceed 7.6 billion - the equivalent of 140 per person and amounting to 61,000 tonnes in total.

Tesco's market share suggests it is likely to have handed out in excess of two billion single-use bags in 2014.

The supermarket said it had also seen a 50% increase in the amount of shoppers opting for "bagless" online deliveries.

Rebecca Shelley, Tesco's communications director, said the charge had "clearly had a huge impact" and the company was on target to donate £30m to charity over the year.

"In clothing, since the legislation was introduced, we have seen a reduction of around 50% on clothing bags usage," she added.

England was the last part of the UK to adopt the 5p levy following successful schemes in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The British Retail Consortium said the number of carrier bags now used by UK shoppers indicated there had been a significant reduction.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The policies should address behavior and not the package. This experience in Europe proves my point.


"Nevertheless, we must not let an obsessions with carrier bags get in the way of the wider and more important green goals on which retailers are working incredibly hard and making significant progress including reducing packaging, carbon emissions, food waste and waste to landfill," a spokesman said.

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UN News - Biodegradable plastics are not the answer to reducing marine litter, says UN

UN News - Biodegradable plastics are not the answer to reducing marine litter, says UN | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Widespread adoption of products labelled “biodegradable” will not significantly decrease the volume of plastic entering the ocean or the physical and chemical risks that plastics pose to marine environment, accord to a United Nations report released today.
Bert Guevara's insight:

In my last public hearing on "Life Cycle Analysis", I came out with this same prescription (as the UN) that we get rid of biodegradable plastics and go to full recovery and recycling of "real" plastics. One-use disposable plastics and the litter-bugs are the real enemy.

The solid waste problem is a behavioral problem.


"... complete biodegradation of plastics occurs in conditions that are rarely, if ever, met in marine environments, with some polymers requiring industrial composters and prolonged temperatures of above 50°C to disintegrate. There is also limited evidence suggesting that labelling products as “biodegradable” increases the public's inclination to litter."

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Sheds that will inspire you to use recycled, reclaimed and eco-friendly materials - Eco Friend

Sheds that will inspire you to use recycled, reclaimed and eco-friendly materials - Eco Friend | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Constructing a shed, greenhouse or a cool store in your backyard is fun, as you can choose from a wide assortment of interesting shapes or make one using your creativity. To make it even more interesting, try using unique materials. Using recycled and reclaimed materials will enable you to construct eco-friendly structures in your backyard. If you are somewhat convinced, you can derive inspiration from these following structures people have made using eco-friendly materials.

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

Here are some ideas on how to build sheds from recycled materials. These are good ideas in building MRFs (Materials Recovery Facilities).

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New research shows just how much better recycled paper is for forests ("only 1% of GHG emissions")

New research shows just how much better recycled paper is for forests ("only 1% of GHG emissions") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
The results of a new study pitting recycled paper against paper made from virgin fibers aren't all that surprising, but notable all the same.

A new life cycle analysis shows the substantial environmental benefits of 100 percent recycled paper over paper made from virgin wood fiber.

The study, conducted by SCS Global Services on behalf of New Leaf Paper, a company that specializes in “tree free” paper, is the first to use a new standard for evaluating the environmental impacts of a product’s complete life cycle. The results are perhaps not that surprising, but notable all the same.

SCS Global Services compared the environmental and human health impacts of 2,500 tons of New Leaf’s Reincarnation paper — 100 percent post-consumer coated paper — with the impacts from 2,500 tons of comparable virgin coated papers produced by three North American mills.

The analysis revealed that the recycled paper had less than one percent of the greenhouse gas emissions responsible for climate change and ocean acidification as the virgin paper, while using one-fourth of the water.

The use of recycled fibers, of course, also meant no logging occurred for New Leaf’s paper. The three virgin paper mills, on the other hand, required the harvesting of between nine and 18 million cubic feet of wood.

Recycled paper avoids the associated impacts that logging brings with it, too. For instance, the harvesting of the wood fed into just one of the virgin paper mills disturbed the habitat for 115 different endangered species. New Leaf’s recycled paper had no impact on rivers and wetlands, either, whereas the three virgin papers each impacted more than 600 watersheds.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Are you using recycled paper? Here's why you should, for the sake of the planet.


"The analysis revealed that the recycled paper had less than one percent of the greenhouse gas emissions responsible for climate change and ocean acidification as the virgin paper, while using one-fourth of the water."

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MIT scientist develops method for turning pollution into printer ink : TreeHugger ("new bright idea?")

MIT scientist develops method for turning pollution into printer ink : TreeHugger ("new bright idea?") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
If we can turn smog into jewelry, why not printer ink?

Printing ink, especially the basic black ink found in printers and copy machines just about everywhere, is a cash cow for some companies, but one scientist believes we can make it easily enough with the soot present in the air of polluted cities. Anirudh Sharma, a graduate of the MIT Media Lab, says that companies such as HP and Canon make some 70% of their profits by selling printer ink cartridges made using "complex chemical procedures" at a 400% margin, but his invention, if perfected and scaled up, might take that model and turn it on its head.

"Usually, people don't know about this, but the ink you're buying is nothing. It's just carbon black mixed with a few chemicals, and that's all. If you're making your own ink, the cost would definitely be much, much lower." - Sharma

According to Sharma's website, his Kaala-printer contraption (kaala means black) was conceived of during a trip to his home country of India, where heavy smog and soot are an everyday occurrence in the crowded cities, which led him to wonder if the soot in the air could be repurposed into ink for printers.

Sharma built a demo device that can pull soot from a burning candle and accumulate it in a modified syringe, which is then used to fill a modified HP inkjet cartridge with a mixture of the soot, vodka, and olive oil. When the cartridge is integrated with anArduino ink shield, this decidedly low-tech ink can be used to print at a 96 dpi resolution.

Bert Guevara's insight:
If we can turn smog into jewelry, why not printer ink?

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What Does a National Call For Food Waste Reduction Mean? ("a timely movement for lifestyle change")

What Does a National Call For Food Waste Reduction Mean? ("a timely movement for lifestyle change") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
On September 16, 2015, the USDA and EPA announced the first-ever national food waste reduction goal, with hopes of reducing food waste 50% by 2030.

A publicly stated goal means that governmental leaders are recognizing food waste as a real problem. Even though the statistics are alarming - one third of food in the United States currently goes to waste, amounting to $165 billion in lost value - efforts to minimize food waste are a full generation behind initiatives regarding more traditional recyclable products (e.g. paper and plastics).

All of that may be changing though. Food & Wine magazine is calling food waste “probably the most discussed food-related topic of the year,” and the issue is also catching the attention of political commentators, such as John Oliver. What’s significant about this media attention is the role it plays in influencing the prioritization of food waste reduction initiatives from citizens and national leaders.

Ultimately, public awareness is key in successfully reaching the goal, and better education among food companies, nonprofits and consumers about legislation is essential. Although it’s a common misconception that food companies can be sued for donating surplus food, the Good Samaritan Food Donation Act actually protects businesses from lawsuits when making food donations. Understanding this is imperative, especially now that the Commercial Food Waste Disposal Ban went into effect in Massachusetts in October 2014, which prevents businesses from throwing away more than one ton of food per week. With American food waste policy just beginning to take shape, the U.S. is following guidance from U.N. Food Programme goals and France’s recent decision to make edible food waste illegal for businesses.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Developing countries like the Philippines stand to benefit much from a program like this. Poverty alleviation can be one of its beneficiaries.


"A publicly stated goal means that governmental leaders are recognizing food waste as a real problem. Even though the statistics are alarming - one third of food in the United States currently goes to waste, amounting to $165 billion in lost value - efforts to minimize food waste are a full generation behind initiatives regarding more traditional recyclable products (e.g. paper and plastics)."

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What can we do about food waste? Fresh facts for restaurant, catering and hospitality staff www - YouTube

http://www.cateringmadridbarato.es Food waste is a valuable resource, this video from Zero Waste SA will motivate those working in the restaurant, catering a...

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

Food waste management makes a lot of sense and practicality.

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City Hall orders closure of QC's ‘unsanitary’ Balintawak Market ("bad waste mgmt cost their income")

City Hall orders closure of QC's ‘unsanitary’ Balintawak Market ("bad waste mgmt cost their income") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
The Balintawak public market is going to be shut down after the Quezon City government found it too unsanitary to continue operating.
The Balintawak Market suffers from a waste management problem: All trash goes directly into the Toctocan Creek and  slaughterhouses in the market were found to be filthy. "Kawawa naman bumibili diyan," the mayor said. Balintawak public market's cleanliness problem has been discussed since 2009 and the Quezon City government waited on the market's management to comply with sanitary protocols for six years. "We've always been advising them, 'O naasan na ang compliance n'yo?' Para nga kaming mga sirang plaka," City Market Administration and Development Department officer-in-charge Malou Arrieta explained. "Kumbaga, iyong toleration namin for their compliance eh nandito na sa maximum kasi masyado nang malaki ang impact," she added. Shutting down the market may address cleanliness issues in the area, but it will leave the vendors jobless. "Mawawalan po kami ng hanapbuhay. Siyempre kawawa rin kami na mahirap," vendor Andang said. And when they lose their source of income, their families will suffer. "Marami po talaga ang magugutom. Sigurado ho iyon. Dito lang po kami kumukuha ng kabuhayan," vendor Vicky Santos said. 

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

This is a bad precedent. Without anyone providing a solution to the waste management problem - neither government, business, civil society, church - the quickest way out was to ban the market. This is as simplistic as banning plastic bags and styro.

I wish our leaders stop pointing fingers and pinning the blame on everyone else, except themselves.

It shouldn't have come to this!

 

"We've always been advising them, 'O naasan na ang compliance n'yo?' Para nga kaming mga sirang plaka," City Market Administration and Development Department officer-in-charge Malou Arrieta explained. "Kumbaga, iyong toleration namin for their compliance eh nandito na sa maximum kasi masyado nang malaki ang impact," she added. (No mention of any government initiative; just warnings.)
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Denmark Might Be Winning The Global Race To Prevent Food Waste ("they must be doing something right?")

Denmark Might Be Winning The Global Race To Prevent Food Waste ("they must be doing something right?") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
According to a recent report from the Danish government, Danes now throw away 25 percent less food than they did five years ago. Supermarkets are doing their part by selling older food at a discount.

Danes' increasing willingness to buy and consume items like just-expired dairy products has helped make them, arguably, the world champions in the fight against food waste. According to a recent report from the Danish government, Danes now throw away 25 percent less food than they did five years ago.

In 2008, after years of dismay at the amount of food she saw landing in Danish trash cans, Juul started the organization Stop Wasting Food.

Farmers and retailers often get the brunt of the criticism when it comes to food waste, but Juul decided to start at the other end.

"I thought, 'Who can we move? Well, we can move the people.' So we started focusing on the people," she says.

Juul created a Facebook group and two weeks later started appearing in the national media, where she has been a regular figure ever since.

It was an efficient strategy, given that individual consumers are responsible for 36 percent of food waste in this country, compared to retailers (23 percent), the food processors (19 percent) and primary producers (14 percent), according to figures from the Ministry of the Environment and Food.

But Juul says her seven-year effort to poke and prod consumers is starting to trickle up the food chain.

"Now, because it's become a trend of not wasting food, the companies and the food producers and retailers are starting to act as well," she says. "Compared to other countries, Denmark, at the moment, has the most supermarkets doing something to reduce food waste."

 

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

Battling food waste is a whole lot of common sense and creative planning. It's time we get away from the straight-jacket of expiration and disposal. There are many ways of licking the problem.

 

"It's just good business," she says. "Any grocer would rather sell something than throw it away."
"She says Dansk Supermarked's chains have sold food near expiration at reduced prices for decades. But while buying these items might once have been considered a sign of poverty for consumers, it's now a badge of pride. And the company has responded by piling reduced price goods in dedicated areas, marked with special signage."

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Bert Guevara's curator insight, September 2, 2015 8:58 PM

Battling food waste is a whole lot of common sense and creative planning. It's time we get away from the straight-jacket of expiration and disposal. There are many ways of licking the problem. 

 

"It's just good business," she says. "Any grocer would rather sell something than throw it away."

"She says Dansk Supermarked's chains have sold food near expiration at reduced prices for decades. But while buying these items might once have been considered a sign of poverty for consumers, it's now a badge of pride. And the company has responded by piling reduced price goods in dedicated areas, marked with special signage."

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One Man's Trash: New Technologies, Partnerships Boosting Recycling Around the World | Sustainable Brands

One Man's Trash: New Technologies, Partnerships Boosting Recycling Around the World | Sustainable Brands | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Among the key challenges to the burgeoning recycling market are lack of infrastructure, innovation at scale and funding. But a variety of initiatives — in developed and developing areas alike — are attempting to secure these factors to help spur the development of circular economic infrastructure.

In Argentina, a new generation of trash pickers is helping to refine recycling at the street level. Buenos Aires has invested in recycling through the city government’s Ciudad Verde (Green City) plan and now more than 5,000 litter pickers (known locally as cartoneros) collect a base salary for emptying the city’s bell-shaped recycling bins.

“The first big change came in 2002 when Buenos Aires withdrew a long-standing law that made litter picking illegal,” Santiago Sorroche, anthropologist at the University of Buenos Aires, recently told The Guardian. “The second came with the Zero Garbage law [in 2005], which aims to gradually reduce the solid waste going to landfill.”

Sergio Sánchez, president of the Argentine Federation of Litter Pickers and Recyclers, struck a deal with city officials so registered litter pickers receive a monthly salary of $383 to empty recycling bins, in addition to a minimal social security package and a small pension.

“The big difference today is that we’re treated as workers providing a public service for the city,” Sánchez told The Guardian. “Before, people would look down on us and say we created a mess, plus the police would always hassle us.”

In Brazil, New Hope Ecotech is a technology solution company that offers a digital platform to connect manufacturers with waste pickers via trade-able environmental securities (similar to carbon credits, but for recyclables). Refining a process from street collection to reinvestment is innovation at scale.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The key word is to zero waste is "CIRCULAR ECONOMY;" and it does not require rocket science! Check out this Argentinian model.


"Among the key challenges to the burgeoning recycling market are lack of infrastructure, innovation at scale and funding. But a variety of initiatives — in developed and developing areas alike — are attempting to secure these factors to help spur the development of circular economic infrastructure."

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Somali teen earns a free education after wowing his small town by making electronic toys out of trash

Somali teen earns a free education after wowing his small town by making electronic toys out of trash | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
A Somali teenager is making a name for himself by creating electronic toys from trash.

On paper, it would be easy to write off Guled Adan Abdi’s future and miss the latent potential: he’s a thirteen-year-old living in war-torn Somalia and currently learning at the grade level of eight year-old due to missing out on years of formal schooling, family tragedy and upheaval. But this whiz kid is making a name for himself and creating a promising future by upcycling trash to make electronic toys. Abdi, who wants to produce actual cars some day, began by creating plastic toys from discarded bits of trash like old cooking oil containers. According to his mother, a widow who has struggled to provide for herself and her children, assembling plastic items was a way to keep Abdi safely occupied at home while she worked. More recently, Abdi began studying details about cars and trucks and how they work, eventually adding batteries to his inventions to introduce motion. According to the BBC, Abdi has made “four electronic toys, including a truck and a plane, mainly using plastic from old cooking oil containers… [and] he has also invented a fan that can be used as a light at night. Now a sort of local celebrity, Abdi spends his time after school creating airplanes, fans, trucks, and cars while admirers watch and encourage him. Happily, Abdi’s accomplishments have caught the eye of regional authorities, who have promised to fund his education. Meanwhile, the resourceful teen hopes to continue building and eventually sell his inventions.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Amazing!


"But this whiz kid is making a name for himself and creating a promising future by upcycling trash to make electronic toys. Abdi, who wants to produce actual cars some day, began by creating plastic toys from discarded bits of trash like old cooking oil containers."

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3D Printing with Recycled Potato Chip Bags | Mashable ("this is a fantastic upcycling idea")

3D printing is the future of fabrication, but there's one problem: It uses a lot of plastic. Enter 3D Brooklyn, a small studio that uses materials that can't...

Have you ever wondered what happens when you recycle a potato chip bag? That bag could be turned into the next 3D-printed trinket. New York-based 3D Brooklyn has teamed up with TerraCycleto transform recycled potato chip bags into 3D printer filament—an excellent step in the right direction to slowing the world’s massive waste issue. The innovative company has also begun selling their mix of 80% recycled polypropylene / 20% recycled polyethylene online.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The 3-D printer technology is already here. How about the "ink"? This video shows how one company uses laminates or plastic foils to produce the material for 3-D printer ink.

Watch the video to tickle your imagination.

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Are we about to throw away $25 trillion in waste? ("our product designers should rethink their goals")

Are we about to throw away $25 trillion in waste? ("our product designers should rethink their goals") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
The rate and nature of our consumption is choking economic growth


The average car lies idle for 90% of the day. The average power drill is used for 30 minutes of its entire life. Landfill dumps are full.

It is widely recognized that wasteful exploitation of the world’s resources is taking its toll on the environment, but it is less appreciated that the rate and nature of our consumption is choking economic growth. As much as $25 trillion could be at stake by 2050 unless we change the relationship between natural resources, customers and the market. Thanks to radical new business models and technologies, some companies are now growing by finding value in resources, assets and products that have, until now, been vastly underutilised. The circular economy is starting to turn, but more efforts are needed if we are to decouple economic growth from increasing use of natural resources.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This is what should dominate board room discussions among product manufacturers. How can our products go beyond single purpose designs and single use? How can they contribute to a circular economy?


"The circular economy is about more than recycling and managing landfill. Indeed that is a limited, one dimensional view of waste. We need to look at all four dimensions of waste as an opportunity. Find value in wasted resources that could become renewable, such as biofuel. Exploit the wasted capacity in property or assets that could find a market, such as the 60% of Europe’s truck capacity that remains empty most of the time. Reduce the wasted lifecycles that currently see products discarded rather than refurbished, often because they are not built to last or are designed for early obsolescence. Finally, secure the wasted embedded values by finding uses for otherwise rejected materials."

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Compost Pedallers Indiegogo Video ("these amazing bikers connect the dots to sustain composting")

INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN NOW LIVE! http://igg.me/at/icompost The Compost Pedallers are a bike-powered Compost recycling program. So far, we have diverted 500,000 p...
Bert Guevara's insight:

Watch this video and discover what big trucks cannot accomplish. The simplicity of the system has enormous potentials because it addresses an urban problem related to composting.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/compost-pedallers-turn-your-waste-into-food#/

 

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Customers must be at heart of circular economy, retailers agree ("behavioral changes must be modeled")

Customers must be at heart of circular economy, retailers agree ("behavioral changes must be modeled") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Retailers must be prepared to collaborate to create a 'behavioral catalyst' that will transform the circular economy concept into a viable, mainstream business model, a panel of sustainability experts has concluded. - edie news centre

The role of the consumer was considered to be the main barrier to overcome in order to truly establish a succinct, global circular economy. John Lewis is one of many in the fashion sector moving to sustainable sources of cotton in order to hit sustainability goals, but as the group's sustainability sourcing manager Eoghan Griffin pointed out, the decision wasn’t driven by consumer demand.

Griffin said: “The main issue is balancing the circular economy with the customer’s constant need for new. We’re not getting a massive demand from consumers to have sustainable products. For us, our responsibility is to meet the more general demands.”

These sentiments were echoed by Goodwin who added: “The consumer has a huge role to play but at the moment they don’t understand and are unaware. There’s a role for the retailers to be enablers and give more information.”

Providing a perspective from the electronics industry, Samsung's sustainability affairs manager Kevin Considine agreed there are still some key challenges surrounding the transition to a circular economy, but he believes servitisation could provide the answer. 

Samsung recently announced the launch of a new refurbishment business model, which encourages consumers to return unwanted or damaged goods back to the manufacturer so that they can reuse the goods to create new products.

Considine explained: “Refurbishment is an increasingly important and growing sector which would allow us to get closer to our customers. There’s always a demand for a primary product but increasingly there will be demand for refurbished products.

Considine also called for a reform of regulatory systems to allow for more efficient business models compared to the "fragmented" regulations that big businesses currently operate within. “Businesses need time to develop their own approach, rather than a rush to introduce regulation," he said, claiming he is an advocate of “more carrot, less stick” to incentivise positive change. 

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

Both producers and consumers have to team-up for the solution. There can be no cooperation unless the dialogue begins. Who will work as the arbiter? The government has tried before, but there seems to be little progress.


"Retailers must be prepared to collaborate to create a 'behavioral catalyst' that will transform the circular economy concept into a viable, mainstream business model, a panel of sustainability experts has concluded. ...

The transition to a circular economy will be centred on the behavioural changes of both producers and consumers, the panel said."

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Making wealth from waste | Water, Land and Ecosystems ("human septic waste to fertilizer pellets")

Making wealth from waste | Water, Land and Ecosystems ("human septic waste to fertilizer pellets") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

Work was in the early stages of a low-cost, mostly open-air plant that eventually is anticipated to produce 500 metric tons a year of fertilizer powder and pellets for the agriculture sector under the trademarked name “Fortifer.”
But what will be unusual about this fertilizer plant is the raw material that will be used: human waste from septic tanks and latrines in the area. To be more precise -- 12,600 cubic meters a year of waste when the plant is at full operation.

The fecal sludge to fertilizer pellet plant will be the first in West Africa under an innovative waste to food business model promoted by scientists from the International Water Management Institute (IWMI), which leads the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE). IWMI scientists are also supporting the establishment of several other public-private partnerships in Ghana.

Rapid urbanization here in Ghana and many other parts of Africa and Asia is exerting massive pressure on already strained water and land resources. WLE’s Resource Recovery and Reuse (RRR) program is striving to reduce urbanization’s negative footprint on ecosystems by safely converting human waste into a resource that benefits farmers, improves sanitation, and generates new business opportunities.

Humans generate millions of tons of solid and liquid waste every day. In the developing world, many cities don’t have adequate treatment facilities for the fecal matter. Often the waste collects in sewers, household septic tanks or pit latrines – basic toilets that collect feces in a hole in the ground. Where treatment is lacking, waste ends up in water bodies or land. This leads to pollution of the water used on farms downstream, bringing urban fecal matter back up the food chain and to the urban household table. The result of this cycle is severe environmental pollution and public health problems.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Some day, this will be a necessary process for many countries who have not solved their sewage system. That includes the Philippines.

 

"For 15 years now, IWMI and its partners have studied technological options for recycling fecal sludge to improve sanitation and create a “circular economy”. The research has resulted in the production of various forms of pathogen-free organic fertilizers, including Fortifer.

"Laboratory analysis and pilot projects in Ghana showed that Fortifer is a safe product and can improve agricultural yields by 20 percent to 50 percent compared with the use of inorganic fertilizers, while also maintaining soil health."

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BusinessWorld | PHL joins UN waste program ("lapu-lapu and general santos cities up for piloting")

BusinessWorld | PHL joins UN waste program ("lapu-lapu and general santos cities up for piloting") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it

The Philippines is one of five Asian countries taking part in the endeavor to be co-financed by all participating nations and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), which committed $7.56 million to the project’s total budget. The project was approved by the GEF back in February of this year.
Cambodia, Laos, Mongolia, and Vietnam will be joining the Philippines, with the DENR-Environmental Management Bureau (DENR-EMB) serving as the local coordinating agency.
The National Solid Waste Management Commission (NSWMC) is aiming to rectify shortcomings in the implementation of Republic Act 9003, or the Ecological Waste Management Act of 2000.
Current practice permits the release of toxic fumes, called persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, in breach of the Philippines’ international obligations. Populations must be protected under the Stockholm Convention, which addresses POPs’ impact on human health and the environment.
Best available technologies (BAT) and best environmental practices (BEP) will be introduced to Lapu-Lapu City and General Santos City as part of the UN program.

Eligio T. Ildefonso, the NSWMC executive director, acknowledged the existence of laws governing proper waste disposal, but enforcement must be strengthened.
“It’s already in the law, we just need to be more aggressive in the implementation. Especially in the prohibition of burning,” said Mr. Ildefonso said.
“We need to improve the policy to craft one specific ordinance, so we can instill in the entire city the right regulations and standards of waste management. From here, we’ll replicate this in the other cities; in a span of five years, we’ll identify other opportunities to be included in the components so if funds run out, our national government may provide” he said.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Why not in Metro Manila? UN solid waste program to pilot in Lapu-Lapu City and Gen. Santos City.

 

"Interventions for BAT will be the rehabilitation of dump sites by upgrading infrastructure, particularly the construction of recycling facilities, and the creation of a centralized system for cleaning scrap.
"For BEP, the UNIDO and the five countries will focus on improved waste collection and segregation, avoidance of waste containing chlorine or bromine content, and the technical training of waste personnel."

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7 Reasons Why Recycling Is Not a Waste: A Response to 'The Reign of Recycling' | Sustainable Brands

7 Reasons Why Recycling Is Not a Waste: A Response to 'The Reign of Recycling' | Sustainable Brands | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Recycling in the United States is an economically unsustainable trend — or at least that’s what New York Times writer John Tierney recently argued in his opinion piece, “The Reign of Recycling." Tierney’s arguments focus almost entirely on the inefficiency and economic viability of recycling, and that linear disposal methods are successful enough for the sake of cost-effectiveness and profitability. I believe that this is a dangerous conclusion to make in the 21st century, a time where the need for long-term sustainability strategies and circular waste solutions are more apparent than ever.

We know full well the function economics play in recycling. If the value of a potentially recyclable commodity is higher than collection, logistic and processing costs, there is an economic incentive to recycle. But what about obviously less recyclable materials, such as multilayered films or plastic sachet packaging — materials that are, universally, considered non-recyclable? To go along with Tierney’s argument, landfilling and incineration are the only economically viable alternatives.

This focus on short-term economic viability is problematic, as it disregards the critical need for a more circular system of manufacturing and consumption. We don’t push for better education or health care based on whether they are economically justifiable institutions — we do it because there is a social imperative. Telling corporations and the public that recycling — save for a very select few materials — is essentially a waste undermines the need for more comprehensive strategies supporting sustainable development: reusing materials when we can, recycling those materials when we can’t, and decreasing the consumption of unsustainable materials bound for landfill.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Our world is a finite source of raw materials needed by a consumption-driven economy. Recycling cannot be removed from the equation of sustainability.


"Recycled material in general can be a great way to build supply chain security overall. My company, for example, works with dozens of manufacturers to facilitate the collection and recycling of their pre- and post-consumer product and packaging waste. In a variety of these partnerships, after aggregating the collected waste we send it back to the manufacturer, where the recycled material is reintegrated into existing supply chains. It reduces waste and costs, and gives the company a competitive edge in the market."

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The 5p plastic bag charge: All you need to know - BBC News ("a more sustainable and practical policy")

The 5p plastic bag charge: All you need to know - BBC News ("a more sustainable and practical policy") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
On 5 October supermarkets in England will start charging 5p for using plastic bags. Here's a breakdown of everything you need to know about the price hike.

Shoppers are to be charged 5p for every new plastic bag they use at large stores in England.

The charge applies only to shops or chains with 250 or more full-time employees.

Plastic bags at airport shops or on board trains, planes or ships, will not be included, and neither will paper bags.

England is the last country in the UK to start charging for plastic bags.

The number of plastic bags handed out by supermarkets in England in 2014 rose to 7.64bn - 200 million more than in 2013.

Figures collected by waste-reduction body Wrap, on behalf of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), show that the figure has steadily increased for the past four years.

In 2010 almost 6.3bn were used.

Campaigners argue that the bags blight streets, spoil the countryside, and damage wildlife, seas and coastline.

Ministers think introducing a 5p charge will stop shoppers using as many new bags, and encourage people to re-use old ones.

The government hopes to see an 80% reduction in plastic bag use in supermarkets, and a 50% fall on the high street.

Over the next decade it hopes the charge will raise:

Up to £730m for good causes£60m savings in litter clean-up costs£13m in carbon savings

The charge was a policy championed by the Liberal Democrats in the previous coalition government.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The more guilty culprit is the FREE plastic shopping bag. It's lack of value makes it a candidate to become a piece of garbage. 

By putting a tax or fee for its use, automatically changes the behavior of the plastic shopping bag user. Conservatively, an 80% reduction can be easily realized.

 

"Ministers think introducing a 5p charge will stop shoppers using as many new bags, and encourage people to re-use old ones.

"The government hopes to see an 80% reduction in plastic bag use in supermarkets, and a 50% fall on the high street."

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Sustainable, low carbon, synthetic concrete to be made in Wales from recycled plastic waste diverted from landfill

Sustainable, low carbon, synthetic concrete to be made in Wales from recycled plastic waste diverted from landfill | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Affresol is planning to create more than 60 roles at its site on Swansea West Business Park over the next three years

“Affresol has made a considerable investment in developing what is a highly innovative product and I am pleased the Welsh Government is supporting its expansion that will increase capacity to meet existing and emerging markets and create jobs.”

Mr McPherson said: “This is an exciting and challenging time for the company. The opportunity in the Rail sector has huge potential both here in the UK and across the rest of the EU. This investment will be the platform that will enable Affresol to be in prime position to capitalize on the upgrading of the rail sector over the next 25 years.

“Support from the Welsh Government will help us build and install a new hi-tech automated production line and expand our base in Swansea, creating jobs for local people.”

TPR® synthetic concrete sections provide a more effective and sustainable alternative to a traditional concrete sectional garage and are supplied to Housing Associations and secure parking service providers across the whole of the UK.

These prefabricated outbuildings are secure, flexible and affordable and used as storage units and enclosures for a number of uses including mobility scooter storage, ground source heat pumps, housing electrical equipment, and water tank storage for sprinkler systems. They are even being used as Beach Huts by some local authorities.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This is the solid waste management direction I wish the Philippines is heading to. Changing the consumer mindset on recycling should be accompanied with viable alternatives to dumping. The present government policy of dumping in landfills is planting a wrong disposal mindset on its people.

 

"The company has developed TPR (Thermo Polymerized Rock) – a sustainable, low carbon, synthetic concrete product using recycled mixed plastic waste diverted from landfill."

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Isle Of Bute Becomes A Zero Waste Island - CIWM Journal Online ("this is the second of its kind")

Isle Of Bute Becomes A Zero Waste Island - CIWM Journal Online ("this is the second of its kind") | Global Recycling Movement | Scoop.it
Scotland’s second Zero Waste Town was launched thanks to the backing of a national waste reduction campaign led by Zero Waste Scotland.

The Isle of Bute is the second part of Scotland so far to join the Zero Waste Towns initiative, which harnesses the efforts of residents and businesses to reduce waste, recycle more, and use resources – such as waste electrical equipment – efficiently.

Fyne Futures Ltd, a charity committed to environmental sustainability on the Isle of Bute, will receive support worth £200,000 to implement the initiative locally via a series of projects over the next two years.

Last year, Dunbar in East Lothian became Scotland’s first Zero Waste Town. Both Dunbar and Bute join a growing network of Zero Waste municipalities throughout Europe and across the world, including towns in Holland, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Slovenia and Romania.

Iain Gulland, Chief Executive of Zero Waste Scotland, said: “The Zero Waste Towns initiative recognises the crucial role that communities play in changing people’s behaviour to reduce and prevent waste. Both Zero Waste Scotland and our partners at the Scottish Government are committed to promoting community-level action in as many towns in Scotland as possible in order to meet our target recycling rate of 70 per cent and reduce waste by 15 percent in Scotland by 2025.

“As part of this intensive approach, our first priority on Bute will be to inspire, educate and empower communities with the knowledge and skills to prevent waste, increase resource efficiency and thus reduce landfill costs and create jobs. We will also look at the impact and outcomes of each project to help us make the most of similar future projects within other Scottish communities.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

A number of community-led initiatives will be introduced, including:

- The launch of an enhanced recycling collection trial in the Bush/Serpentine area, to deliver recycling kits to over 500 households with the objective of increasing the current 40% participation rate to 90%.  A larger variation of plastic types will be accepted and kerbside textile collection will be offered;

- The introduction of a pilot food waste collection service with up to 50 households and a training hub for food composting;

- Additional recycling facilities;

- The launch of a community engagement programme to raise awareness of the multiple benefits of waste prevention and increase volunteers;

- The launch of a programme aimed at local businesses to help them to make changes necessary to prevent waste and increase resource efficiency;

- A project to set up the facilities needed to launch a collection and re-use service for used and waste electrical equipment (UEEE and WEEE)Increasing the quantity and quality of the recyclable goods collected, including biodegradable waste

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