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Car That Runs On Garbage

Car That Runs On Garbage | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Car that runs on garbage - A new technology to convert your car to run on trash and how does this really actually works.

As I said earlier, in order to turn garbage into gas we need a gasifier. The transformation process is called gasification. A more technical explanation for gasification is the conversion of nearly any solid dryorganic matter into a flammable fuel. The thermo-chemical process converts coal, petro-coke or biomass into a gas consisting of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Under the proper conditions, it can be a useful energy extracting process, but also it can be a waste stream disposal system.

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Zero Waste World
Big and small efforts worldwide to manage waste
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Watch Your Dead Tech Get Demolished at an E-Waste Recycling Plant - YouTube ("this is how it ends")

It's called e-waste, and it's made of millions of broken, dead, and obsolete gadgets. But often, it's too toxic (and too valuable) just to toss in a dumpster...

It's called e-waste, and it's made of millions of broken, dead, and obsolete gadgets. But often, it's too toxic (and too valuable) just to toss in a dumpster. So it gets recycled. We visited an e-waste recycling facility in upstate New York to see the afterlife of dead tech for ourselves. This video captures what we saw.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This is a good and simple example of how to handle e-waste. Watch the video.

With the Filipino's crazy appetite for new gadgets, our country needs facilities like this.

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Canada’s Largest Food Retailer To Sell Ugly Produce At Low Prices To Cut Food Waste

Canada’s Largest Food Retailer To Sell Ugly Produce At Low Prices To Cut Food Waste | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Most food waste ends up in landfills, where it decomposes and releases methane, a greenhouse gas much more potent than carbon dioxide.

Loblaws, the country’s largest food retailer, launched a campaign last week to sell misshapen, “ugly” produce at a discounted rate in an effort to curb the country’s food waste problem (annually, Canadians waste some 40 percent of their food).

The campaign, called No Name Naturally Imperfect, offers aesthetically displeasing apples and potatoes at a discount of up to 30 cents in select Loblaws-owned stores in Ontario and Quebec. “We often focus too much on the look of produce rather than the taste,” said Ian Gordon, senior vice president, Loblaw Brands, Loblaw Companies Limited, in a press statement. “Once you peel or cut an apple you can’t tell it once had a blemish or was misshapen.”

According to the U.N. Environment Program, between 20 and 40 percent of produce is thrown away by farmers simply because it isn’t pretty enough for grocery store shelves. The produce being sold under Loblaws’ new campaign would have been used for juices or soups, or might not have been harvested at all, due to their appearance. Though the campaign is beginning with apples and potatoes, company officials hope that the program will serve as a springboard for the sale of other ugly fruits and vegetables in the future.

The move offers savings to both the consumer, who can access healthy produce at lower costs, and the Canadian government, which loses some $31 billion dollars annually on food waste. Globally, food waste costs nearly $400 billion annually, but according to a February report released by the U.K.-based Waste & Resources Action Program (WRAP), countries could save between $120 and $300 each year by focusing on reducing food waste.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Who says that the world doesn't produce enough food? Check this out and discover that there are many ways of curbing food waste, even in the Philippines. With the proliferation of supermarkets, I wonder how much is wasted because of appearance?

"In developed nations, food waste happens most often at the retail and consumer level. Grocery stores often adhere to strict quality guidelines that place too much emphasis on appearance, leading to the disposal of produce that is nutritionally sound but not aesthetically pleasing. Each year, enough unspoiled food is thrown away in developed nations to feed the world’s 870 million hungry people."

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Slimming down food waste could save European businesses £7bn a year ("need smarter ways to avoid")

Slimming down food waste could save European businesses £7bn a year ("need smarter ways to avoid") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
New Rabobank report urges supermarkets to work with their suppliers to encourage the use of innovative new technologies to reduce waste

The biggest losses occur in the market for fruit and vegetables, where the supply chain accounts for 72 per cent and 66 per cent of waste respectively, and leads to total losses worth around €28bn (£20.1bn) per year. Wasted starchy root vegetables also account for around €8bn (£5.8bn) in industry losses.

The report highlights how a range of new packaging technologies, such as It'sFresh! and PerfoTec, which prolong the life of fruit and vegetables, new harvesting machinery that can reduce damage to crops and the use of new food storage systems, can all help slash waste levels.

However, current business models do not always reward this kind of efficiency. For example, why would a wholesaler want to reduce food waste in a way that means a customer will buy less? Bosch said retailers needed to work with growers, packagers and wholesalers to overcome these challenges and incentivise them to invest in new technologies.

"Overcoming this 'split incentive', where costs and benefits fall to different parties, requires an innovative approach to supply chain partnerships and business models," said Bosch.

Benefits would not only include increased shelf life, but also opening up new geographical markets and reducing the cost of dealing with stock that has passed its use by date, the report argues.

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

This food waste problem is the same in the Philippines.

Calling on our economic geniuses or guys with better common sense to figure out this problem. The benefits of minimizing food waste is not always a "win-win" for all stakeholders, but definitely a "must-win" for the environment.

"... why would a wholesaler want to reduce food waste in a way that means a customer will buy less? Bosch said retailers needed to work with growers, packagers and wholesalers to overcome these challenges and incentivise them to invest in new technologies.

"Implementing innovations for food waste reduction should start with selecting partners that understand and attach a value to all of the potential benefits of reducing waste – partners that are willing to work towards realising these benefits,"

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The art of upcycling ("changing the way people look at waste leads to behavioral changes")

The art of upcycling ("changing the way people look at waste leads to behavioral changes") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Re-purposing discarded objects through art and design could inspire consumers to be more conscious and provide solutions to the worlds waste problems.

From medical advancements, to creating masterful pieces of art, travelling vast oceans, to building cities, inventing the lightbulb, to developing the internet, humans are capable of creating greatness, but our ingenuity comes with its problems. 
‘As a species were are just too damn clever,’ said Dr Brandon Gien, CEO of Good Design Australia in a recent panel at Link Festival.  ‘We have designed ourselves into this world and as a result there are some significant challenges facing our planet as a result of our own ingenuity.
‘It is a case of taking a step back and saying we got ourselves into this mess, we can design ourselves out of it as well.’ 
This mess has a lot to do with excessive consumption and the waste we produce. Australia is one of the highest waste producers in the world, producing the equivalent of three million garbage trucks full of compacted rubbish each year. 
But an art movement may have the answer: upcycling. Nathan Devine, creator ofRetrash – an online platform that showcases upcycling innovation from artists and designers around the world – said that rethinking waste ‘represents a small part of the solution to our growing problem’. 
Devine said Retrash is an ‘inspirational platform’ designed to get people thinking about how we can reuse everyday objects. ‘[Upcycling] is about two things: first it’s about reconsidering the amount of things that we buy and the waste that creates, and secondly how we can rethink second-hand materials by adding value to them.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Creative up-cycling can make a difference in the behavioral aspect of waste management, which is an important component of the solution.

"‘The philosophy behind Retrash celebrates the creative arts element of upcycling, while at the same time improving our environment by reconsidering our connection to it,’ said Devine."

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Ask Umbra: Is my compost pile contributing to climate change? ("can composting be methane-free? yes!")

Ask Umbra: Is my compost pile contributing to climate change? ("can composting be methane-free? yes!") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
A reader worries that her banana peels are giving off bad gas. Umbra forks over some scrappy advice.

Backyard composting sounds almost too good to be true, doesn’t it? You divert food scraps from the landfill and create an ultra-enriching soil booster that nourishes crops and gardens — and you do it all right out the back door so there’s no fuel used in shipping. So where’s the catch? Well, under certain conditions, decomposing matter does produce methane — a highly potent greenhouse gas 20 times worse for the climate than carbon dioxide. But here’s the unequivocally good news: Your compost pile doesn’t have to. With the right management, backyard compost can indeed be methane-free.

Here’s why: Methane forms under anaerobic, or zero-oxygen, conditions. Just like what’s found inside a landfill, you say? Exactly. Sealed inside landfills (where 96 percent of our orange peels and coffee grounds go, by the way), food waste slowly rots, spewing methane as it goes. Our trash heaps account for 17 percent of all U.S. methane emissions.

I should point out, Adriana, that not all that methane flies into the atmosphere to further warm the globe. We do have the technology to harvest and burn the gas to generate electricity, reducing it to water and carbon dioxide (which officials don’t count against us on the climate change scale because decomposing organic matter releases it naturally anyway). Happy face: Powering your fridge with methane means you’re not tapping a fossil fuel source. Sad face: These projects are limited in scope.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Composting can be methane-free, if properly managed.

"And really, that’s it. Composting takes a little trial and error to get right, but that’s essentially what it takes to run a tight, methane-free ship. The steps are simple, yet classically important."

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Innovative Startup Sells Coffee Grounds to Fuel Cars and Power Buildings » EcoWatch ("cool fuel idea")

Innovative Startup Sells Coffee Grounds to Fuel Cars and Power Buildings » EcoWatch ("cool fuel idea") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Bio-bean, a new London-based company, is upcycling coffee grounds into biofuel, which can help power buildings and fuel cars while reducing waste. Coffee shops

With 200,000 tons of coffee grounds produced in London annually, the potential of pulp-into-power can be massive. Bio-bean doesn’t just collect used grounds from local coffee shops, they also target roasting and freeze-dried coffee facilities.

After collecting the grounds, the company transports it to their processing plant in north London where machines turn these old grinds into biomass pellets and biodiesel in a patented process. This carbon-neutral fuel is then sold to businesses to power buildings and vehicles.

Coffee shops usually pay to have their grounds incinerated, taken to an anaerobic digestion plants or dumped in a landfill, where it releases harmful greenhouse gases, the company points out on their website. But with bio-bean, coffee grounds go further than giving you your morning fix.

“Bio-bean is aligned closely with the concept of the circular economy,” Kay told Co.Exist. “We view waste more as a valuable resource, simply in the wrong place.” (If you’d like to give a second life to your own coffee waste, try composting).


Bert Guevara's insight:

As a coffee-lover, I like this idea.

"Bio-bean says they can save up to 53,200 barrels of oil a year, or the same as driving a London bus around the world 7,675 times. That’s not to mention that the company uses its own biofuel to power their fleet of trucks that’s used to collect coffee waste.

“Bio-bean uses a cradle-to-cradle business model, which means we use a waste product and turn it into something of value.” Kay says in the video. “London produces over 200,000 tons of waste coffee annually. Bio-bean hopes to tap into this resource in order to offset some of London’s energy demands.”

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Growing recycling programs help us inch closer to Zero Waste ("so much to learn from new methods")

Growing recycling programs help us inch closer to Zero Waste ("so much to learn from new methods") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Looking beyond traditional recyclables and the "blue bin", here are some of the organizations and companies seeking to redefine what we consider trash with alternative recycling initiatives and methods of reuse.

Much of our time is often devoted to increasing the recycling rates of more conventional recyclable materials. That is: aluminum, paper, PET and HDPE plastic containers, and glass. There are large markets for these materials, so it makes a lot of sense to further build the recycling infrastructure for them.

Even so, there are countless other waste streams that we still struggle to unpin the “non-recyclable” label from. But where municipal systems for complicated waste streams fail or are lacking, a growing number of alternative programs from third-party organizations are rising up and changing our perceptions of garbage and waste.

Some are smaller and highly targeted programs from socially responsible companies, while others are broad reclamation and reuse initiatives operated by nonprofits and entire municipalities. All of them are proving that viable recycling and reuse solutions, even for some of our most complicated waste streams, are possible.

Bert Guevara's insight:

There are so many new possibilities in recycling which need to be put in place, such as:

Greywater

Building Material Recycling

Recycling E-Waste

Undergarments

Converting Plastic to Oil

Styrofoam and Polystyrene Recycling

Recyclebank

Battery Recycling

Zero Waste Box

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Toxic E-Waste Piles Up as Manufacturers End Free Recycling ("cheap gadgets = more e-waste disposed")

Toxic E-Waste Piles Up as Manufacturers End Free Recycling ("cheap gadgets = more e-waste disposed") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Some 55 million pounds of e-waste could be recycled in 2015, but that's not likely to happen despite laws on the books

“It’s a shame,’’ said Sen. Bob Smith (D-Middlesex), the chairman of the Senate Environment and Energy Committee. “Our program is not working well.’’
It is no small problem. A projection from the state Department of Environmental Protection, estimates that approximately 55 million pounds of e-waste material could be recycled in 2015, according to John Purves, an attorney who represents some of the recycling facilities.
Whether that goal can be achieved, however, is questionable, considering changes in the marketplace.
Manufacturers used to accept the e-waste for free, but are now balking at doing so. Counties and towns that had to pay recyclers are bailing out of the program because of higher costs, according to Purves.
“This problem is going to get worse,’’ he said. “I fear a big rise in illegal dumping. It only works if the cost of recycling is borne by manufactures, which is not happening today.’’
The result is that some of the waste ends up being stored in county Department of Works warehouses, instead of being recycled, according to Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Sierra Club.
“A lot of towns have stopped recycling the stuff and the DEP not enforcing the law,’’ Tittel said.
In part, that is because many municipalities and counties have reduced their workforces, Purves said.
To fix the problem, Purves said the state should require manufacturers of electronic equipment to accept an unlimited amount of material to be recycled.

Bert Guevara's insight:

We need a win-win solution for everyone to do his part - consumer, government and industry.

"To fix the problem, Purves said the state should require manufacturers of electronic equipment to accept an unlimited amount of material to be recycled."

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House OKs bill penalizing dumping of ships waste into sea ("another good law that awaits enforcement")

House OKs bill penalizing dumping of ships waste into sea ("another good law that awaits enforcement") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
The House of Representatives has approved on third and final reading a measure that will prevent and control pollution caused by waste materials from ships.

The House of Representatives has approved on third and final reading a measure that will prevent and control pollution caused by waste materials from ships.
Among the prohibited acts under the bill are the discharge of oil, oily mixture, noxious liquid substances, and other harmful substances in packaged form, sewage, garbage from any Philippine ship or any other ship while within Philippine waters.
House Bill 5377 seeks to implement the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from ships or Marpol 73/78, including its annexes and subsequent amendments.
The measure, known as the proposed “Prevention of Pollution from Ships Act,” shall cover Philippine ships, wherever they may be found, and foreign-flagged ships, whether or not they are registered with state parties to the Convention.
Exempted from the coverage of the proposed law, however, are warships, naval auxiliary ships and man-of-war vessels.
A violator may face a fine ranging from P200,000 to P10 million, while the dumping of garbage or sewage will pay not less than P25,000, but not more than P2 million.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This is an important development in solid waste management. If we are complaining about ocean garbage, then we have to help the government enforce this new law.

The meat is in the IRR (Implementing Rules and Regulations) and of course, the implementation.

"A violator may face a fine ranging from P200,000 to P10 million, while the dumping of garbage or sewage will pay not less than P25,000, but not more than P2 million.
"A corresponding fine ranging from P200,000 to P10 million will be slapped on ships that emit other harmful substances.
"HB 5377 creates the Marine Pollution Adjudication Board with quasi-judicial powers to hear marine pollution cases."

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Bert Guevara's curator insight, February 16, 1:00 AM

This is an important development in solid waste management. If we are complaining about ocean garbage, then we have to help the government enforce this new law.

The meat is in the IRR (Implementing Rules and Regulations) and of course, the implementation.

"A violator may face a fine ranging from P200,000 to P10 million, while the dumping of garbage or sewage will pay not less than P25,000, but not more than P2 million.
"A corresponding fine ranging from P200,000 to P10 million will be slapped on ships that emit other harmful substances.
"HB 5377 creates the Marine Pollution Adjudication Board with quasi-judicial powers to hear marine pollution cases."

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25 new uses for old jars ("reuse involves creativity; you won't run out of ideas")

25 new uses for old jars ("reuse involves creativity; you won't run out of ideas") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
If you have a jumble of jars that need jobs, consider calling them into service for any of these tasks.

1. Contain goopy cakes

2. Show off your souvenirs

3. Tame an unruly button collection

4. Load them up at the grocery store

5. Light a lantern

6. Create a sanctuary for succulents

7. Poach perfect eggs

8. Constrain your spools and assorted junk

9. Hatch a tiny forest

10. Whip up some homemade hostess gifts

11. Create a cloche for crafted treasures

12. Bring a salad to work

13. Sprout sprouts

14. Swing a chandelier

15. Construct a parfait

(and many more ....)

Bert Guevara's insight:

"Given the choice, most of us treehugging types will opt for a product that comes housed in glass rather than plastic. There's the satisfying heft of a jar, the clink in the shopping cart, the lack of leaching chemicals, and the ease of recycling ... among other things.

"Glass jars rock. But perhaps one of their most beguiling traits is also one of their most bedeviling: Their potential for reuse.

"Because although the possibilities are many, the empty jars – eagerly waiting to fulfill some type of practical function – seem to proliferate like rabbits in the cabinet.

"They're too useful to toss, but how many applications do you actually employ them in? If you have a jumble of jars that need jobs, consider calling them into service for any of the following tasks."

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KidsGardening.org - Carton 2 Garden - YouTube ("great corporate CSR project to start them young")

Evergreen Packaging and KidsGardening.org are proud to present our first national Carton 2 Garden Contest!

School gardens can provide a number of benefits to students, teachers, and schools, and can serve as living laboratories where kids can observe, learn, and experiment, while also growing fresh food and nurturing a healthy appetite for good clean fun. And although some school and urban garden programs are very successful at what they do, and are inspiring kids and their families to get more involved with their food system, we've still got a long way to go before every school has their own garden, even if it's just a small one.

One strategy for schools, teachers, and parents to help boost a school garden program in their community (or to help start one) is to start small and think creatively, using the resources at hand, in order to attract more interest and funding for the project, and to then expand it as more resources become available. The Carton 2 Garden contest, which offers prizes of up to $2500 USD for building or enhancing school gardens, is centered around using something which is present at just about every school in the country, the humble milk and juice carton.

Bert Guevara's insight:

I like this project. Can we have local corporate sponsors (who use composite packaging) pick up the tab?

"The Carton 2 Garden contest, which is open to any public, private, or charter K-12 school in the US, is looking for the most creative or most appropriate use of repurposed juice and milk cartons in a school garden."

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Plastic film, bag recycling campaign hits Dunn County ("education, recovery & recycling of plastic")

Plastic film, bag recycling campaign hits Dunn County ("education, recovery & recycling of plastic") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
To create awareness about plastic film and bag recycling, the Dunn County Solid Waste Division is launching a new advertising campaign. Educating people about what types of plastic film and

The ad campaign playfully compares recycling to reincarnation, giving new life to old materials. Featured in the ads are a digging dog who was formerly an archeologist, and a plastic lumber fence that used to be a bread bag. The ads were created by Flapjack Creative of Wausau. Funding to create the ads came from a grant through the Dunn County Community Foundation, while placement of the ads is funded by the American Chemistry Council.

The Dunn County Solid Waste Division has been working to energize and educate the public about plastic film and bag recycling since last summer.

In 2014, Dunn County was chosen as part of a pilot program for a nationwide public outreach initiative aimed at increasing the recycling of plastic film packaging. The pilot program, called WRAP (Wrap Recycling Action Program) is made possible through coordination of both local and national organizations including the American Chemistry Council, Flexible Film Recycling Group, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Indianhead Enterprises, Inc. and Trex Company, Inc.

The Dunn County Solid Waste Division and the City of Menomonie initially kicked off their plastic film and bag recycling program by designating June as “Plastic Film and Bag Recycling Awareness Month.” Area Collection Stations and the Transfer Station began accepting plastic film such as dry cleaning bags, newspaper bags, plastic wrap around napkins, toilet paper, bottled water, etc. in addition to traditional grocery bags.

Thanks to a partnership with Indianhead Enterprises, the plastic film and bags collected by Dunn County are recycled into composite decking by Trex Company, Inc. Dunn County hopes the new campaign will teach residents to recycle plastic film and bags, as well as encourage businesses to recycle items such as stretch wrap, pallet wrap, furniture wrap, retail bags and more.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The trend towards educated use and recovery of plastic bags goes a long way in sustainable waste management policies. The consumers will pick up any "smart" program that does not 'punish' the public.

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Two women turn upcycled fashion into an award-winning business ("world needs more women like them")

Two women turn upcycled fashion into an award-winning business ("world needs more women like them") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it

dLook At Me Designs transforms old sweaters and tee shirts into fresh new styles.

The company creates flirty skirts, tees, texting gloves, hats and scarves from recycled materials, all in Plainville. For the tee-shirt skirts, they find materials at thrift stores—which gives them control over colors and patterns. For sweaters, they buy materials by the bale.

“The most hideous sweater can become the cutest gloves,” said Brown. She and Peddle buy sweaters by the pound from a textiles grader, who sorts through the clothing donations that can’t be sold in thrift shops. These bales of clothes are typically shipped overseas, but Look At Me Designs found a use for them here in the U.S.

Both women work on the designs, and collaborate with independent sewers in the area to produce the items. Brown said that they use scraps to create embellishments, and if any garments are still in good condition but can’t be used, they donate them.

“It’s a challenge to see what we have, and what we can do with it,” said Peddle. For example, bulky sweaters that couldn’t be turned into skirts inspired the pair to make texting gloves, which have become popular sellers. The thick sweaters are also turned into boot-toppers, which double as leg warmers.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Are you looking for a unique career?

"Scaling up the business has not been without its challenges, as some retailers expect to know exactly how every item will look in advance. “We encourage people to understand that each piece is unique,” said Peddle. When the company sells their goods wholesale, they incentivize shops to be flexible about color palettes by offering better prices—which in turn helps them recycle more."

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Island residents start Facebook page to shame illegal garbage dumpers ("the social media weapon")

Island residents start Facebook page to shame illegal garbage dumpers ("the social media weapon") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
A few residents have banded together on social media to start the Facebook page 'Stop Illegal Garbage Dumping - Vancouver Island'.

Some residents are continuing to dump garbage illegally on the nature trails and in the forests and Guilfoy wants it to stop.

She, along with a few other residents, have banded together on social media to start the Facebook page ‘Stop Illegal Garbage Dumping – Vancouver Island‘. It only started six days ago and already has more than 3,500 likes.

“I was so sick of somebody dumping [garbage] up the road from my house,” says Guilfoy. “When it gets cleaned up, it is dumped there again.”

The garbage includes household items, furniture, car batteries, tires, bikes and lots of mail, with names, addresses and personal details clearly visible.

Gilfoy says they have contacted people whose mail has been found in the garbage but they have decided against putting the details on the Facebook page. “I don’t want to destroy someone’s life,” she says, as they don’t know if the person whose mail is dumped is the person who dumped it there.

“We just want to bring awareness of how big the issue is, to show people there are repercussions, the [Regional District of Nanaimo] is following up,” she says.

“We also want to bring awareness to identity theft. We found credit card statements, insurance papers, it’s crazy.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

This community is using social media to shame the illegal garbage dumpers. In the Philippines, this can be a good idea to mobilize citizens.

"She, along with a few other residents, have banded together on social media to start the Facebook page ‘Stop Illegal Garbage Dumping – Vancouver Island‘. It only started six days ago and already has more than 3,500 likes.

“I was so sick of somebody dumping [garbage] up the road from my house,” says Guilfoy. “When it gets cleaned up, it is dumped there again.”

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How expiring fruits and veggies can help end hunger ("preserving food before it rots extends use")

How expiring fruits and veggies can help end hunger ("preserving food before it rots extends use") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
How do you feed 9 billion people by 2050? Graduate students propose to extend the life of about-to-expire fruits and vegetables

.

Freeze-drying food can preserve micronutrients, thus helping people, especially children, reduce the risk of hunger and malnutrition.

No complex machinery is needed aside from the one used in freeze-drying the product, making it less expensive compared to other consumables used by several organizations. The target price for selling is only $2 (P80).

FoPo will take advance of the strict regulations requiring companies to sell their expiring produce by buying these from them at a cheaper price and transporting them to the processing facility to freeze-dry them.

Before selling to retailers and organizations, the freeze-dried products are put through a simple pulverizer to convert them into powder form.

Once purchased, consumers can use these powdered fruits and vegetables in making food products such as healthy juices, porridges, and even sandwich spreads.

The concept won in the recently concluded Thought For Food Challenge on February 14, 2015 in Lisbon, Portugal. The event encouraged members of the food industry to come up with social entrepreneurship business ideas to help address the problem of food insecurity.

Gerard Marin, one of the two Filipino members of the team, said that the concept is also effective especially in emergency situations.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Another great idea that can be used to reduce food waste.

"The creators of FoPo emphasized that food insecurity does not come from the lack of food. To address hunger, the problems in the existing food system should be fixed.

“The world does not need to produce more food to feed the population,” Marin said. “People just have to see the value from the inefficiency of the current food system, and create a sustainable, innovative, and socially relevant business out of it.”

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7 wastes Lean Six Sigma - YouTube ("tips from the #1 car manufacturer; identify the waste and solve it")

The 7 wastes of Lean six sigma, otherwise known as the 8 wastes if you include the most important waste - the waste of under utilised talent within your orga...

The reduction and elimination of waste is core to lean manufacturing. But what do we mean by waste? What types of waste exist? Well 7 types of waste (or Muda) were originally classified by Taiichi Ohno, the Chief Engineer at Toyota.  By reducing waste in all its forms, processes become more efficient, more productive and produce fewer defects. As we’ve seen lean manufacturing is all about adding value for the customer. Waste does not add value. So when we eliminate waste, by definition, we add value. Let’s take a look at the different types of waste.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The reduction and elimination of waste is core to lean manufacturing. 

1. Overproduction

2. Waiting

3. Transporting

4. Inappropriate Processing

5. Unnecessary Inventory

6. Unnecessary Motions

7. Defects

In addition to the 7 original wastes, a new one is sometimes quoted. This is the Waste of Untapped Human Potential. The idea here is all the other wastes are only effective if you get the whole workforce involved. 

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The Zero Waste Dream ("it starts with the decision; then the assessment; next is the lifestyle change")

The Zero Waste Dream ("it starts with the decision; then the assessment; next is the lifestyle change") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Advocates are turning that dream into reality!

There have been a few vocal minorities in the crowd of many who claim they have adopted waste-free lifestyles. In addition to refraining from plastic usage, these waste-free diehards have made other lifestyle choices. They’ve replaced their trash bins with refuse and recycling bins, and they’ve adopted a minimalist mantra that some people could deem counter-cultural. 

One of the most well known zero-wasters is Bea Johnson, author of the bestselling book, “Zero Waste Home.” 

“Since embarking on the zero waste lifestyle, our lives have changed for the better,” Johnson explained on her website. “We feel happier and lead more meaningful lives, based on experiences instead of stuff. My goal is to share (zero waste’s) incredible health, financial and time-saving benefits.” 

Throughout her book and website, Johnson frequently chronicles how she has led a waste-free lifestyle. As a starting point, she recommends people consider what she deems the five “Rs”: 

• Refuse what you do not need.

• Reduce what you do need.

• Reuse what you consume.

• Recycle what you cannot put in a refuse pile or reuse for future consumption.

• Rot (compost) the rest.

Johnson offers an array of tidbits for people serious about taking a crack at the zero-waste lifestyle. She swears by mason jars for food storage and oftentimes buys in bulk. In lieu of paper products, Johnson uses ceramic dishes and cloth napkins for food storage and clean up, respectively.

In an example of how deeply she has pondered this topic, Johnson also encourages people to flee from the long-running free pencil and pen giveaways. When she needs to scribe something by hand, Johnson instead uses pens equipped with refillable ink. 

There are other indirect ways people can contribute to the zero-waste lifestyle, according to Johnson. For those embarking on gardening activities this spring, for example, consider leaving room for a compost pile. After all, food waste needs to go somewhere if you’re ditching the garbage can!

Bert Guevara's insight:

The hope is for every person in the planet to generate less waste on a daily basis. This means individual decisions based on their personal value system -- not all people look at waste in the same way!

With continuing education and a corresponding change in the design and engineering of our environment, the zero waste lifestyle can make a significant dent in our total waste generation (approx 10-13k tons per day in Metro Manila).

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How Uganda is turning waste into power ("choice of recycling technology should fulfill a need")

How Uganda is turning waste into power ("choice of recycling technology should fulfill a need") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
A pilot project to turn that waste into biogas is getting started this month in Uganda, Ethiopia and Tanzania, writes Sophie Mbugua.

At the Kampala City Abattoir, the changeover is already underway.

To turn waste into power, the slaughterhouse puts its waste and wastewater through a fermentation process that releases methane, which is then captured and burned to produce electricity.

The facility uses the biogas it produces to power its generator.

“We are generating on average about 10 to 15 cubic metres of biogas daily,” said Joseph Kyambadde, head of biochemistry at Makerere University and one of those involved with the project.

“With 60 cubic metres of gas we (would be) able to run about 15 security lights, 15 deep freezers and 15 refrigerators at the abattoir, helping save around 8 million Ugandan shillings ($2,800) per month,” he said.

To add to the project’s green credentials, it uses solar panels to heat water and raise the temperature in the digester, to allow it to produce the most burnable methane, said Robinson Odong, a biological sciences lecturer at Makerere University and a manager of the biogas project.

Besides helping the slaughterhouse get around the city’s frequent blackouts, using biogas for energy has cut the plant’s monthly diesel bill by 90 percent.

“We are now spending 300,000 Ugandan shillings ($105) per month on diesel instead of 3.5 million shillings ($1,200), as the generator now runs on biogas during power blackouts,” said Nsubuga Muhamed, the Kampala City Abattoir secretary.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Solving a waste problem by producing needed energy.

“We are an energy-poor country, with 95 percent of rural households having no access to electricity,” said Ronald Kaggwa, an environmental economist at the Uganda National Environmental Management Authority.

"If the biogas project is scaled up, it could allow Ugandans who live too far from the power grid to generate their own energy, he said.

"And if the country could turn more of its waste and wastewater into biogas, it would also be closer to its goals of switching to greener power sources and reducing deforestation, officials say."

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Recleim Opens Closed-Loop Recycling Facility ("focus on resource recovery thru de-manufacturing")

Recleim Opens Closed-Loop Recycling Facility ("focus on resource recovery thru de-manufacturing") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Recycling services provider Recleim has opened its $40.6 million flagship center in Graniteville, South Carolina — the first facility in North America to feature an entirely closed-loop resource recovery process, t...

Recycling services provider Recleim has opened its $40.6 million flagship center in Graniteville, South Carolina — the first facility in North America to feature an entirely closed-loop resource recovery process, the company says.

Using exclusively licensed recycling technologies, Recleim de-manufacturers household appliances, HVAC systems, vending machines and related electronics into commodities — such as plastic, aluminum, copper, steel and pelletized foam — that are sold for reuse.

The company says it reduces landfill waste by recovering 95 percent of components in the appliances it processes and properly disposing of non-recyclable materials.

Recleim has already announced several agreements with companies to process their equipment including BSH Home Appliances, Pepsi Bottling Ventures and the South Carolina.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This type of "de-manufacturing" facility which focuses on resource recovery is needed in many countries, including the Philippines. With the increasing volume of electric appliances and e-gadgets, which significantly contribute to landfill trash, "closed-loop" recovery and recycling facilities like this are urgently needed.

The $40.6M price tag is quite high for a developing country like the Philippines, but with more manual labor, it can be set up a lot cheaper.

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Good news! Another ‘Zero Waste’ grocery store opens in France ("new behavioral options make a diff")

Good news! Another ‘Zero Waste’ grocery store opens in France ("new behavioral options make a diff") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
High quality bulk ingredients, as long as you bring your own container -- sounds like my kind of dream store!

At day by day, there is no packaging; all 450 products are sold loose. You must bring your own containers or use the ones “graciously provided by other clients,” according to the website. This helps both the planet and one’s wallet, since we often pay for fancy excessive packaging without even realizing it. Bigorgne told La Voix du Nord that, in some cases, her package-free products are 40 percent cheaper than what you would pay in a conventional store, despite being of higher quality.

You can buy precisely the quantity of food that you want. “If you need only a single spoonful of coffee or two cinnamon sticks, I’ll sell it to you,” Bigorgne says. The idea is to reduce the amount of food waste that gets thrown away by selling exactly what a person will use. (An estimated 24 percent of calories produced globally are wasted, and that number is much higher in the U.S.)

This is not a new concept; it’s the way that many of our grandparents shopped. They would take a jar to the corner store to have it filled with however much of a particular ingredient they needed or could afford. While we enjoy a much greater selection of food than previous generations did, it is unfortunate that we’ve moved so far away from the bulk shopping model and the acceptance of reusable containers in stores.

Bert Guevara's insight:

New options in consumer behavior patterns make far better sense in finding sustainable solutions to the waste problem. The banning of plastic has not made a dent in our garbage volume. The latest MMDA data shows a 20% increase in Metro Manila landfill waste volume. We must be attacking the problem the wrong way.

"Stores like day by day show that the trend may be changing. Hopefully North America will take a lesson from Europe’s more forward-thinking grocery models and start realizing that there is another way to shop that doesn’t involve vast quantities of plastic packaging waste."

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How to Reduce the Toxic Impact of Your Ex-Smartphone ("mind boggling stats worth the recycle effort")

How to Reduce the Toxic Impact of Your Ex-Smartphone ("mind boggling stats worth the recycle effort") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
If Americans recycled the 130 million cellphones thrown away every year, enough energy to power 24,000 homes could be saved

With so many new smartphones and electronics being purchased, are users disposing of their older devices properly? According to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data, approximately 2,440,000 tons of electronics, such as computers, mobile devices and televisions, were disposed of in 2010. Twenty-seven percent, or 649,000 tons, of that “e-waste” was recycled. Because some materials in electronics, such as lead, nickel, cadmium and mercury, could pose risks to human health or the environment, the EPA “strongly supports” keeping used electronics out of landfills.

“Recycling electronic equipment isn’t quite as easy as leaving it in a bin in your front yard, as we've learned to do with paper and plastics, but the health and environmental benefits of recycling e-scrap are tremendous,” said EPA Region 5 Administrator Mary A. Gade. “Also, we know that half of the devices thrown away still work.”

If Americans recycled the approximately 130 million cell phones that are disposed of annually, enough energy would be saved to power more than 24,000 homes in a year. If we went ahead and recycled one million laptops, too, we would save the energy equivalent to the electricity used by 3,657 U.S. homes in a year. Furthermore, for every million cell phones we recycle, 35,274 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered. Recovering these valuable metals through recycling precludes the need for mining and processing that much new material from the Earth, thus not only conserving natural resources but preventing air and water pollution as well.

Bert Guevara's insight:

While the e-waste problem is still manageable, new solutions should be put in place. With no imperative or incentive to manufacturers or dealers, the problem keeps mounting yearly.

"To fix the problem, Purves said the state should require manufacturers of electronic equipment to accept an unlimited amount of material to be recycled.

"In addition, he argued existing e-waste recycling companies need to be paid reasonable compensation for trying to dispose of the materials properly.

"Ultimately, legislation may be need to correct the problem, according to some."

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Why are cities picking up the tab for recycling? ("commercial responsibility lacking in waste disposal")

Why are cities picking up the tab for recycling? ("commercial responsibility lacking in waste disposal") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Sarah Laskow writes an important article on recycling and producer responsibility, a subject dear to TreeHugger's heart.

Recycling makes you feel good about buying disposable packaging and sorting it into neat little piles so that you can then pay your city or town to take away and ship across the country so somebody can melt it and downcycle it into a bench if you are lucky. But only a little more than a quarter of that waste makes it that far, because the economics aren't there and many towns find it cheaper to just dump it in a hole in the ground.

Now Sarah Laskow picks up the banner with her post at Next City, asking Who Will Pay America’s $1.5 Billion Recycling Bill? with the subhead that we have been asking for years, Why Are Cities Picking Up the Tab on Corporate America’s Waste?

Laskow notes that disposable packaging makes up a big chunk of municipal solid waste. Fifty years ago this barely existed; people paid a deposit on bottles and took them back, where they were refilled. People ate in restaurants, not cars, and used china plates that were washed and reused. However manufacturers managed to convince us all that it is our responsibility to pick this stuff up and pay for its disposal or recycling. There is talk of change:

Industry clearly isn't interested in EPR and doesn't want to talk about it but it is really the only way to do it. We all drink BPA laden canned beer now because the big brewers wanted to centralize production and they couldn't do that shipping heavy empty glass bottles around the country. The whole system of distribution works now on it all being one way, with the consumer responsible for the garbage. Laskow quotes Samantha McBride on how they changed the language and the thinking:

In the ’80s, some container and paper companies began supporting curbside recycling “to keep the costs of negative externalities squarely on the public.” Industry representatives were often quite explicit about this position. In a 1993 article about recycling, for instance, a representative of the American Plastics Council told the New York Times, “If I buy a product, I’m the polluter … I should be responsible for the disposal of the package.”

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

This scenario is the same in the Philippines -- LGUs spend tax money for waste collection, transport and disposal of commercial packaging waste. Is there a way for the companies who make the profits to share in the expense of recycling?

"I am not sure that this is entirely true. When there is true producer responsibility, companies act in their own best interest like Dell and BMW did, to design things so that it is easier and cheaper to deal with the waste. When Herman Miller took on producer responsibility for their Aeron chairs, they redesigned it so that they could take it apart in minutes and reuse many of the components. Because the companies selling beer in Canada take the bottles back and refill them, they design them to be a bit heavier and stronger to survive an average of 37 cycles of sale, return, wash, refill, sale. They save a fortune."

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ALERT! California Water Aquifers Injected with Waste 2500 Times - YouTube ("this is atrocious!")

http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Following the news that California allowed oil companies to inject waste into federally protected underground aquifers, s...

Following the news that California allowed oil companies to inject waste into federally protected underground aquifers, state regulators are offering a new set of rules to govern the way water is safeguarded in the future.
According to a report by the Associated Press, state officials permitted oil and gas companies to dispose of waste and other fluids into aquifers containing drinking and irrigation water more than 2,500 times. Significantly, 46 percent of these permits were authorized within the last four years – the same timeframe during which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) warned California that regulators were not sufficiently protecting underground water reserves in the drought-stricken state.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This shouldn't happen anywhere in the planet. Aquifers are owned by the people as part of nature's heritage. It will be atrocious to discover that oil companies were allowed to use it as their septic tank.

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The 7 Best Compost Bins for Organic Gardening in 2015 ("you will be running out of excuses")

The 7 Best Compost Bins for Organic Gardening in 2015 ("you will be running out of excuses") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Here are 7 great, simple compost bins to start using your ‘waste’ to create your own nutrient-rich ‘black-gold’ soil to add to your gardens.

If you’ve been yearning to start composting – this is the year to do it! Composting mimics nature’s recycling plan, only it does so on super-warp speed when done right. A compost pile starts out as a diverse pile of “waste.” The easiest compost systems are simply left alone to decompose into rich, sweet-smelling garden amendment, while others require a little elbow grease.

Two important ingredients to any composting system are aeration and moisture. Sometimes heat can make sure that you get a composted soil that is rich with beneficial fungi, beneficial bacteria, and earthworms, as well as the enzymes and acids these life-forms release as they multiply. These soil nutrients can turn a half-dead garden plot into a Garden of Eden bursting with bumper crops.

Not only does adding organic composted soil to your garden help its water-retaining capacity, it also helps to build the immune system of your plants – making your favorite trees, vegetables, flowers, and fruit better able to respond to the challenges presented by a thriving ecosystem – including pesky insects and diseases.

It also removes trash that the municipal collection agencies would normally have to retrieve, and which would go to waste. Yard trimmings, such as leaves, grass clippings, garden debris, and brush, make up over 20% of a typical household’s solid waste.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Here are 7 great compost bins that are easy to set up today to start using your ‘waste’ to create your own nutrient-rich ‘black-gold’ soil to add to your gardens:

1.  Vermicomposting

2.  Japanese Bokashi Composting

3.  Rot-resistant Cedar & Chicken Wire

4. Grass-Clippings, Fall Leaves, and Wood Chip Composting

5. The Three Bin System

6.  Open Wire Compost Bin

7.  Lazy Man's Composting

 

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Unilever, P&G Join Closed Loop Fund to Boost Recycling - Triple Pundit (blog) ("a matter of incentives")

Unilever, P&G Join Closed Loop Fund to Boost Recycling - Triple Pundit (blog) ("a matter of incentives") | Zero Waste World | Scoop.it
Unilever and P&G have joined the Closed Loop Fund, a multi-stakeholder program that seeks to invest up to $100 million in recycling programs.

Recycling has become a multi-billion dollar industry in the United States, with some estimates suggesting it could even be worth as much as $80 billion this year. Nevertheless, many communities in the U.S. still do not offer recycling with their municipal waste collection. Even though cities such as Los Angeles have seen a net financial benefit — gaining revenues from selling off recyclable materials instead of paying to send them to landfill — cities are losing money from not launching recycling programs.

Of course, as with the launch of any business or initiative, seed money is needed. And despite the improving economy, many municipalities cannot or will not invest in the launch of the program. Recently Unilever and Procter & Gamble joined a program that seeks to address the growing challenges of waste diversion.

Both consumer packaged goods companies are now aligned with the Closed Loop Fund, a multi-stakeholder program that seeks to invest up to $100 million in recycling programs.

Companies that have joined this initiative so far include Walmart, Coca-Cola, Kuerig, Johnson & Johnson, PepsiCo and Goldman Sachs — a list that will impress you, or cause your eyes to roll upward, depending on how sincere you believe this project is. Staffed and advised by a crew of executives and advisors from academia, nonprofits, governments and the private sector, the Close Loop Fund insists it “can drive transformational change through partnership” in order to boost recycling rates across the country.

Bert Guevara's insight:

I have always believed in "incentivized" recovery of waste. This program in the U.S. can be replicated locally, with industries partnering with the right private recyclers.

"... Taking a stand on extended producer responsibility would help these companies achieve such targets — but these companies would rather pin the responsibility on consumers, retailers and municipalities. The offer of financing for recycling programs is a far more cost-effective strategy for these companies. $100 million may seem a lot, but it could evaporate quickly if many cities show interest. Time will tell if this will really make a difference or if it is just a well-orchestrated PR stunt full of “multifaceted” investments “in innovative programs.”

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