Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff
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Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff
Pull behind motorcycle trailers are an easy way to pull what you want, when you want.
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Over 100 of the Coolest Pinstriping Designs you have ever seen

Over 100 of the Coolest Pinstriping Designs you have ever seen | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Laying down the line, striping, or just scribbling – whatever you want to call it – it’s an art and a skill. Like any skill, you can get better over time with lots and lots of practice. But if you want to lay down lines as cool as these, you better get started now. Categories: …
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Motocross Helmets

Motocross Helmets | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Whether you are an expert rider or a newbie, you should wear an off road helmet if you want to get out of second gear. You really do need it to protect yourself and your skull. Not all states have helmet requirements while on the road, and there are even less off-road requirements. There are …
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Best Women's Motorcycle Blogs

Best Women's Motorcycle Blogs | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Let us introduce to you a few of the most prominent riders in the world who also happen to be bloggers – and our favorite ones. These women are all bikers and motorcyclists at heart, and happen to do a little blogging about it too. These ladies all seem to have their unique and different ideologies …
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Top 10 Motorcycles for Women by the Numbers

Top 10 Motorcycles for Women by the Numbers | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Today, one in ten motorcycle riders are women. Yet, the different models and makes available on the market largely fail to fulfil the demands of this consumer group. For example, seat heights are rarely suitable. For guys, seat height is something which warrants little concern, but for female riders, it tends to be a top …
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10 Best Motorcycle Roads in America

10 Best Motorcycle Roads in America | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
While a nice, mountainous view is nice on a family vacation, or a snowy trail may exciting to those from the south, when it comes to riding a motorcycle, we tend to look for something different. Clear traffic, gentle twists and turns as well as lots of open space is all you need in a …
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Hookup that Motorcycle Camper Trailer - It's time to go camping!

Hookup that Motorcycle Camper Trailer - It's time to go camping! | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it

Yes, it's time! Before you hookup and rush out the door; let's review 10 tips you need to read before hooking up that motorcycle camper trailer of yours. Don't worry, they are good and you will thank me later.1- Start Out Modestly

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16 Coolest Motorcycle Helmets of 2015

16 Coolest Motorcycle Helmets of 2015 | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Let’s get right into it, 2015 has had some sweet motorcycle helmets hit the market and here are my Top 16 Coolest Helmets of 2015. 16. Crystal Motorcycle Helmet Designs More Crystal Helmet Designs. 15. Football Motorcycle Helmets – Airbrushed More football motorcycle helmets. 14. Lightmode Helmets More Lightmode helmets.  13. Biltwell Gringo ** More …
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16 Incredible Roads you need to ride on before you’re too old

16 Incredible Roads you need to ride on before you’re too old | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
1. Rohtang Pass — Himachal Pradesh, India
Rohtang Pass — Himachal Pradesh, India

“Rohtang Pass is closed half a year and each season road crews use GPS to find the road and dig it out again. However, massive and deadly landslides continue, giving the pass its name, which translates to ground of corpses.” —Via Quora2. Great Ocean Road — Victoria, Australia


Great Ocean Road — Victoria, Australia

The Great Ocean Road was built by returned soldiers between 1919 and 1932 and is dedicated to those killed during World War I, making the road the world’s largest war memorial. The road passes by many famous natural landmarks, including the famous limestone formations known as the “Twelve Apostles.”3. Beartooth Highway — Montana and Wyoming


Beartooth Highway — Montana and Wyoming

Beartooth Highway is the stretch of U.S. Highway 212 that connects Red Lodge, Mont., and Cooke City, Mont., passing along the Montana-Wyoming border. Due to heavy snowfall, the pass is usually open each year only from mid-May through mid-October.

4. Atlantic Ocean Road — Averøy, Norway

Atlantic Ocean Road — Averøy, Norway

The route was originally proposed as a railway line in the early 20th century. The land was later adopted for public road use in the 1970s, and construction began in 1983.5. Hana Highway — Maui, Hawaii


Hana Highway — Maui, Hawaii

The Hana Highway is a 68-mile (109 km) stretch of road that connects Kahului with the town of Hana in east Maui. For those who stay the course, at the end of the Hana Highway is the Oheo Gulch, also known as the “Seven Sacred Pools.”

6. Highway 99 “Sea to Sky Highway” — British Columbia, Canada
Highway 99 "Sea to Sky Highway" — British Columbia, Canada

Highway 99 is originally named after the old U.S. Route 99, which ran from the U.S.- Mexican border in Calexico, Calif., to the U.S.- Canadian border in Blaine, Wash.


7. Los Caracoles “Snails Pass” — In the Andes between Argentina and Chile

Los Caracoles "Snails Pass" — In the Andes between Argentina and Chile

This road acts as the main transportation route between Santiago, Chile, and Mendoza, Argentina. Due to its elevation, it’s covered with a light layer of snow or ice for the majority of the year.
8. Øresund Bridge — Denmark and Sweden

Øresund Bridge — Denmark and Sweden


“The Oresund Bridge is the world’s longest single bridge carrying both road and railway traffic. The connection starts on the Denmark side near the airport as an underwater tunnel that emerges on a man-made island.” —Via NASA9. Going-to-the-Sun Road — Glacier National Park, Montana

Going-to-the-Sun Road — Glacier National Park, Montana

Going-to-the-Sun Road is the only road to pass through Glacier National Park winding through Logan Pass. Every year it’s one of the most difficult roads to snow plow, as the roads can be covered with up to 80 feet (24 m) of snow each winter.10. Guoliang Tunnel — Taihang Mountains, China

Guoliang Tunnel — Taihang Mountains, China


Built to connect the small village of Guoliang with the rest of the world, this tunnel was built by 13 villagers over a five-year period. The villagers took it upon themselves to build the passage after the Chinese government refused to build a multimillion-dollar road that would be used by approximately only 300 people. —Via Amusing Planet11. White Rim Road — Canyonlands National Park, Utah

White Rim Road — Canyonlands National Park, Utah


White Rim Road winds over 100 miles through Canyonlands National Park in Utah. Only mountain bikes, four-wheel drive vehicles, and street-legal dirt bikes are allowed on the road. A trip through the entire route takes approximately three to four days, and a permit is required for overnight trips. —Via NPS12. Transfăgărășan Road — Sibiu, Romania


The Transfăgărășan is the second-highest paved road in Romania and was built between 1970 and 1974 in response to the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia by the Soviet Union. Romanian leaders wanted to ensure their military would have quick access through the mountains should a similar invasion transpire in Romania.13. Highway 101 and Pacific Coast Highway — California Coast
Highway 101 and Pacific Coast Highway — California Coast

Historic Highway 101 stretches from the California-Oregon state line down into the heart of Los Angeles. Following the California coastline for a majority of its route, Highway 101 has become a world-famous road-tripping route due to its excellent views and generally spectacular weather. Pacific Coast Highway aka PCH or CA State Route 1 follows Highway 101 concurrently down the coast and meets for a 54-mile stretch through Santa Barbara and Ventura County.

14. Yungas Road — La Paz, Bolivia

Yungas Road — La Paz, Bolivia


The Yungas Road in Bolivia is also known as “Death Road” or the “Road of Fate” and is one of the most dangerous drives in the world. The 38-mile road reaches elevations of up to 15,000 feet, with some sections as narrow as 10 feet wide. And to add to the insanity, there is not a single guardrail along the entire road. —Via Smarter Travel15. Stelvio Pass — Eastern Alps, Italy

Stelvio Pass — Eastern Alps, Italy

Stelvio Pass is the second-highest paved mountain pass in the Eastern Alps — at 9,045 feet (2,757 m) — after the Col de l’Iseran. Just above the pass is the “Three Languages Peak,” which earned its name because it is the location where the Italian, German, and Romansh languages meet.

16. Millau Viaduct — Millau-Creissels, France

Millau Viaduct — Millau-Creissels, France


The construction of the Millau Viaduct began in 2001 and cost about €400 million to complete. With one mast’s summit at 1,125 feet (343 meters) above the base of the structure, the Millau Viaduct is the tallest bridge in the world.
Photo Credits: Flicker, Shutterstock, wikipedia.org
Now that you can pack that motorcycle trailer like a pro - you can ride all the beautiful roads of the world.
Ride Safe!
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Fall Motorcycle Riding Tips

Fall Motorcycle Riding Tips | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Fall is one of the best times of year for a truly spectacular motorcycle tour. As the air becomes crisper and the landscape turns from greens to varying shades of reds, oranges and golds, vacationing traffic lightens up a bit and the entire world beckons for the motorcyclist to come out and explore. Image Credit : AmericaRidesMaps.comFall riding tours are best experienced when both rider and bike are thoroughly prepared. Not every ride needs to be complete with a map and detailed itinerary for travel but it is best to take certain precautions and be ready for whatever may be encountered during the ride. Following these five essential guidelines will help to ensure a safe and enjoyable motorcycle ride.1. Pay close attention to the weather.Autumn is a time of more than changing colors. The weather fluctuates quickly and often. It's important to check the weather forecast daily for both the current location and the future destinations of the day. If storms, either rain or snow, are predicted for the day, being aware of them could save the rider a lot of trouble and risk. While the cooler air of the fall season can be enjoyable to ride in, the evenings can get quite cold, even down to freezing temperatures in some areas. While motorcycle camping is a great economical choice in the summer, it can become increasingly unsafe when the colder nights of autumn come on. Chilly evenings also mean frost and possible icy patches. When riding at night be aware of shaded areas on the road which will develop frost before the open, lit areas. When traveling early in the morning, remember that those areas shaded in the morning will be the last to warm or thaw.2. Be mindful of wardrobe choices.The fall is a great time to throw on that leather jacket for a ride. A quality leather jacket can not only keep in body heat, it can also block against wind and lighter rain. However, autumn temperatures can be very unpredictable. While the early mornings and late nights can run very cool, the midday temperatures, when the sun is high, can still be quite warm. If you are pulling your trailer and packing it right, you'll have the room. It is important, especially on overnight trips, to bring along many clothing options and to layer clothing while on the road. Wearing a t-shirt under the sweater and the leather that is necessary during the chilly mornings can save a rider from feeling heat-stroked later in the day when the sun begins to beat down on the road. Some riders enjoy the added comfort of wired, self-heating clothing and gear, such as heated hand grips or even heated seats.3. Remember that leaves are more than pretty.Leaves can be extremely hazardous to a motorcyclist. A rider who plows through a pile of leaves at full speed runs a number of risks in that action. A pile of dry leaves will catch wind very easily, flying all around and creating a potential visibility hazard for the rider or for any driver who may be following behind the rider. Piles can also hide many other hazards like a large rock, a tree limb or even a patch of ice. If a rider were to unknowingly ride through a hazard-hiding pile at full speed, they run a high risk of injury. Wet leaves, on the other hand, can be equally as perilous. Wet leaves are slick and slippery, creating the risk of the rider sliding out.4. Watch for wildlife.It's always a treat, when on a long ride, to see deer grazing in open fields or other wild animals in their natural habitat. Still, during the later seasons of the year animals of all types are doing a lot of moving around in preparation for the long, freezing nights of winter. It is important to watch closely for any type of wildlife that could pose a threat, especially during the hours around dawn and dusk. Birds are likely to be traveling south for the winter. While this is usually not to concerning, as they typically fly above the road, it is still something to keep it mind while on the road. When traveling through an area that is a native habitat for specific animals, such as the thick wooded areas where deer and turkey most often live, take it slow and stay alert. Animals often move quickly enough to get in the way of a rider but not quickly enough to then get out of the way as well.5. Be sure your ride is tip top.Some riders take out the same bike all summer long. By the time autumn is brimming, that bike has seen some miles. Giving the bike a little extra maintenance attention before a fall ride could be the difference between a cool, smooth adventure and a touring nightmare. Be sure the tire tread isn't to worn, fluids are filled and that all parts are in good, working condition. For many riders, the fall ride may be the final ride of the year before packing the bike away for the winter. Knowing this, many motorcycle owners will choose to do a minimal inspection of their bike before a fall ride rather than spending time and money taking it in to a shop. However, let's say that you read 50 TIPS FOR MOTORCYCLING ACROSS THE USA - that final ride is going to be a long one so it may be advisable to have a pro do a thorough inspection and tune-up for the sake of safety and preparedness.Autumn is a great time for an easy-going riding adventure. Hitting the roads with no detailed plan or route in mind can lead to seeing awesome sights, finding new places, meeting extraordinary people and creating grand stories to tell in future years. And yet, if the rider is not well prepared and very savvy when taking their grand adventure, the tour could turn out to be tumultuous or even dangerous. It is just as important to stay safe and healthy on a ride as it is to have a great time. Slow down, relax, see the sights and enjoy the ride. 10 MORE GREAT TIPS FOR YOUR NEXT MOTORCYCLE TRIP - EVEN IF YOU DON'T PULL YOUR TRAILER ALONG.
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50 Tips for motorcycling across the USA

50 Tips for motorcycling across the USA | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Motorcycling across the USA can give you the experiences that will create lifetime memories. When you take a little time before your trip to prepare, you'll find fewer pitfalls and have a great time.Here are some tips to make your trip more enjoyable.#1 Make up your mind to do it and stop putting it off. A dream trip like this can slip away as the years pass by. Find a time when you can get away from other responsibilities and commit to the trip.#2 Allow yourself plenty of time to see the things that interest you. A two to three week minimum is required to maximize the time you have, but not feel rushed.#3 Plan your trip. Begin by choosing a starting point. For example, if you want to see the USA from coast to coast, but you're in the midwest, you can choose any city you want and fly there, have your bike shipped, or use a reputable dealer and rent one. #4 Find the best routes for your trip. This includes finding roads that are in line with your riding ability. If you're an expert rider, there won't be too many that you'll want to avoid. If you are not comfortable with windy mountain roads, this is a point you will want to take into heavy consideration.#5 Get online and map out your sleeping accommodations. Even if you plan to rough it part of the way, there is nothing better than a hot shower when you've been on the road for a while. If you're on a budget, you may want to consider some of the nicer budget motels such as Best Western, Motel 6 and so forth.#6 Check the customer ratings on any hotels to make sure you don't end up in a seedy dump in a bad part of town. This is particularly important if you're new to the area and not familiar with the best places to stay overnight.#7 Pack all of the necessary gear that you will need for both comfort and for safety. You don't want to get hundreds of miles from home and realize you've left behind a necessity.#8 Take a set of earplugs along to preserve your hearing. The roar of the motor for several hours a day can take its toll on your hearing.#9 Leave your itinerary with a trusted friend or family member. Include a time for periodic check ins so they will know if you get into trouble, and approximately where you are supposed to be at.#10 Plan on spending more time off of the interstates and on roads that will connect with with more of the local people. You'll see more interesting scenery and enjoy the view more.#11 Plan stays in towns where you'll have the opportunity to see new sights and meet interesting people.#12 Give yourself plenty of time to take in the scenery and relax while you're in places you truly enjoy being. Life is short and it's all about experiencing it and living it whenever possible.#13 If you ride with others, make sure you're of compatible personalities. It's a real drag to be on the road with a person that makes the trip miserable.#14 Get plenty of pictures and videos while on your trip. You'll want something to remind you of the special moments you'll have on your journey. #15 Make sure to start your trip at an interesting place and end at one that is just as intriguing for you. Don't end your trip at a family member's house, unless you really want to see them and would enjoy doing so. This is about personal freedom, not conforming to the expectations of other people.#16 Have weather band radio so you'll know if bad weather is coming. Particularly important when riding through tornado country.#17 Wake up early and enjoy the sight of the newly waking world. You'll be amazed at what you see when you have no other distractions.#18 Eat a light breakfast and take light snacks with you. Heavy breakfasts can make you sleepy and this is not a good situation when you're riding down the roads on a bike.#19 Eat your heaviest meal at night and go to bed by 10:00 p.m. This will help you to wake up energized and ready to meet another fresh, new and exciting day.#20 Keep yourself focused when driving. Accidents are caused by distractions and drowsiness. The best way to avoid them is to keep your mind clear while driving and concentrate on being safe on the road.Remind yourself of why you're on this trip.#21 Don't take any unnecessary chances. Stay safe while riding and if you have people who are riding with you who are not practicing good safety, part company. It's better to be safe than sorry when you're covering a lot of highway miles in a single day.#22 Plan to cover a reasonable amount of miles in one day. This means don't push yourself too hard to reach a certain destination. Give yourself plenty of time when you're planning out your trip.#23 Allow for down time when planning your trip. You never know when you may have mechanical problems, inclement weather or may not be feeling up to par on a certain day. Allow some slack time in your itinerary so you can better enjoy the trip as a whole.#24 Don't consume any alcohol until your bike is parked for the rest of the day. Wait until your head is clear in the morning before you resume your trip.#25 Take all of your valuables in with you when you've parked your bike for the day. This can help to prevent loss from theft.#26 Take along a reliable way to communicate for check in times. Generally a cell phone will do. There are some places that will have poor reception so you may have to use a pay phone to check in with the folks back home.#27 Take along something to write a journal on. If you're by yourself you may have thoughts that you want to get down on paper and look back on later. This is a great way to detail important parts of your trip and read them later.#28 Take rain gear so you'll be prepared if there is unexpected precipitation. You'll want to be prepared for any kind of weather.#29 Have some good reading with you. You'll have down time when you just want to relax. This is the perfect time to get into a book that you've been wanting to read.#30 Don't forget your favorite tunes. Music makes the world go round and you'll be glad that you have it when you're on the road for long periods of time. It helps to make the time pass more comfortably when the view isn't all that great.#31 Be mindful of your thoughts and your attitudes. When you're out for an extended period of time, you may start to get the blues, or to think about negative things. This isn't the time for unhappiness. You're out to have the time of your life, so keep negative thoughts in check. Remind yourself of why you're on this trip.#32 Take along a GPS system so you'll know where you're at all of the time. This will help to prevent you from getting lost, even if you take a wrong turn or decide to check out an area that is off the beaten path.#33 Make a realistic budget for your trip. You'll want to have enough money available to spend to do all of the things you would enjoy. Consider fuel, food, lodging, event fees and personal supplies.#34 If you're on medications, make sure that you have a large enough supply to last your trip.#35 Plan for extra time in areas that are of special interest to you. You can always make adjustments in your schedule as you go. You don't want to plan things so tight that you are in a rush to get from one place to another.#36 Take time to smell the roses. Let yourself get caught up in special moments. It could be a beautiful sunrise, a sunset, or seeing wildlife at one of your stops. Life is short so enjoy it to the fullest.#37 Don't forget your personal grooming items. After being on the road and getting a hot shower, you may want to go out for the evening. Its better to be able to look your best and choose not to, than to not have that option.#38 Prepare your bike before the trip. Change the oil and make sure its in top mechanical condition#39 Pack a first aid kit. You never know when you might need it on the open road#40 Take along sleeping gear. Even if you're planning to stay in hotel rooms throughout the trip, you never know when you might have an emergency and need to camp out for the night.#41 Keep snack items on hand. This is so you'll always have the ability to stay hydrated and fed. You might not get to a place where you can purchase food and drinks when you had planned to.#42 Have a backup source of getting money. In the event you are robbed, it's a good idea to have access to an alternate source of funds, such as a credit card or bank account.#43 Take along sunscreen. You may need to have protection from UV rays if you will be exposed to excess amounts of sunlight - you have plenty of room in your pull behind motorcycle trailer if you are hauling one.#44 Take along enough different clothing for any kind of weather. This is in addition to the regular riding gear you will take. You may want to have a pair of light shoes for evening relaxation.#45 Make a list a few days before you pack for your trip. Check it over the day before your trip. Take off any unnecessary items and add any that you have forgotten. This is the best way to make sure you have everything you'll need.#46 Pack the night before your trip. This will give you time to figure out what item needs to go where, so you'll be fresh and ready to go the next day. #47 It is also recommended that after you pack, that you unpack and take a quarter of the unnecessary items out so you won't be taking more than you need with you.#48 Get a good night's sleep the night before you leave. You'll want to be fresh and alert when you start out on your trip.#49 Make sure that your riding gear is all in good working order.#50 Have the time of your life. This is a dream come true for many riders who just sit and talk about the trip they're going to take one day. You're actually doing it, so more power to you.Should you need to hit the highways on your adventure across the USA, here are a few of the most interesting highways to see in route. Most interesting highways across the USA
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Welcome to the USA Trailer Store!

Welcome to the USA Trailer Store! | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it

You are in the right place for pull behind motorcycle trailers and other trailer accessories for bikers. I’m really excited to start sharing my years of experience trailering, tips and trips to go on with your trailer, and even a few accidents and how to avoid them." 

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Badass Motorcycle Helmets

Badass Motorcycle Helmets | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Looking for a badass motorcycle helmet? Look no more. Motorcycle helmets are not required by law in all states, which gives you some very cool options.
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Top 10 Modern Cafe Racers

Top 10 Modern Cafe Racers | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Cafe racers are considered to be an odd phenomenon. More than just aesthetics, they are great for presenting a clean and beautiful paradigm shift for the future of engineering. In fact, this field is limited only in the imagination of the most powerful dreamers today. Inspiring endless media and dedicated websites, the Cafe racer market …
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Top 10 Classic Motorcycle Helmets and Modern Innovations

Top 10 Classic Motorcycle Helmets and Modern Innovations | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Have a look at these classic motorcycle helmets and compare them with the one you are using. As a biker, knowing just how long a brand has been producing the products you use is great, but seeing the development of those safety products over time is another. Great companies listen to the users of their …
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Motorcycle Helmet Headphones

Motorcycle Helmet Headphones | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
What’s cooler than riding your motorcycle with your headphones on cranked up to your favorite track while riding? Wearing a pair of headphones beneath a motorcycle helmet previously seemed impractical, but now it’s a reality. How is this possible? It’s really not that complicated. There are several varieties of headphones for installation in a motorcycle helmet …
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10 Most Expensive Motorcycles in the World

10 Most Expensive Motorcycles in the World | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Motorcycles and heavy bikes have long held a fascination for men all over the world. The thrill and excitement of riding one of these powerful motors makes the most luxurious and expensive motorcycles all the more appealing, and the desire to own one of these top vehicles as a symbol of their own individual identity …
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Cold Weather Motorcycle Helmets

Cold Weather Motorcycle Helmets | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
It’s cold outside! What do you do when you are a biker in the winter time in Michigan? (besides mope and pout), well you dream about what it can be like next year right? Get out the calendar and plan that first long trip, the first one that takes you down new roads and new …
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How to back up when you are pulling a trailer with your motorcyle

How to back up when you are pulling a trailer with your motorcyle | Motorcycle Helmets, Trailers- and other biker stuff | Scoop.it
Pulling a trailer with your motorcycle can be a lot of fun, and it can be a problem in some places. For example, when a group of us bikers decided it was time to break for breakfast - I sensed I would encounter a problem. Many motorcycles usually pack the Eagles Nest restaurant - as it is known as a "Sunday breakfast spot." So already, parking would be a problem. At first I thought things would go just fine—I just had to ride the bike down to an empty spot and park in. But the problem was there were no empty spots to accommodate parking with a pull behind motorcycle trailer. And when I reached at the end of the lane, I was blocked. I figured out I just had to pull a U-turn and head out the way I came. Still it didn’t work. This wasn't the first time I was riding with trailer in tow behind my motorcycle. But it was the first time stopping at a crowded bar where bikes park literally anywhere. I had trouble backing up the lane to the exit and even turning around. So I started to have second thoughts that I shouldn't have brought the trailer along. Riding a motorcycle is an enjoyment because of the maneuverability. But bringing the pull behind motorcycle trailer had somehow stressed me up.Finally, I managed to park the motorcycle in the center of the lane, locked me and my wife’s helmets in the trailer and went in to have some breakfast.When leaving the restaurant, the crowd of motorcycles at the parking lot had reduced, providing me with enough room to turn the bike and trailer around (with a little push from the mrs.) I learned that next time it is better to check the packing situation a little closer before pulling in to park.I road that setup with around for seven days, in over sixteen hundred miles in seven states, through all road conditions—mud, gravel, dry, and rain, and on city streets, winding roads, country lanes and flat four lanes. Halfway through the trip I realized it is better to practice riding with a pull behind motorcycle trailer before embarking on that kind of journey with it.Practice makes perfect and everyone I asked about pulling a motorcycle trailer admitted the same; you won’t even be conscious of it. But since this was my first time riding with the motorcycle trailer; I pulled up to the wrong pump at our first gas stop so had to back up again. In another instance I nearly forgot that it wasn’t there until my wife reminded me that it was there. I've travelled with the trailer traversing all conditions. Initially, I thought I would feel an increase in lateral force in the corners from the trailer that causes the bike to want to drift off line, but I was wrong as it didn’t happen this way. In fact the bike leaned and cornered as if the ol' pull behind wasn’t there.I've since set my back view mirrors to see the movement of the trailer, glancing at the mirror occasionally to see the trailer behavior when I hit a bump or a rough section of the road. Although the trailer bounced occasionally, I never felt it. Even on rough gravel roads, I never felt the trailer motion. And in slow speed, handling of my bike was not affected. Fuel consumption decreased by just two miles a gallon.Importance of Riding with a Pull Behind Motorcycle TrailerOne big obvious importance is you can carry whatever you want and feel like. My wife carried along more toiletries for the week trip than we’ve used in our whole life. Nobody likes packing and unpacking with a motorcycle, but with a trailer, you will love packing - you just pull into a motel, grab your bags and check in. The following day, you just throw your bags in the trailer and you’re ready to go.The trailer was a real convenience on the road as I could easily access accessories like rain gear, jackets, gloves, maps, and snacks. And the ice chest on the trailer came in handy as it held our favorite drinks for whenever and wherever we wanted them. Our road visibility increased and other drivers could easily gauge our speed as our overall motorcycle length increased.Things to Keep In MindMotorcycle trailers offer plenty of benefits especially when touring more than one person. But there are a few things you should keep in mind. One, the trailer adds to the length and weight of the motorcycle, affecting braking and acceleration. Length affects movement in tight quarters. You require special care when turning beside an obstacle; like a post, stopped vehicle or curb. When braking, you need to do it a little earlier than you’re used to and you need a little more throttle and clutch when starting out. You also need to park strategically.However, none of these considerations outweigh the benefits of riding with a pull behind motorcycle trailer. Therefore, don’t avoid a motorcycle trailer because they take a little getting used to pulling. Riding your biker without one took some time to learn now didn't it? After a few hundred miles you won’t even feel it is there.
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