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Too Busy? 7 Ways To Increase Leisure Time, According To Science

Too Busy? 7 Ways To Increase Leisure Time, According To Science | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Feeling overwhelmed? Are you constantly running from thing to thing but never getting it all done?


When researchers survey people, they say they’re too busy — about everything.

 

Too busy to make friends, date, sleep, have sex, to go on vacation… or  to even have lunch.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

If you think you are too busy - take a minute to read this article.  Some great advice. 

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 21, 2014 2:45 AM

Where did free time go? Here's the science behind why we feel so busy and how to get those leisure hours back so you can relax.

Arslan Chaudhary's curator insight, April 22, 2014 6:49 AM

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The Tyranny of Toxic Managers: An Emotional Intelligence Approach to Dealing with Difficult Personalities

The Tyranny of Toxic Managers: An  Emotional Intelligence Approach to Dealing with Difficult Personalities | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Toxic managers are a fact of life. Some managers are toxic most of the time; most managers are toxic some of the time. Knowing how to deal with people who are rigid, aggressive, self-centered or exhibit other types of dysfunctional behaviour can improve your own health and that of others in the workplace. This author describes the mechanisms for coping.

 

Toxic managers dot the landscape in most organizations, making them seem, at times, like war zones. These managers can complicate your work, drain your energy, compromise your sanity, derail your projects and destroy your career. Your ability to deal with these corporate land mines will have a significant impact on your career. Those who are able to recognize toxic managers quickly and understand what makes them tick will be in the best position to protect themselves. Difficult managers are a fact of life and how they affect your life depends upon the skills you develop to deal with them.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

Every organisation has toxic managers - some thoughts on how to deal with them.

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nathalie job's curator insight, April 14, 2014 11:11 PM

Are you a toxic manager? Do you known one? Understand your personnality and have sincere feed=back from your team is important to identify such toxic elements. With individual feedbacks as well as team leadership survey, we can easily identify, and train people in conflict management...

Maribel Young's curator insight, April 15, 2014 11:32 AM

Article is a bit long, but tables give a quick summary.  Bottom line, developing your emotional intelligence is the best way of dealing with toxic managers.

Marlon Saville, CAP's curator insight, August 18, 2014 12:13 PM

If this is your or a coworkers experience read and share.  You may help relieve stress and improve or build an office relationship!

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The Simple Thing That Makes the Happiest People in the World So Happy

The Simple Thing That Makes the Happiest People in the World So Happy | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Research has found about 9 zillion things you can do to increase happiness. Of course, you’re probably not doing any of them.


So you want to start? You want something insanely easy to do that research has demonstrated over and over again works.

To be fair, most people don’t really do much to deliberately make their lives happier.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

An article to savour.

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 13, 2014 4:37 PM

What's the simple thing that most people naturally do in the world to make them so happy?

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Lead at your best | McKinsey & Company

Lead at your best | McKinsey & Company | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Five simple exercises can help you recognize, and start to shift, the mind-sets that limit your potential as a leader. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


Via Annette Swann
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Annette Swann's curator insight, April 4, 2014 4:26 PM
Lead well and live well. The article captures the key concepts on what we deliver in our Fit to Lead programs to executives and their teams. www.wellnessforte.com.au
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Why Incentives Don't Actually Motivate People to Do Better Work

Why Incentives Don't Actually Motivate People to Do Better Work | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

You would think that rewarding people for being good at their jobs would make them better at them. 

 

But social science shows that it doesn't, for a number of reasons. 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Roger Francis
Graeme Reid's insight:

Research has been available for many years that monetary incentives are not (except in limited circumstances) the most important motivating factor for people.  So why do most organisations continue to use bonuses etc as there main way to motivate their people?  

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 3, 2014 7:13 AM

(KEY QUOTE) "Motivation is much less about external prodding or stimulation," management sage Clay Christensen explains, "and much more about what's inside of you and inside of your work." 

 

In other words, the most motivated people aren't the best paid, but those who feel a connection with their work. 

John Michel's curator insight, April 18, 2014 2:05 AM

Rather than structuring our workdays (and our employees' workdays) around rewards, we should instead structure them around continual, meaningful progress. 

Mike Masin's comment, April 18, 2014 6:26 AM
Things that are harder to quantify like growing and being challenged are our long-term motivators. So we know ourselves better than anybody else.
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Change Leader, Change Thyself

Change Leader, Change Thyself | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

 

Tolstoy’s dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we’ve become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change. Simply put, change efforts often falter because individuals overlook the need to make fundamental changes in themselves.

 

Building self-understanding and then translating it into an organizational context is easier said than done, and getting started is often the hardest part. We hope this article helps leaders who are ready to try and will intrigue those curious to learn more.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

Great article from McKinsey on organisational change and the need for greater self awareness.

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 31, 2014 3:32 PM

Anyone who pulls the organization in new directions must look inward as well as outward.

Nadene Canning's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:16 AM

Self-understanding ... feel, think, act, observe, listen, reflect, question 

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The Worst Mistake America's CEOs Make

The Worst Mistake America's CEOs Make | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Too many leaders stink at asking the right questions. Make sure you're not one of them.

Via Anne Leong
Graeme Reid's insight:

Questioning and listening to the answers are such important skills.

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John Michel's curator insight, March 29, 2014 12:27 PM

Countless breakthroughs, innovations and businesses have started from a single out-of-the-box question.

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Try This One Phrase to Make Feedback 40% More Effective

Try This One Phrase to Make Feedback 40% More Effective | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Employees deserve feedback. So we give it--sometimes with great results, sometimes not so much.

But there's one phrase you can use that will instantly improve the impact of the feedback you give--whether the actual feedback is positive or negative.

The following comes from Daniel Coyle, author of The Talent Code (one of the few books I actually give to friends) and The Little Book of Talent (a book I've written about before) and ablog about performance improvement that belongs on your must-read list.


Via David Hain
Graeme Reid's insight:

It is also important to make any feedback about how to improve not a perceived failings.

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Tracee Orman's curator insight, March 30, 2014 9:58 AM

Writing this one phrase on students' papers boosted student performance by 40%. So simple...

Elizabeth Bowden's curator insight, April 2, 2014 10:01 AM

"

I'm giving you these comments because I have very high expectations and I know that you can reach them.

That's it: just 19 words. But those words are powerful because they are not really feedback. They're a signal that creates something more powerful: a sense of belonging and connection.

Looking closer, the phrase contains several distinct signals:

1)    You are part of this group.

2)    This group is special; we have higher standards here.

3)    I believe you can reach those standards."

U-M Human Resource Development's curator insight, April 11, 2014 4:04 PM

Everyday leaders can achieve extraordinary results by being attentive! Great article!

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Why Getting Comfortable With Discomfort Is Crucial To Success

Why Getting Comfortable With Discomfort Is Crucial To Success | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
In an increasingly competitive, cautious and accelerated world, those who are willing to take risks, step out of their comfort zone and into the discomfort of uncertainty will be those who will reap the biggest rewards. When I first left my parents’ small farm at eighteen to move to “the city” [...]

Via Anne Leong
Graeme Reid's insight:

Taking risks is all part of developing.  Staying in your comfort zone will never lead to new opportunities. 

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, March 28, 2014 7:24 AM

Great scoop by Anne Leong via via @anne_leong.  As a work with a number of clients and continue my own journey through this process, I find the questions listed extremely helpful!


Again and again, we have to decide:

  • Do I keep doing what’s always been done, or challenge old assumptions ad try new approaches to problems?
  • Do I proactively seek new challenges or just manage those I already have?
  • Do I risk being exposed and vulnerable, or act to protect my pride and patch of power?  
  • Do I ask for what I really want, or just for what I think others want to give me?
  • Do I ‘toot my horn’ to ensure others know what I’m capable of, or just hope my efforts will be noticed?
  • Do I speak my mind or bite my lip, lest I ruffle feathers or subject myself to criticism?
Brian Kirby's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:07 AM

Wow, those questions were not exactly "fun" to answer (especially rapidly and honestly). However, I have always been told that "If your dreams don't scare you, then they aren't big enough". This is something that I have lived my life by for quite some time now, and it definitely appears to be more than true... "If you are always comfortable, then you are never growing." It's worth some discomfort/fear in order to grow and reach goals! Thoughts? How tempting is it to stay under the umbrella of comfort? Is it worth it?

Brian Kirby's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:08 AM

Wow, those questions were not exactly "fun" to answer (especially rapidly and honestly). However, I have always been told that "If your dreams don't scare you, then they aren't big enough". This is something that I have lived my life by for quite some time now, and it definitely appears to be more than true... "If you are always comfortable, then you are never growing." It's worth some discomfort/fear in order to grow and reach goals! Thoughts? How tempting is it to stay under the umbrella of comfort? Is it worth it?

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Find the Coaching in Criticism

Find the Coaching in Criticism | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

You may think that there are a thousand ways in which feedback can push your buttons, but in fact there are only three, say these two negotiation teachers from Harvard Law School. Feedback -- whether justified or not -- is hard to judge impartially when it doesn’t square with what you think is true, when you don’t trust the person providing it, or when it threatens your basic sense of yourself. ....


Via Patricia Clason, Bob Cowper, Amy Melendez, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Graeme Reid's insight:

Receiving feedback is never easy, but here are some tips to handle it more constructively.

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Patricia Clason's curator insight, February 9, 2014 10:39 AM

Targeted toward how to receive feedback as valuable coaching, this is a VERY GOOD article for both giver and receiver. Take the time to read it!

Patricia Clason's curator insight, February 9, 2014 10:42 AM

These tips for receiving feedback can be so valuable for anyone who is sensitive to criticism - and those who are carrying emotional wounds, like PTSD, can be hyper-sensitive. 

Amy Melendez's curator insight, March 11, 2014 4:04 PM

From the article: "Your growth depends on your ability to pull value from criticism in spite of your natural responses and on your willingness to seek out even more advice and coaching from bosses, peers, and subordinates. They may be good or bad at providing it, or they may have little time for it—but you are the most important factor in your own development. If you’re determined to learn from whatever feedback you get, no one can stop you."

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10 Steps To Effective Listening

10 Steps To Effective Listening | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

In today’s high-tech, high-speed, high-stress world, communication is more important then ever, yet we seem to devote less and less time to really listening to one another. Genuine listening has become a rare gift—the gift of time. It helps build relationships, solve problems, ensure understanding, resolve conflicts, and improve accuracy. At work, effective listening means fewer errors and less wasted time. At home, it helps develop resourceful, self-reliant kids who can solve their own problems. Listening builds friendships and careers. It saves money and marriages.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

Most people may regard listening as easy, but to listen fully takes attention and concentration.  It is a skill that we all need to work on.

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Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 9, 2014 9:18 PM

Greta quote in the cartoon. "nobody hates a listener"

Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 9, 2014 9:19 PM

Great caption in cartoon "Nobody hates a listener"

Stefano Principato's curator insight, April 25, 2014 6:13 AM
  1. Face the speaker and maintain eye contact.
  2. Be attentive, but relaxed.
  3. Keep an open mind.
  4. Listen to the words and try to picture what the speaker is saying.
  5. Don’t interrupt and don’t impose your “solutions.
  6. Wait for the speaker to pause to ask clarifying questions.
  7. Ask questions only to ensure understanding.
  8. Try to feel what the speaker is feeling.
  9. Give the speaker regular feedback.
  10. Pay attention to what isn’t said—to nonverbal cues.









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Netflix's Major HR Innovation: Treating Humans Like People

Doing the common sense thing and treating people like adults are at the heart of Netflix's breakthrough HR policy. McCord believes that most companies fall into a trap of having 97% of their employees doing great work and not needing HR to hold their hands, while 3% of employees absorb HR's time, money, and energy. Netflix's approach: they simply don't hire those people.


Via David Hain
Graeme Reid's insight:

 I love this approach, although I can already hear the many excuses why such an approach would not work in our industry.  If you treat people with a complete lack of trust don't be surprised at the behaviour that generates.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:08 PM

Great deck from Netflix founder on how to develop a high performance culture

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The Irresistible Power of Storytelling as a Strategic Business Tool

The Irresistible Power of Storytelling as a Strategic Business Tool | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

"It’s not often that you hear Budweiser and Shakespeare mentioned in the same breath. But according to new research from Johns Hopkins University, the Bard’s deft application of storytelling techniques featured prominently in the beer company’s Super Bowl commercial."


Via Gregg Morris
Graeme Reid's insight:

So true.  As the article points out - Data can persuade people, but it doesn’t inspire them to act; to do that, you need to wrap your vision in a story that fires the imagination and stirs the soul.

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Culture Eats Strategy For Breakfast

Culture Eats Strategy For Breakfast | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Culture eats strategy for breakfast, technology for lunch, and products for dinner, and soon thereafter everything else too.Why? Because company culture, a concept pioneered by Edgar Schein, is the operationalizing of an organization’s values. Culture guides employee decisions about both technical business decisions and how they interact with others. Good culture creates an internal coherence in actions taken by a very diverse group of employees.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Graeme Reid's insight:

If you get the culture right everything else falls into place.

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Anne-Laure Delpech's curator insight, May 23, 2014 2:19 AM

J'aime beaucoup ces propos :

"“You can’t complain here,” Tamara explained. “If you see something wrong, you must fix it. We say it is a great opportunity to come up with a solution, and this is where many of our best programs have come from. Anything can be changed. We aren’t victim to anyone. We own the culture.”"

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, June 11, 2014 1:23 AM

Culture matters and it matters immensely!

Tobias Beckwith's curator insight, July 14, 2014 11:27 AM

This seems to be a theme for my day... this is the third place I"ve encountered the idea, and it's not even 9am yet. When we seek to create change in the world, all too often we ignore the most powerful thing working against us - the culture in which we're working. So how can you work with that? Make your change "fit" the culture? Find ways to change the culture itself?

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What Gets in the Way of Listening

What Gets in the Way of Listening | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Your inner critic could be to blame. ("What Gets in the Way of Listening" http://t.co/IsQZxDcOi6 #leadership)
Graeme Reid's insight:

Active listening is one of the toughest skills to master.  We often think we are listening, but the other person is not feeling heard. 

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What The Happiest People Know About Work

What The Happiest People Know About Work | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Study, work hard, and you will be successful.

 

This was the mantra repeated by educators throughout my youth. None of them added "be happy" to the success equation.

 

But a growing body of research in positive psychology and neuroscience is demonstrating that happiness is the secret ingredient to success. It turns out, our brains are more engaged, creative, productive, and resilient when in a positive state.

 

All this unhappiness comes with a high price tag to businesses, costing more than $550 billion a year in lost productivity. In his book, Donovan identifies 60 simple steps individuals can take to improve their happiness and get back on the path to success. Here are six of the top things happy workers do:

 


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

If you don't enjoy what you do it is very difficult to be successful.  There are ways to re-frame the way that you look at things to help you focus on what is important to you.

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Jill Miller, SPHR's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:23 AM

The secret sauce for success? Finding happiness in our work -- even simple things -- makes a difference.

Denise Gabbard's curator insight, April 10, 2014 1:19 PM

Doing what you love can make you happy-- finding a way to make money while doing what you love is even better! 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 22, 2014 11:01 PM

Avoiding energy sappers is what led me to retire from teaching. It was not the students and parents. It was the bureaucratic and technocratic nonsense that went on in school which passes itself off as education.

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Why Leaders need to ask Empowering Questions?

Why Leaders need to ask Empowering Questions? | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Peter Drucker, considered the leadership guru of the twentieth notes that, “The leader of the past may have been a person who knew how to tell, but certainly the leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.”


Via donhornsby
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Peter Ø. Christensen's curator insight, March 31, 2014 3:28 AM

A kind of coaching approach to leadership which cope great with the non-hierarchic company structure, which the greatest employeers and top minds of the future demands.

 

Efficienarta's curator insight, March 31, 2014 6:00 AM

One of the more rewarding periods of my business career included a leadership meeting weber of CEO adjourned discussion of a topic because the team were not asking questions ............. When we discussed the topic at the following meeting we had a lively debate both initially in a  "seek to understand" phase and then later in what amounted to brainstorming of potential solutions.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:45 AM

Absolutely a valid assumption for the 21st century leader.

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Leadership and authenticity: Being the 'real you' at work

Leadership and authenticity: Being the 'real you' at work | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Leaders who are seen as authentic inspire the most loyalty, but what does being ‘authentic’ really mean? Pepi Sappal explores this complex and often misunderstood area of leadership, and looks at how to balance personality with professionalism


Via Roger Francis
Graeme Reid's insight:

Authenticity starts with self awareness.  And self awareness is about understanding how you react and how your behaviour can affect others.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:39 AM

Useful exploration of a critical positive leadership characteristic.

John Michel's curator insight, April 2, 2014 7:58 AM

There are many definitions within management and business literature of authentic leadership but, as a rule, authentic leaders tend to be genuine, transparent and trustworthy, display a strong moral code and can be counted on to keep their word.

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Don’t Tell Me You Don’t Have Time

Don’t Tell Me You Don’t Have Time | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Effective time management is constantly making effective decisions to direct your time toward the activities that are most important in hitting your goals, never say you don't have time.

Via Barb Jemmott
Graeme Reid's insight:

I completely agree - saying that you don't have time is the worst excuse.

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Brian Kirby's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:11 AM

Really a simple concept, yet rarely given much thought. Love the comparison that Bill Gates has the same 24 hours in a given day as the Garbage Man, or even ourselves for that matter... War has been declared on the phrase "I don't have time." This may be what is said, however "I don't have time for YOU" is what the listener (boss, colleague, friends), 

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Traditional Leadership Hierarchies Are Dead, Or Should Be

Traditional Leadership Hierarchies Are Dead, Or Should Be | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Growth and innovation doesn't necessarily come from the people with lofty titles, but from the people who develop new ideas and execute them on a daily basis. And that's why, increasingly, traditional hierarchies don't work--and neither do traditional promotion and recognition systems.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Graeme Reid's insight:

Interesting article.  It does not propose that hierarchies should not exist or are bad for the organisation, but that the traditional hierarchies based on tenure rather than merit should be challenges  I especially like the comment - listen to your employees to determine the real leaders.

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Lessons From Lincoln: 5 Leadership Tips History And Science Agree On - TIME

Lessons From Lincoln: 5 Leadership Tips History And Science Agree On - TIME | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Lessons From Lincoln: 5 Leadership Tips History And Science Agree On
TIME
Into Thin Air · It's Mary Barra's GM Now. What made him such an extraordinary leader? And does modern research back up his methods?

Via Mike Klintworth
Graeme Reid's insight:

Some great lessons  from a great man.

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John Michel's curator insight, March 26, 2014 12:14 PM

If you’re a leader as Lincoln was, you need to know what studies show inspires team morale. And the answer is great stories:

daniel peled's curator insight, April 12, 2014 10:09 AM

טיפים למנהיגות מצליחה, כאלה שכולם מסכימים להם

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:52 PM

Basic reminders on leadership traits that stand the test of time.

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Is Hierarchy Helping Or Harming Your Organization?

Is Hierarchy Helping Or Harming Your Organization? | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Hailed as the anti-hierarchy, holacracy is the new business buzzword. Developed by Ternary Software CEO Brian Robertson in 2007, at its most basic holacracy is a self-governing operating system where everyone within an organization takes responsibility for delivering on the company’s purpose. With roles arranged in circles rather than layers, [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kevin Watson
Graeme Reid's insight:

Interesting article. Hierarchies are not all bad and they provide people with some structure.

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John Michel's curator insight, March 20, 2014 1:52 PM

While disposing of job titles and other trappings of hierarchy promotes feelings of equality, it’s important that that equality is framed in a structured way. Whether holacracy or hierarchy, organizations that can strike a balance between transparent collaboration and structured order will ensure that their employees feel empowered and in control.

David Hain's curator insight, March 24, 2014 4:46 AM

Holacracy is helping Zappos.

Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 24, 2014 3:39 PM

At the minimum organization structure is about roles and relationships. Whether flat or heirarchical,  individuals in the structure must understand the purpose of their role and how it interacts with other roles. Beyond having a clear focus and direction for activity, they need autonomy and authority to do what is necessary for the role, the competencies required for the role, and the means to develop new competencies, processes and procedures as organization's circumstances change. 

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How You Start Your Day Matters

How You Start Your Day Matters | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

They say the first thing you do every day when you sit down at your desk matter because it sets the whole tone of your day. Who are 'they'? ‘They’ means productivity experts, freelancers, consultants and other workers who need to make each minute count. Among a lot of people, it's considered a bit of common wisdom.


Via Barb Jemmott
Graeme Reid's insight:

Or ""Don't Start Your Day by Checking Email"" - very good advice.

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Why Good Managers Are So Rare

Why Good Managers Are So Rare | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
Gallup data shows they have a combination of hard-to-teach traits. (Performance variability lies within human nature itself.

Via Mike Klintworth
Graeme Reid's insight:

Far too often people who are doing well in a technical role are promoted into a management position with no thought as to whether they have the necessary skills.

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Mike Klintworth's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:50 AM

For too long, companies have wasted time, energy, and resources hiring the wrong managers and then attempting to train them to be who they’re not. Nothing fixes the wrong pick.

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So Much Potential, So Little Investment: Why Great Talent Languishes

So Much Potential, So Little Investment: Why Great Talent Languishes | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it
If talent is so important, why aren't more companies investing in leadership development?

Via David Hain
Graeme Reid's insight:

And why do so many leadership development  programmes fail to meet their objectives?  Many reasons including poorly set objectives, but the major reason is lack of monitoring and follow though.  But there is a different more successful solution - see http://www.corporatecoachingnetwork.com.au/

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David Hain's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:49 AM

From a survey - seems leadership development is really important conceptually, but other things are more important to invest in.