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The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning | Motivation | Scoop.it
The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

 

Giving teachers and students as much autonomy as possible in choosing their own curricular material is another way that we can improve student engagement.

 

Only students who are intrinsically motivated to be engaged in school will end up truly challenged, enriched, energized and ultimately fulfilled by their experience. Yes it’s an ideal, but it’s worth keeping in mind.

 


Via Gust MEES
Jason Beal's insight:

Many students are not motivated in the right way. if asked, they would say they go to school because everyone else does. It is also less effective for a student to say they have to do well to get on to the next level o their education. Giving more grades than feedback can turn"marks" into currency. Extrinisic motivation doesn't get students truly involved in their learning.Only initrinsically motivated students can truly be challenged in school.

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Sharrock's comment, May 1, 8:54 AM
You should take a look at this link: http://www.maccoby.com/Articles/4Rs_Of_Motivation.shtml. Maccoby states there is a mix of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards: "mix of four Rs: Responsibilities, Relationships, Rewards, Reasons". Maccoby's paragraph on responsibilities focuses on the intrinsics--"People are motivated when their responsibilities are meaningful and engage their abilities and values." Meaning is something personal, ie intrinsic. He also discussed personal challenges when he said, "Craftsmen are motivated by the challenge to produce high–quality products." I liken this to an artist's aesthetics for creating art.
In his section on "Relationships", I wonder if the quality of a relationship is an extrinsic reward/acknowledgement or intrinsic or a mixture of both.
In the part about "Rewards", he does the most exploration of extrinsic rewards, namely about "pay", but he also states, "However, Jönsson finds that 80–85 percent of people who receive recognition for a job well done are satisfied even if it is not monetary, compared to 45–50 percent of those who are not recognized for their work." Which is along the lines of what I was saying about acknowledgements. They are more highly valued, but still extrinsic.
Finally, in his section "Reasons", Maccoby notes, "Jönsson reports that Chinese workers are especially motivated because they have a sense that they work not only for themselves, but also for their country. They feel proud of being part of a winning team that is building a powerful economy. According to Jönsson, in China more than in the West, workers are interested in and aware of their company’s vision, and they see their own work in this larger context." This again is mixing intrinsics and extrinsics.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 8:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 8:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.
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Emotions, Survival, and Disconnection

Emotions, Survival, and Disconnection | Motivation | Scoop.it
Our emotions can both help us and disconnect us.
Jason Beal's insight:

All of our negative emotions can help us in survival. These motivated the body and brain to deal with risky situations. Surviva-mode states work against homeostasis so we do not feel physically and emotionally safe. This is apposed to the positive emotions and feelings when we are in homeostasis. When faced with a fear the whole body will become rigid  and put into survival mode.

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Motivation: The Why’s of Behavior

Motivation: The Why’s of Behavior | Motivation | Scoop.it
From instincts to self-actualization: What’s motivates us?
Jason Beal's insight:

Psychology is filled with many different theories and explanations for motivations. 1: Instinct theory: This theory states that people do things because of a predetermined set of biological code. 2: Drive-reduction theory: People's drives must be reduced in order to achieve the desired state of homeostasis. 3: arousal theory: people look to increase their level of arousal, not decrease it. People have an ptimum level of arousal that is just right for them. 4: incentive theory: There are forces that propel us to do things that we normally would not do. 5: Cognitive theory: Our expectations guide our behavior. There are two types of motivation, intrinsic and extrinsic. 6: Self-determination theory: you can have a combinatio of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in your work. 7: self-actualization theory: We are most motivted to realize our own inner potential.

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e-learning: Intrinsic Motivation Learning Design

e-learning: Intrinsic Motivation Learning Design | Motivation | Scoop.it
Jason Beal's insight:

High levels of learning can lead to greater amounts of intrinsic motvation. In return, more intrinsic motivation leads to a higher desire for learning. The effects of traditional incentives are declining so it makes sense to go towards intrinsic incentives. Having real-world problems may contribute to intrinsic motivation. Assessment is used as an extrinisic motivator with the motivation being not failing.

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Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation - P2P Foundation

Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation - P2P Foundation | Motivation | Scoop.it
Jason Beal's insight:

Intrinsic motivation is when something is being done for one's own gain. Extrinsic motivation is when someone does something because they are being forced or for an external reason. It is argued that extrinsic motivation doesn't work because if the only reason a task is being done is for an award that will make the task altogether less enjoyable. As soon as the award or punishment is withdrawn the activity stops. Bigger rewards are required over time to maintain the same results.Some things that help promote intrinsic motivation are the ability to challenge yourself, having a choice of what you do, being able to work with others, and getting positive recognition for your work.

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Got Curiosity?

Got Curiosity? | Motivation | Scoop.it
The drive that everyone is talking about
Jason Beal's insight:

All people are born with instincts that are also called drives. These urges can be unignorable. There is a death instinct called thanatos and a life instinct called eros. It has recently been suggested that there is a third curiosity drive. It has been called the epistemophilic instinct. This is what causes us to send multi-million dollar rovers into space. Alll humans want to know and we can't help ourselves.

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How to Get People to Do Stuff

How to Get People to Do Stuff | Motivation | Scoop.it
The 7 Basic Drivers of Motivation
Jason Beal's insight:

Understanding the ways that people are motivated through their needs can allow you to more easily manipulate them. People have a need to belong, so giving people a group identity can make them more influenceable. Many of the things people do is out of habit without even thinking about it. If you anchor into an old habit, a new one can be created in less than a week.Everyone has self-personas of who they are. If you get them to take one small action against that, you can use the foot-in-the-door phenomenon to get them to change their behavior. All people have unconscious instincts that influence their behavior, for example, people are more motivated by fear, and all people desire to be in control.

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The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning | Motivation | Scoop.it
The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

 

Giving teachers and students as much autonomy as possible in choosing their own curricular material is another way that we can improve student engagement.

 

Only students who are intrinsically motivated to be engaged in school will end up truly challenged, enriched, energized and ultimately fulfilled by their experience. Yes it’s an ideal, but it’s worth keeping in mind.

 


Via Gust MEES
Jason Beal's insight:

Many students are not motivated in the right way. if asked, they would say they go to school because everyone else does. It is also less effective for a student to say they have to do well to get on to the next level o their education. Giving more grades than feedback can turn"marks" into currency. Extrinisic motivation doesn't get students truly involved in their learning.Only initrinsically motivated students can truly be challenged in school.

more...
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 8:54 AM
You should take a look at this link: http://www.maccoby.com/Articles/4Rs_Of_Motivation.shtml. Maccoby states there is a mix of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards: "mix of four Rs: Responsibilities, Relationships, Rewards, Reasons". Maccoby's paragraph on responsibilities focuses on the intrinsics--"People are motivated when their responsibilities are meaningful and engage their abilities and values." Meaning is something personal, ie intrinsic. He also discussed personal challenges when he said, "Craftsmen are motivated by the challenge to produce high–quality products." I liken this to an artist's aesthetics for creating art.
In his section on "Relationships", I wonder if the quality of a relationship is an extrinsic reward/acknowledgement or intrinsic or a mixture of both.
In the part about "Rewards", he does the most exploration of extrinsic rewards, namely about "pay", but he also states, "However, Jönsson finds that 80–85 percent of people who receive recognition for a job well done are satisfied even if it is not monetary, compared to 45–50 percent of those who are not recognized for their work." Which is along the lines of what I was saying about acknowledgements. They are more highly valued, but still extrinsic.
Finally, in his section "Reasons", Maccoby notes, "Jönsson reports that Chinese workers are especially motivated because they have a sense that they work not only for themselves, but also for their country. They feel proud of being part of a winning team that is building a powerful economy. According to Jönsson, in China more than in the West, workers are interested in and aware of their company’s vision, and they see their own work in this larger context." This again is mixing intrinsics and extrinsics.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 8:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 8:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.