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Rescooped by Jordan Pappas from Music Business - What's Up?
onto Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope.
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The Top 1% of Artists Earn 77% of Recorded Music Income, Study Finds... - Digital Music News

The Top 1% of Artists Earn 77% of Recorded Music Income, Study Finds... - Digital Music News | Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope. | Scoop.it

  

Whatever money is left in recordings, you’re probably not making it.  That’s the harsh conclusion offered by Mark Mulligan of MIDiA Consulting, whose data shows a more extreme imbalance towards superstar artists than previously thought.  ”The music industry is a ‘superstar economy,’ that is to say a very small share of the total artists and works account for a disproportionately large share of all revenues,” Mulligan noted.

“This is not a Pareto’s Law type 80/20 distribution but something much more dramatic: the top 1% account for 77% of all artist recorded music income.”

In other words, the exact opposite of the Long Tail, a theory that seemed exciting at the time but has now been thoroughly disproven (MIDiA’s report is titled The Death of the Long Tail: The Superstar Music Economy).  Because instead of embracing choice, consumers have actually been completely overloaded by it.  The result, according to Mulligan, is a ‘tyranny of choice‘ that makes consumers less likely to explore, and more likely to glom around mainstream artists.

 

 


Via Catherine Hol
Jordan Pappas's insight:

This is completely outrageous! 77% of total revenue came from the 1% of "Superstar" artists that make millions. With that in mind, the other 99% of artists made up for 23% of revenue. Sounds to me like some of the cause of the problem is from Record Labels. 

 
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How Optimistic Are You About The Future Of The Music Business ...

How Optimistic Are You About The Future Of The Music Business ... | Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope. | Scoop.it
At the same time the same technology has created challenges such as online piracy, and even online music streaming services offer a small return for the average music maker. In a couple of weeks Avid will be unveiling their ...
Jordan Pappas's insight:

You'd be surprised by the percentage of people who actually think about this.

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Music exec looking to boost industry - Leader-Telegram

Music exec looking to boost industry - Leader-Telegram | Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope. | Scoop.it
Music exec looking to boost industry
Leader-Telegram
Skeptics question whether anyone can reverse the decline of an industry that has seen global sales plummet from $28 billion in 1999 to $16.5 billion in 2012.
Jordan Pappas's insight:

This scoop is pretty self explanatory with its description. Chairman Lucian Grainge, is determined to reinvent the way we listen to music and fix the decreasing profit of overall music being sold and heard. If this man were to find a way, all musicians would be making more money than they are now. Lets say it went from $17 billion to $35 billion in 10 years, everyone would be profiting.

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Rescooped by Jordan Pappas from Music Business - What's Up?
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The Top 1% of Artists Earn 77% of Recorded Music Income, Study Finds... - Digital Music News

The Top 1% of Artists Earn 77% of Recorded Music Income, Study Finds... - Digital Music News | Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope. | Scoop.it

  

Whatever money is left in recordings, you’re probably not making it.  That’s the harsh conclusion offered by Mark Mulligan of MIDiA Consulting, whose data shows a more extreme imbalance towards superstar artists than previously thought.  ”The music industry is a ‘superstar economy,’ that is to say a very small share of the total artists and works account for a disproportionately large share of all revenues,” Mulligan noted.

“This is not a Pareto’s Law type 80/20 distribution but something much more dramatic: the top 1% account for 77% of all artist recorded music income.”

In other words, the exact opposite of the Long Tail, a theory that seemed exciting at the time but has now been thoroughly disproven (MIDiA’s report is titled The Death of the Long Tail: The Superstar Music Economy).  Because instead of embracing choice, consumers have actually been completely overloaded by it.  The result, according to Mulligan, is a ‘tyranny of choice‘ that makes consumers less likely to explore, and more likely to glom around mainstream artists.

 

 


Via Catherine Hol
Jordan Pappas's insight:

This is completely outrageous! 77% of total revenue came from the 1% of "Superstar" artists that make millions. With that in mind, the other 99% of artists made up for 23% of revenue. Sounds to me like some of the cause of the problem is from Record Labels. 

 
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Taylor Swift Is the Music Industry's Number-One Money Maker

Taylor Swift Is the Music Industry's Number-One Money Maker | Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope. | Scoop.it
Sometimes you hear that the music industry is dying, that no one's buying records anymore and there are no true rock stars left. But according to a new list put together by the folks at Billboard, 24-year-old Taylor Swift raked in ...
Jordan Pappas's insight:

The reason why I am using this scoop is because, she made almost over $40 million dollars in 2013. Thats insane! Not talking smack on Taylor Swift but, she wouldn't have made that much if it weren't for the label, the royalties, the merchandise, and the  expensive tours. I mean congratulations for her getting where she is but thats not the point. Some artists don't even make enough money for food for a few days. They could be the most talented musician in the world. No one would ever know. 

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The Most Important Problem The Music Business Must Solve

The Most Important Problem The Music Business Must Solve | Musicians Aren't Getting Paid Enough, The Industry is Failing and People Are Losing Hope. | Scoop.it
By David Sherbow (@MusicBizGuy) of My Life With Music. What is the greatest problem which the new music business must solve to maintain it relevance in the future?

Via Jérôme Rastoldo
Jordan Pappas's insight:

This particular scoop talks about how some musicians' are making more money digitally, but less musicians are actually profiting period.

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Brandon Mezanazi's curator insight, July 20, 5:44 PM

I have figured out that the big labels for streaming music are no help to musicians who are trying to be discovered and to get a good income.

Brandon Mezanazi's curator insight, July 20, 6:30 PM

I have figured out that the big labels for streaming music are no help to musicians who are trying to be discovered and to get a good income.