Morgan's Midsummer Night's Dream
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Source: "Imagining Shakespeare in Two Recent Film and Televised Adaptations of A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Source: "Imagining Shakespeare in Two Recent Film and Televised Adaptations of A Midsummer Night's Dream" | Morgan's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Morgan Walsh's insight:

This article is very informative as to how the interpretations of Shakespearian plays change with time. The big challenge is to interpret the play in a way that appeals to modern day audiences. The Shakespearian language has to be altered because nowadays, it is incomprehensive. An example of a modern day adaptation of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is a story called "The Fraiman and Bowker Dream. This story can be seen at a themepark called "Dream Land." This theme park has a Shakespearian theme but it also exploits post modern critiques on Shakespeare. None of these interpretations are of the original text but always seem to include Shakespeare in the title.

 

Ford, John R. "Recounting Our Dreams: Imagining Shakespeare in Two Recent Film and Televised Adaptations of A Midsummer Night's Dream." EBSCOhost.com. EBSCO, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2013. <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=34356570&site=ehost-live>.

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Image: Scene From A Midsummer Night's Dream, Titania and Bottom

Image: Scene From A Midsummer Night's Dream, Titania and Bottom | Morgan's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Morgan Walsh's insight:

This is the scene where Titania falls in love with Bottom after he is put under a spell that gives him a donkey head. This image speaks a thousand words. This scene in the play actually makes me feel bad for Bottom because he is being used by Oberon. Titania is under a spell set by Oberon in which she falls in love with the first thing she sees, which happens to be Bottom. When she awakens from the spell, she is horrified and leaves Bottom by himself.

 

Landseer, Edwin H. "Scene From A Midsummer Night's Dream, Titania and Bottom." Wikipaintings, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2013. <http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/edwin-henry-landseer/scene-from-a-midsummer-night-s-dream-titania-and-bottom>.

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Historical Article: "In the Name of the Father: The Elizabethan Response to Recusancy by Married Catholic Women, 1559-1586"

Historical Article: "In the Name of the Father: The Elizabethan Response to Recusancy by Married Catholic Women, 1559-1586" | Morgan's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Morgan Walsh's insight:

This article connects back to Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” because it helps to give an understanding about the Elizabethan era. It particularly talks about women and how little they are involved in society. The article states that if a married woman does something unlawful, it is blamed on the husband. This means that basically, women in the Elizabethan era are, for the most part, their husband’s property. Whenever Shakespeare’s plays were performed, men would always play the women roles. The women nature was simply to bear children and to run the household. It is better understood why the women had no right to be an Elizabethan actress because of their unfortunate culture.

 

 

 Peddle, Karen. "In the Name of the Father: The Elizabethan Response to Recusancy by Married Catholic Women, 1559-1586." Ebscohost.com. N.p., 2007. Web. 3 Feb. 2013. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=7&sid=181c7fd3-61ae-4d60-a37d-599c4c1c033c%40sessionmgr11&hid=9&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=afh&AN=27162598>.

 

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Kendall Jones's comment, March 10, 2013 7:03 PM
Morgan, I really liked how instead of jumping into talking about what your article was about you tried showing the class a visual and then further more explained it and after that tied it into the article! You really had good connections for this!
Olivia Darveau's comment, March 10, 2013 10:01 PM
I agree with Kendall. You added to the article with the image and explained it thoroughly before moving on. Your connections to Shakespeare's world around the time he wrote "A Midsummer Night's Dream" makes it easier to understand the play better.
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Literary Criticism: "A Midsummer Night's Dream and The School of Night: an Intertextual Nexus"

Literary Criticism: "A Midsummer Night's Dream and The School of Night: an Intertextual Nexus" | Morgan's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Morgan Walsh's insight:

This literary criticism written by Maurice Hunt shows how similar Sidney’s "The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia" and Shakespeare’s "A Midsummer Night’s Dream" actually are. In both play writes, specific plot lines, methods of characterization, and literary motifs are repeated. The author of this article’s main point to get across is how similar "The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia" and "A Midsummer Night’s Dream" are; he believes that these two plays are never looked upon close enough. The overall plotline, surviving romantic comedy, plays a major part in both plays. There are many examples that show the similarities between the two. First, both plots start in a forest setting with magical creatures. In "A Midsummer Night’s Dream", the play starts with Puck accidentally putting magic eye drops into the wrong person’s eyes as they sleep in the forest. The beginning conflict in "The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia" starts with a girl named Dametas in search of treasure climbs an oak tree. There she blindfolds herself and made a wish that the deity will grant. Another connection from the text is during "The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia", Gynesia is disgusted of her sexual assignation the previous night. This is similar to how Titania feels after she is released from the spell in the morning to see herself cuddling with Bottom and his donkey head. Both plays end happily with people eloping. I agree with Hunt’s view, I do not think that Shakespeare wrote his plays without incorporating other writers’ work.

 

Hunt, Maurice. "The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia, Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and the School of Night: An Intertextual Nexus." EBSCO, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2013. <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=9702026607&site=ehost-live>.

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Video: Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream

The Warners' unique interpretation of Shakespeare, complete with Batman and Robin.
Morgan Walsh's insight:

This video is a representation of "A Midsummer night's Dream" from a different perspective. It is animated to appeal to a younger audience. It also makes fun of the Elizabethan language by providing an interpreter who does not translate exactly. This video takes what may be a boring topic to some people and makes it commical.

 

Cartoon. Www.google.com/videos. Google, n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbqq77AEN_8&feature=player_detailpage>.

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Morgan Walsh's comment, March 10, 2013 11:07 PM
I agree, at first Shakespeare can be very difficult to understand. This video does help but it's not the only thing. Most of the class had something scooped to connect Shakespeare to real life and privide a better understanding. You should check out Derek's historical article; it tells the best way to teach Shakespeare to students.
Morgan Walsh's comment, March 10, 2013 11:08 PM
*provide
Jack Lanoie's comment, March 10, 2013 11:23 PM
I saw his article while looking at his page, I think that technique could be really successful. The groundling approach we looked at in class was good, but it would take a lot of maturity and self control that can be difficult to get out of some high school classes. I think the way that is described in Derek's article would be highly effective even with high school students.