Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
13.9K views | +5 today
Follow
Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Dean Smith
Scoop.it!

Wearable Camera That Tracks Your Meals Has Started Human Trials

Wearable Camera That Tracks Your Meals Has Started Human Trials | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Do you want to change your eating patterns? Would you like to lose some weight? Do you have an eating disorder? In
Richard Platt's insight:

The device calculates the energy content and mass of the food based on the pictures of the meal and how many times the person chewed and swallowed during a meal. Sazonov said that the number of chews is proportional to ingested mass and energy intake. At the moment the images taken by the camera are analyzed by a nutritionist who identifies the food and then gives an estimate on the size of each portion but that should be automated in the future by a computer doing a 3D analysis of the images.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearables The Promise And Peril For Medtech Companies

Wearables The Promise And Peril For Medtech Companies | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
From smart clothing to wristwatches, wearables that extract biological data are pouring into the digital health domain. Major consumer electronics...
Richard Platt's insight:

These are questions about how to apportion value to devices, raw data, analytics, and behavioral change in support of truly improved health outcomes and lower costs.  Among them:

*  What is the value of consumer-generated biological data, and to whom and when?

*  What are the relevant data points and insights that impact consumer health and should cause a change in behavior? 

*  What is the value of modified consumer behavior that improves health, and who captures that value?

Consumers expect wearable health technologies to be engaging, intelligent, and integrated into their daily activities, just as mobile technologies have helped transform how we socialize, shop, and bank.  Most importantly, these devices’ wearers use the captured data to understand differences and translate those differences into knowledge and actions that improve health. 

Historically, only trained physicians and nurses, with their years of training and rounds of appointments, had the ability to apply perpetual learning in healthcare.  Wearable health solutions, and the learning they provide, collapse the information asymmetry that has existed between the health practitioner and the consumer. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google is launching a new version of Glass, but only for workers

Google is launching a new version of Glass, but only for workers | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google is launching a new version of Glass, but it's for the working world.
Richard Platt's insight:

If everything goes according to plan, Google will have businesses actively using this version of Glass by the fall. You may have to wait much longer for the fabled consumer-friendly device, though. If you ask the WSJ's sources, the mainstream version is "at least" one year off. The one consolation is that it might not be nearly as expensive as the $1,500 Explorer Edition. The enterprise unit is expected to cost "well below" the Explorer's price point, and we can't imagine that a less exacting standard model would sell for more.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The Future For Wearable Growth Will Be In The Workplace

The Future For Wearable Growth Will Be In The Workplace | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The enterprise wearables market may have more demand than that for consumers in the short term.
Richard Platt's insight:

Not really a new point here, that (been saying that for awhile) "Business, not consumers, will grow wearables sector.", what we can say that will work is better definition and execution of NPD (New Product Development) and in particular the Front End of Development, something that we've not seen the academics or the Big Consulting firms be able to effectively wrap their head around.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable tech proves business value hands-free and in field

Wearable tech proves business value hands-free and in field | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technology could make its mark in the enterprise in the near future, with hands-free police and military pilot projects already under way
Richard Platt's insight:

Business applications:  For instance, one European telco is employing smartglasses for fieldwork. The difficulty is that its infrastructure is ageing just as much as its personnel. This means not only that different chunks are under almost constant repair while upgrade work takes place, but also that its workforce is starting to retire, taking their skills and knowledge with them.

Examples:  

*  The telco is therefore starting to send more junior engineers into the field equipped with smartglasses, which display a series of tasks for them to complete in sequence. They can also access a knowledge base and connect to experts in real-time, using the devices if they hit any problems.

*  Another example of current usage is the London Metropolitan Police’s deployment of body cameras that are roughly the size of a cigarette packet. The aim here is to try and rebuild public trust in a force that has been embroiled in controversy following incidents such as the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes as a suspected terroristand the killing of Mark Duggan, which triggered the London riots.  Despite some privacy concerns, a trial with 1,000 officers across 10 London boroughs seems to have shown the value of the cameras in helping to scrutinise police behaviour. The cameras were also helpful in gathering evidence of offences, leading to more early guilty pleas and thereby speeding up the justice process.  As a result, most of the Met’s 20,000 uniformed officers will now be issued with the cameras by March 2016.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from UX-UI-Wearable-Tech for Enhanced Human
Scoop.it!

Under Armour’s connected fitness apps now have 140 million users

Under Armour’s connected fitness apps now have 140 million users | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

CEO Kevin Plank said : “We are growing our community at more than 30 percent year over year and so far in 2015 these users have voluntarily logged over 1 billion workouts and more than 5 billion foods.”


Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

The dashboard Under Armour is building, within UA Record, will focus on four key metrics: sleep, fitness, daily activity, and nutrition.

“We think the consumer needs a dashboard that just says ‘How am I doing?’,” Plank said. “If I can look on my cellphone and I can figure out my bank balance, my stock price, or the weather in any given city — the fact that I have no measure or barometer of my health except for going to see a doctor ever 12, 1,8 or 24 months, we think is really a crime.”  -  Another element to the health dashboard that they are focusing on is defining success for the consumer and providing the user with context.  -  “This isn’t just about knowing that I took 8,000 steps yesterday,” Plank said. “But because I took 8,000 steps, how did it make me feel? And more importantly, how did that work with how I slept or what I ate that day? And we think that having that information is going to allow them to make better decision to live healthier and enriched lives — affecting ultimately, obviously, fitness, but we think there’s an outlook for us to affect global health, which gets us so excited.”

more...
Olivier Janin's curator insight, July 28, 2015 10:42 AM

Comparatively Fitbit sold 11 millions unit last year.

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wafer-thin material heralds future of wearable technology

Wafer-thin material heralds future of wearable technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
UOW's Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM) has successfully pioneered a way to construct a flexible, foldable and lightweight energy storage device that provides the building blocks for next-generation batteries needed to power wearable electronics and implantable medical devices.
Richard Platt's insight:

ISEM PhD student Monirul Islam said. "But the biggest challenge is to charge storage in a small volume as well as being able to deliver that charge quickly on demand."   -  To solve this problem, a team of PhD students, led by Dr Konstantin Konstantinov under the patronage of ISEM Director Professor Shi Xue Dou and with the support of Professor Hua Kun Liu, the head of ISEM Energy Storage Division, have developed a three-dimensional structure using a flat-pack self-assembly of three components: graphene, a conductive polymer and carbon nanotubes, which are atom-thick lattice-like networks of carbon formed into cylinders.  


The so-called wonder material graphene, made from single atom-thick layers of graphite, was a suitable candidate due its electronic performance and mechanical strength.  Dr Konstantinov said. "If we could efficiently separate the layers of carbon we could then use both surfaces of each layer for charge accumulation. The problem we faced was that fabricating these 3D shapes in practice, not just theory, is a challenging, if not impossible task."


The solution was to flat-pack the components by building the 3D shape layer-by-layer, much like a miniature exercise in cake decoration. The graphene in liquid form was mixed with the conductive polymer and reduced to solid and the carbon nanotubes carefully inserted between the graphene layers to form a self-assembled flat-packed, wafer-thin supercapacitor material.

"The real challenge was how to assemble these three components into a single structure with the best use of the space available," PhD student Monirul Islam said. "Getting the proportions or ratios of the components appropriately in order to obtain a composite material with maximum energy storage performance was another challenge."



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

HP Warns The Most Popular Smartwatches Aren't So Secure

HP Warns The Most Popular Smartwatches Aren't So Secure | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
HP has conducted a security study on 10 of the most popular smartwatches and found that all of them are vulnerable to hackers. The company says the findings are 'disappointing, but not surprising.'
Richard Platt's insight:

In HP study, analyzing 10 of the best-selling smartwatches currently available on the market, looking at their security features "from an attacker's perspective." As the company explains, the study takes into account the management capabilities of a smartwatch, as well as network posture and mobile and cloud interfaces, among other things.

"The results of our research were disappointing, but not surprising. We continue to see deficiencies in the areas of authentication and authorization along with insecure connections to cloud and mobile interfaces," HP points out. "Privacy concerns are magnified as more and more personal information is collected (including health information). Issues with the configuration and implementation of SSL/TLS that could weaken data security were also present."  HP notes that it tested the 10 smartwatches for the security features the Open Web Application Security Project recommends and found that only half the smartwatches come with a lock function to prevent unauthorized data access and nine of the watches send unencrypted data. Moreover, a third of the devices allowed unlimited login attempts, which could allow someone to guess the password, and two of the devices allowed for easy pairing with a different phone.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

12 things I don’t like about the Apple Watch

12 things I don’t like about the Apple Watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
All in all the Watch is a great piece of technology, but let's not forget this is Version 1. It will get a lot more interesting with time.
Richard Platt's insight:

Wish I'd seen this list earlier, but it only confirms my own bias about smartwatches, they're a good idea, just not a good business idea for the time being anyway.  Just an opinion sure, but it would seem that the market agrees with me.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Nike and Apple court defeat underlines fitness trackers’ dirty little secret

Nike and Apple court defeat underlines fitness trackers’ dirty little secret | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
We've set a low expectation level for the accuracy of fitness trackers.
Richard Platt's insight:

Bottom Line: Activity trackers are not accurate and thus misrepresent the data presented to users. -  Nike and Apple have agreed to settle in a class action lawsuit alleging that the two sold the Nike FuelBand fitness tracker knowing that the device’s biometrics measurements were inaccurate.  As a result, Nike will pay out $2.4 million in claims to people who bought the FuelBand between January 2012 and June 2015. Apple, which sold the FuelBand in its stores up until March of this year, will pay nothing.

The plaintiffs in the class proved to the court that the calorie burn, steps and overall activity measurements in the device’s “NikeFuel” dashboard were inaccurate, and that Nike and Apple continued marketing the product knowing that.  This is the dirty little secret of fitness trackers in general. Certainly many of them present accurate information, but many do not. All one needs to do is wear several types of trackers for a day and compare the results. They won’t be the same, and may be wildly different.   But the devices have met with very little scrutiny over the data they present.

Trackers often claim to present data like “calorie burn” based on several sensor readings and an algorithm. But they overreach. The reading of an accelerometer can’t possibly gather enough data about the user’s body and activity to claim to measure weight loss or blood pressure, or to make statements about the quality of sleep.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Glass Lives on as a Workplace Wearable

Glass Lives on as a Workplace Wearable | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google Glass, no longer available to consumers, is gaining fans in the workplace.
Richard Platt's insight:

“In the enterprise, Glass is solving a problem, where in the consumer world it’s a luxury,” he says. “In the enterprise people have been trying to solve the hands-free workforce problem for 20 years.”  -  Glass is also finding a number of uses in the medical world. Augmedix, a San Francisco-based startup, uses Glass to let doctors stream visits with patients to remote health consultants who help fill out electronic medical records that doctors would otherwise spend up to a few hours a day working on. Doctors can also utter voice commands to get Augmedix’s software to show patient information like lab results or charts on Glass’s small head-up display.  -  Augmedix CEO and cofounder Ian Shakil says it has “hundreds” of doctors using smart glasses with its software, the “vast majority” of which are using Glass; they pay a monthly fee in the “low single-digit thousands” of dollars for the hardware, software, and technical support.  -  One of Augmedix’s customers, Albuquerque, New Mexico-based ABQ Health Partners, which has 15 doctors using Glass, says it saves doctors about three hours per day that they can use to see more patients and follow up on phone calls and lab results.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearables Won’t Be Truly Useful Until They’re Proactive

Wearables Won’t Be Truly Useful Until They’re Proactive | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
You’d be forgiven for thinking that wearable technology might be a passing fancy. Yes; they have been used to bring
Richard Platt's insight:

Wrist-worn wearables tend to grab the most headlines these days, but progress is also being made on other types of wearables that don’t require such prominent placement on the body. Appropriately, the world of professional athletes is already among the earliest adopters.  Wearable Technology and the NFL:  Last year, it was reported that 17 NFL stadiums had partnered with Zebra Technologies to outfit players with RFID chips in their uniforms. The move was intended to allow better tracking of the players on the field—to provide “deeper stats,” if you will, but that only scratches the surface of what these devices will be capable of in the long term.  The real advantage here lies in being able to better assess how much stress players’ bodies are subjected to during games. In other words, the same technology that can track players’ movements in three dimensions can also give a sense of how athletes’ bodies are moving and performing under duress.  According to Cleveland Browns wide receiver Andrew Hawkins, the benefits are already becoming obvious: “I remember feeling like I was getting pounded in practice, and [the RFID chips] confirmed what I was feeling.” Thanks to the feedback provided by the chips, Hawkins’ training regimen was stepped down appropriately, preventing a potential injury and giving him time to recover.

The National Football League has also partnered with General Electric and even the United States military to explore how wearable technology could help prevent concussions.


To round out our look at proactive wearables, we’ll need to take a look at one of America’s most overworked professions: nursing. Nurses in America tend to work hideously long hours with insufficient pay—a fact that seems to be reported on regularly without any substantive changes in sight. The resulting physical and mental stress can sometimes lead to errors—errors that can result in injury, or worse.

According to a recent survey, it turns out that “nurse fatigue” is a real problem in America’s healthcare industry. More than 27% of survey respondents—healthcare professionals, all of them—admitted that they had made an error at work due to fatigue. Nearly 65% indicated that they had almost made a mistake as a result of fatigue.  Remember the motion tracking software being looked at by the NFL? There’s no reason it couldn’t also be applied to America’s most vulnerable workers. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google Glass 2.0 To Have Foldable, Water-Resistant Design and Intel inside

Google Glass 2.0 To Have Foldable, Water-Resistant Design and Intel inside | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google may give Google Glass a slight design makeover. A new report suggests the next version of the wearable will feature a more rugged frame complete with a foldable design and water-resistance. Oth
Richard Platt's insight:

A new report suggests the next version of the wearable will feature a more rugged frame complete with a foldable design and water-resistance. Other than the rumored design changes, the new Glass won't look much different from the original Explorer Edition. Google Glass's Enterprise Edition keeps a few features the original version had: a stretchy band fitting across the forehead, computer tech in a compartment located on the frame's right side, and a tiny display in front of the right eye. One of the most important things to know about Google Glass for enterprise is that it won't be designed as a stylish accessory. Google created a device to wear in medical centers or factories.  -  "The overall design of the computer side is more robust as well, built to withstand normal drops and bumps that could occur in less-than-ideal workplace environments. Sources have also said that the device is more water resistant, built with fewer places for water and other outside material to seep in." The device also includes improved internals such as 5 GHz support, a better battery, heat management, a larger prism display, and an Intel Corp Atom processor.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

3 out of 4 doctors have used health apps and wearables

3 out of 4 doctors have used health apps and wearables | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It’s hardly news that wearable technology is big business, and as the hyped industry grows, it may even play a role in making us healthier.
Richard Platt's insight:

80% of UK doctors agreed that digital health was here to stay, and according to Ipsos Mori new tools help solve the challenge of ageing populations and limited health budgets.  However, it seems most doctors are still unsure of what role these will play, as seven out of ten doctors say they don’t know exactly what they want from digital health solutions. Most disagreed that new technology could ever replace physical check-ups, but it does seem that it could complement them. More doctors agreed than disagreed that health and lifestyle apps would “form part of” treatment plans in future.

It’s not all rosy, however, as a quarter of doctors are concerned that mobile apps for patients will create more conflicts between doctors and patients. The biggest concern is that patients will misunderstand the information.

more...
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, August 2, 2015 2:48 AM

80% of UK doctors agreed that digital health was here to stay, and according to Ipsos Mori new tools help solve the challenge of ageing populations and limited health budgets.  However, it seems most doctors are still unsure of what role these will play, as seven out of ten doctors say they don’t know exactly what they want from digital health solutions. Most disagreed that new technology could ever replace physical check-ups, but it does seem that it could complement them. More doctors agreed than disagreed that health and lifestyle apps would “form part of” treatment plans in future.

It’s not all rosy, however, as a quarter of doctors are concerned that mobile apps for patients will create more conflicts between doctors and patients. The biggest concern is that patients will misunderstand the information.

Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, August 2, 2015 2:49 AM

80% of UK doctors agreed that digital health was here to stay, and according to Ipsos Mori new tools help solve the challenge of ageing populations and limited health budgets.  However, it seems most doctors are still unsure of what role these will play, as seven out of ten doctors say they don’t know exactly what they want from digital health solutions. Most disagreed that new technology could ever replace physical check-ups, but it does seem that it could complement them. More doctors agreed than disagreed that health and lifestyle apps would “form part of” treatment plans in future.

It’s not all rosy, however, as a quarter of doctors are concerned that mobile apps for patients will create more conflicts between doctors and patients. The biggest concern is that patients will misunderstand the information.

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

IDTechEx to explore new opportunities and trends in wearable technology

IDTechEx to explore new opportunities and trends in wearable technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The IDTechEx Wearable USA event, a unique international conference and exhibition that focuses on wearable technology requirements from big brands and industries, is set to take place in Santa Clara, US, from 18-19 November.
Richard Platt's insight:
The Way forward for wearables:  In most cases, the way forward is to abandon the 100 year old components in a box approach of almost all manufacturers of wearable technology today, according to organisers.  “Instead, we shall use structural electronics where smart materials are key. This will be a cornucopia for manufacturers of electronic and electrically functional materials that can be made into structures using those increasingly crucial intermediate materials,” they report.

IDTechEx Research expects that in 2025 US 25 billion will be spent on formulations and intermediate materials, of the US 74 billion wearable technology industry.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Healthcare and Technology news
Scoop.it!

NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information

NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

The NIH is currently asking for pubic feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect health and lifestyle data for its Precision Medicine Initiative — an initiative that hopes to collect data on more than 1 million individuals. The NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative is described as:

 

a bold new enterprise to revolutionize medicine and generate the scientific evidence needed to move the concept of precision medicine into every day clinical practice

 

What exactly that means is a bit nebulous, but a New England Journal of Medicineperspective sheds some light:

 

Ultimately, we will need to evaluate the most promising approaches in much larger numbers of people over longer periods. Toward this end, we envisage assembling over time a longitudinal “cohort” of 1 million or more Americans who have volunteered to participate in research.

 

Qualified researchers from many organizations will, with appropriate protection of patient confidentiality, have access to the cohort’s data, so that the world’s brightest scientific and clinical minds can contribute insights and analysis.

 

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

 

Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.

 

It’s exciting to see the NIH see the potential of digital health. They specifically mention how smartphones and wearables can be utilized to collect a wide variety of data: location information, mobile questionnaires, heart rate, physical activity levels, and more.

 

There is already a robust discussion taking place in the comments section at the NIH website, and we encourage our readers to contribute.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Richard Platt's insight:

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
more...
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, July 31, 2015 1:31 AM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Adrian Adewunmi Ph.D's curator insight, July 31, 2015 7:29 AM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Heather Taylor's curator insight, August 31, 2015 10:33 PM

#wearables #healthcare #wearabledevices

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

How to build a unified mobile strategy for the wearable age

How to build a unified mobile strategy for the wearable age | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The trend towards wearables in enterprise means another step towards a seamless digital experience for employees
Richard Platt's insight:

Nothing really new in this article, but what I did notice was that someone is highlighting the very real issue of email overload and if it was possible to lower that productivity hit that emails have upon employees, read below. 


Bye-bye email!?!  -  Did you know most employees spend about 11 hours of the workweek responding to emails? Wearable technology in the workforce may replace mundane emails – especially when process-based mobile applications with a strong social interface are integrated with wearable technology. Cutting email overload means that employees will be able to spend more time with work-related tasks instead of replying to multiple emails.

Pairing: This one’s specifically true for companies that use Apple products in their BYOD strategy. As an extension of the iPhone rather a stand-alone device, it is exceedingly easy for employees to start pairing up the Apple Watch with their already corporate-approved iPhones. In that way, companies are already taking steps toward a unified digital enterprise.

On-the-go: The promise of wearables has always been to make information more accessible on-the-go. Unfortunately, most enterprises also face the same issues when adding wearables to their enterprise mobility plan: security. The solution is simple: Begin with an application platform for business operations that can negate unknown security threats. Application platforms enable companies to create specific applications that can work natively on any device, wearable or otherwise.

more...
Miguel Acero's curator insight, July 31, 2015 10:55 AM

Nothing really new in this article, but what I did notice was that someone is highlighting the very real issue of email overload and if it was possible to lower that productivity hit that emails have upon employees, read below. 

 

Bye-bye email!?!  -  Did you know most employees spend about 11 hours of the workweek responding to emails? Wearable technology in the workforce may replace mundane emails – especially when process-based mobile applications with a strong social interface are integrated with wearable technology. Cutting email overload means that employees will be able to spend more time with work-related tasks instead of replying to multiple emails.

Pairing: This one’s specifically true for companies that use Apple products in their BYOD strategy. As an extension of the iPhone rather a stand-alone device, it is exceedingly easy for employees to start pairing up the Apple Watch with their already corporate-approved iPhones. In that way, companies are already taking steps toward a unified digital enterprise.

On-the-go: The promise of wearables has always been to make information more accessible on-the-go. Unfortunately, most enterprises also face the same issues when adding wearables to their enterprise mobility plan: security. The solution is simple: Begin with an application platform for business operations that can negate unknown security threats. Application platforms enable companies to create specific applications that can work natively on any device, wearable or otherwise.

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable technology in the classroom: what's available and what does it do?

Wearable technology in the classroom: what's available and what does it do? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
There’s little stopping teachers experimenting with ‘wearables’ such as virtual reality headsets in lessons. Journalist David Nield explores what’s out there
Richard Platt's insight:

“The creativity we have seen from teachers, and the engagement from students, has been incredible,” says Google’s Ben Schrom, product manager for Expeditions.  They are using Expeditions, a new classroom initiative unveiled by Google in May. The inexpensive cardboard contraption – literally a folded piece of cardboard with lenses attached – turns a smartphone into a VR viewer.  More than 100 classes have already used it to transport students to places such as Verona in Italy to study Romeo and Juliet and California to explore a coral reef.


One of a small number of teachers already working with wearables in the classroom is Margaret Powers, a technology coordinator from Pennsylvania, US. Her 365 Days of Glass blog is an exploration of how the experimental AR Google Glass headset can make a difference to education, by documenting field trips and conducting experiments, for example.  “Glass works best for capturing documentation of student learning and discovery, either from a student’s perspective or from the teacher’s,” Powers says. “I think other devices like the Apple Watch and Google Cardboard offer some exciting possibilities for education. I envision teachers or even students using wearables to help monitor when they need to take a brain break and stretch and run, or practise some mindfulness. There is a lot of potential for innovation.”  -  Powers adds that these devices could empower students and teachers to look at learning throughout the day and reflect on their working patterns. She also hopes they will enable more global partnerships between classrooms, so after touring another country on a virtual field trip through Cardboard, students could use Glass to have a Google Hangout with students there.


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

Dissolvable Patches can replace need for needles

Dissolvable Patches can replace need for needles | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A study into flu treatment suggests we could do away with needles, using a dissolvable patch to administer vaccines instead | no needles

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

A study into flu treatment suggests we could do away with needles, using a dissolvable patch to administer vaccines instead.  There are plenty of people out there with a fear of needles, reportedly one in five people suffer from what’s called trypanophobia.  To be honest, even the rest of us who aren’t afraid of them would still rather a situation that didn’t involve a needle being shoved into our arms.  Research by Osaka University academics in Japan that points to a future of no needles, for some cases, should be welcomed by many.

No needles: A novel approach

But Nakagawa used water to make the patch, and hyaluronic acid to create the needles – hyaluronic acid is something that humans naturally produce to cushion their joints.

When the patch is applied like a plaster, the needles pierce the top layer of skin without causing pain and dissolve into the body, taking the vaccine with them.   “Because the new patch is so easy to use, we believe it will be particularly effective in supporting vaccination in developing countries,” said Professor Nakagawa, professor of biotechnology and therapeutics at Osaka University. By testing the patches with flu vaccines, the results seemed positive, with results showing that patients had at least as much a reaction as those treated traditionally — the paper doesn’t detail who, of those treated, subsequently got the flu.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Death of Fitness Bands Imminent, Predicts Virgin Active CIO

Death of Fitness Bands Imminent, Predicts Virgin Active CIO | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Virgin Active CIO believes fitness bands will soon be a thing of past.
Richard Platt's insight:

CIO of international health club operator Virgin Active, Andy Caddy believes these high-end bands are already about to die. Talking to Computing, Caddy said he doesn’t think fitness bands would be around in the next two years or so.  -  “I’ve seen the fitness band market evolve over the last few years but I don’t think it’s going to last much longer in terms of the $100 bands,” Caddy believes wearables are actually in a transition phase at the moment, which may result in products that can compute multiple functions or into clothing.  After the launch of smartwatches, the signs of shift are becoming more evident. The high-end watches, especially the Apple Watch, come with all the functionalities of these smart bands, as they have built-in fitness and health apps, in addition to the typical smartphone features.  Caddy said Virgin Active has special interest in the wearable domain, but he believes the market is currently immature. What it really needs is a consumer-centric set of standards to which all the bigger technology vendors agree.

He said, “What I’d like to see is some of the big guys like Samsung, Apple and Google really come up with some standards because there aren’t really many standards in this space"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

A Wi-Fi Reflector Chip To Speed Up Wearables - from NASA

A Wi-Fi Reflector Chip To Speed Up Wearables - from NASA | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Whether you
Richard Platt's insight:

"The idea is if the wearable device only needs to reflect the Wi-Fi signal from a router or cell tower, instead of generate it, the power consumption can go way down (and the battery life can go way up)," Adrian Tang of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory said.  He and M.C. Frank Chang at the University of California, Los Angeles, have been working on microchips for wearable devices that reflect wireless signals instead of using regular transmitters and receivers. Their solution transmits information up to three times faster than regular Wi-Fi.  The challenge for Tang and his colleagues is that the wearable device isn't the only object in a room that reflects signals - so do walls, floors, ceilings, furniture and whatever other objects happen to be around. The chip in the wearable device needs to differentiate between the real Wi-Fi signal and the reflection from the background.

To overcome background reflections, Tang and Chang developed a wireless silicon chip that constantly senses and suppresses background reflections, enabling the Wi-Fi signal to be transmitted without interference from surrounding objects.  The technologists have tested the system at distances of up to 20 feet (6 meters). At about 8 feet (2.5 meters), they achieved a data transfer rate of 330 megabits per second, which is about three times the current Wi-Fi rate, using about a thousand times less power than a regular Wi-Fi link.  FYI - NASA and JPL uses TRIZ methods

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Another Review of the Apple Watch: "30 days later, I’m returning mine"

Another Review of the Apple Watch: "30 days later, I’m returning mine" | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Apple Watch is already showing signs of brilliance, but the list of things that need to be added, subtracted, or fixed is just too long.
Richard Platt's insight:

Basically it's a distraction and doesn't do enough to add value to one's life.  "The Apple Watch is solid first draft of a new kind of product. It’s already showing signs of brilliance, but the list of things that need to be added, subtracted, or fixed is just too long right now. And the app developer community needs to learn more about device before they can create apps that make it really sing."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable health technology and HIPAA: What is and isn't covered

Wearable health technology and HIPAA: What is and isn't covered | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
With wearable health technology tracking a person's every move and heartbeat, some experts are concerned by what's not covered by HIPAA, while others don't see a threat.
Richard Platt's insight:

The HIPAA Security Rule is concerned with PHI (personal health information) and, according to the Human Research Protection Program at the University of California, San Francisco, there are 18 criteria defining what PHI is under HIPAA includes information such as the patient's name, address, phone number and Social Security number.  "So someone's name is likely a HIPAA-protected data element, but blood pressure alone is likely not, unless it is linked to a patient," Although a blood pressure reading is something many people associate as sensitive health information, "HIPAA in and of itself generally … is not worried so much about anything other than identifying the patient."  - Read on for a more informed p.o.v. about this important element of healthcare related wearable information.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

​Barclaycard bPay band: Another Use Case of wearable awkwardness

​Barclaycard bPay band: Another Use Case of wearable awkwardness | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
I arrive at the counter and put in my order: one white Americano. The barista asks for two British pounds. Little does he know that social conventions are about to burst into flames. We've now locked in a complex social and subconscious dance. He's looking for my reaction. He wants me to pull my wallet…
Richard Platt's insight:

Bottom Line: Barclay's new wearable bPay isn't a serious product – it's another standard-bearer for the payment revolution and a exercise for Barclaycard to show it's a forward thinking bank (which doesn't support Apple Pay). While contactless cards moved us away from old chip-and-pin, bands like this are primers for a future where our bank cards no longer exist at all.  The bPay wristband is a great publicity tool – but the furthest from a usable and desirable solution.  Given the lack of need for any kind of technology whatsoever, it's actually slightly bemusing why the bPay band is so large. But its size and similarity to a prisoner's day release tracker are not the most awkward thing about it. It's that silence, the one that myself and the barista are still locked in.  -  "I'm going to pay by contactless," became my stock request to overcome those silences, a subtext for "JUST TURN ON THE CONTACTLESS MACHINE AND STOP STARING ALREADY". Standing there gormlessly or raising the cuff of my jacket to reveal the bracelet became something I came to dread.

What we learned about wearable payments.  It's not a problem that's just Barclaycard's. Using Apple Pay also means you have to endure the same thing – although as it becomes more widely recognised the problem should dissipate. I will flash the Watch, they will know that's how I need to pay. The bPay will never enjoy the same ubiquity.

That's already starting to happen. During a failed Apple Pay payment at our local store (resulting from not quite being able to fully contort my arm to make a good connection with the payment reader) the guy behind me asked "have you actually got that to work yet?" He was genuinely interested. He made the awkward situation okay.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Hackers take over Jeep's brakes

Hackers take over Jeep's brakes | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
In a video for Wired, cybersecurity experts demonstrated how they could hack into a Jeep and disable its brakes. CBS News correspondent Kris Van Cleave reports on the threat and what Congress plans to do about it.
Richard Platt's insight:

Video on the Fiat Chrysler Jeep Hack, and how the hackers did it.

more...
No comment yet.