Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Prevent "Body Hacking" With Wearable Tech Protection

Prevent "Body Hacking" With Wearable Tech Protection | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wireless Armour a smart underwear with a wearable tech protection, aims to protect male fertility of harmful electromagnetic radiation.
Richard Platt's insight:

Findings show a strong correlation between EMR exposure and lower sperm health. In one study in vitro sperm motility dropped to 49% and viability to 52% after just one hour of exposure to radiation emitted by a mobile phone.  World Health Organisation (WHO) has assigned EMR as possibly carcinogenic to humans, in the category 2B, the same category as petrol exhaust fumes and other pollutants.  Described by Sir Richard Branson as “underpants for superheroes”, British scientist unveils a wearable tech protection idea in a smart underwear that aims to protect male fertility.   Wireless Armour, a new line of smart underwear, aims to protect male fertility by using a mesh of pure silver woven into fabric to shield against 99.9% of harmful electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitted by internet connected devices: smartphones, wearables devices, laptops, IoT devices, etc.    Wireless Armour smart underwear has been tested by an industry leader in wireless shielding and the results show that fabric shields against 99.9% of the radiation emitted between 100MHz to 2.6GHz. Simply put, this covers the entire range of radiation emitted by wireless devices, from voice and text through to 4G and Wi-Fi, almost everything is blocked.   Faraday cages, named after inventor Michael Faraday, are used to protect electronics from interference by blocking the current. There are specially designed rooms in parliament, banks or even stock market where servers are protected by this technology.

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Google to Help Develop Wearable Blood Sugar Sensor

Google to Help Develop Wearable Blood Sugar Sensor | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google has taken another step into the healthcare business, this time by partnering in the development of a low-cost, wearable, bandage-size sensor that monitors the glucose levels of people with all types of diabetes.
Working with the sensor technology company DexCom, Google says the sensor will simplify glucose-monitoring and make it easier for people to proactively manage their health. The companies believe it could replace today's common monitoring process that requires getting blood samples by pricking your fingers regularly. 
Previous health technology from Google includes a wearable health tracking wristband that measures heart rhythm, pulse and skin temperature, revealed in June. It also announced the planned development of a glucose-monitoring contact lens. 
DexCom has estimated the glucose sensor will be on the market with five years. 
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 29 million Americans have diabetes, with 1 in 4 unaware that they are affected by the condition. 
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Richard Platt's insight:

Google has taken another step into the healthcare business, this time by partnering in the development of a low-cost, wearable, bandage-size sensor that monitors the glucose levels of people with all types of diabetes.   Working with the sensor technology company DexCom, Google says the sensor will simplify glucose-monitoring and make it easier for people to proactively manage their health. The companies believe it could replace today's common monitoring process that requires getting blood samples by pricking your fingers regularly.

Previous health technology from Google includes a wearable health tracking wristband that measures heart rhythm, pulse and skin temperature, revealed in June. It also announced the planned development of a glucose-monitoring contact lens.   DexCom has estimated the glucose sensor will be on the market with five years.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 29 million Americans have diabetes, with 1 in 4 unaware that they are affected by the condition.

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UL Testing Safety, Privacy Issues Related to Wearable Devices

UL Testing Safety, Privacy Issues Related to Wearable Devices | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Physical and privacy risks relating to wearable devices has prompted a familiar face in the safety arena to research the technology. With so many questions
Richard Platt's insight:

With so many questions relating to wearable device safety, Underwriters Laboratories has delved into the wearable technology space, said Anura Fernando, principal engineer, eHealth – Medical Systems Interoperability and mHealth at Underwriter Laboratories.  Initially, UL’s research was focused mainly on materials characteristics that were relevant to either the initiation or spread of a fire. Fernando said that its research has gradually expanded into examining an entire product’s life cycle.   -  “We were originally involved in testing products after they were developed and as they were getting ready to enter the market, to make sure that they met this baseline of safety requirements that would ensure that they didn’t catch on fire or pose a shock hazard,” explained Fernando. “We began to recognize that these kinds of safety issues really need to be thought about right from the very beginning of the product’s life cycle…at its inception.”   For the past 30 years, UL has worked with manufacturers from product concept all the way through decommissioning,  “It’s important to think about what happens to the product after it’s finished on the market. How do you dispose of it? What are some of the material disposal considerations? Do the products have hazardous materials that shouldn’t be disposed of in landfills?” he said. “Now we’ve shifted to this begin to end life cycle model.”   The Internet of Things and cloud computing are very much analogous today to what electricity was 100 years ago.  We are beginning to look more and more at data, what role data plays. New ways that power is utilized.”  -  In addition, UL is analyzing how data is protected, examining encryption and storage methods.

“How do you ensure the integrity of data, so that data that starts from point A doesn’t end up somehow convoluted into something else when it arrives at point B? What do you do about hackers who are trying to penetrate these systems?”   -  How a wearable device product interacts with human skin is also being analyzed. Fernando explained that there are many different plastic and electronic components packaged in wearable applications. He said different use scenarios need to be considered.   “If it’s a wearable product that’s going to be in long term contact with human skin, then you may want to know what its bio compatibility characteristics are,”  “The very same tools that we use to characterize the material for electrical purposes, things like infrared spectroscopy, can now be used to also characterize the materials relative to biocompatibility. Then once the biocompatibility of the material’s been tracked, then you have things like its IR (infrared) signature that we can track to make sure that the material consistency remains the same.”  Many of the devices use lithium ion rechargeable batteries. It’s important to think in terms of how this type of technology could fail and what the results of failure would be.

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Why we should all be furious with fitness wearables

Why we should all be furious with fitness wearables | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
So much data, so little use
Richard Platt's insight:

My argument spelled out against the current spate of wearable designs in this current article:  "It is me realising that something is really wrong with wearables.  Something happened to me on a recent recovery run in Hyde Park, and it irritated me to the point I deleted this week's piece to write about it.  I was trying out Moov's 'Running Efficiency' setup (Moov being an ankle strap that monitors your stride for things like impact, lean, stride length etc.) when I was consumed with anger.  Not at the Moov system itself, which is more than half-decent, but at the fact fitness tech fans are being short changed. The app was telling me to shift my weight about a bit to get a better stride, when I was sure that I had – and I started wondering if it would be better if there were more sensors in the soles of my shoes.  And that's when the fury lit, the straw that broke my CamelBak. Regular readers will remember when I outlined one of my favourite bits of technology, the Nike Lunar TR1+ training system, from way back in 2010.  These had just those sensors, four placed around the sole that could monitor footfall or check on how you're performing a circuit workout. Five years ago. Half a decade.  The reason this was the tipping point was it was the second time in a week I was stymied in my attempts to improve running through tech thanks to not being able to use one service with another.  I've been trying out SmashRun, the service that has more stats in it than anything I've ever seen. Like most runners, I love to pore over training results, see where I'm doing better or worse, and try to use that science to get better."

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Wearables smothering Swiss watch business, Fossil CEO says

Wearables smothering Swiss watch business, Fossil CEO says | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Fossil will start selling an Android Wear smartwatch in October or November, said CEO Kosta Kartsotis
Richard Platt's insight:

“I think technology and the whole idea of wearables ... has taken some of the oxygen out of the Swiss business,” Fossil CEO Kosta Kartsotis told analysts Tuesday on a call to discuss the watch maker’s second quarter results.  Without mentioning Apple or its smartwatch by name, Kartsotis implied the arrival of tech companies in the fashion world means the industry needs to incorporate technology into its products to stay trendy.  “We also see technology emerging as the latest trend in fashion, with the growing interest in wearable technology inspiring new entrants into the watch space,”  -  It is unclear what impact smartwatches will have on the sale of analog timepieces. Some analysts predict that consumers are more inclined to purchase sensor-equipped devices that do more than tell time. Last week, a report from market research firm NPD Group claimed the Apple Watch was partially behind the largest slump in U.S. watch sales since 2008.  - Fossil sees wearables as a key component of the industry’s future and the company is developing three product categories around the technology.

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NASA is asking the public to design smartwatch apps for its astronauts

NASA is looking to capitalize on the growing smartwatch trend, and it needs your help to do so. The space agency is hosting a contest with Freelancer.com, challenging participants to design the...
Richard Platt's insight:

NASA is turning more to crowdsourcing methods to help come up with innovative designs and engineering ideas for its space missions. In May NASA announced its "Journey to Mars Challenge," which asked the general public to come up with ways to keep Martian astronauts safe while needing limited resupplies from Earth. The space agency also teamed up with Freelancer.com in July, asking for new tool designs to be used by Robonaut 2 — the humanoid robot on the ISS.  Those interested in designing the app should make it compatible with the Samsung Gear 2 (sorry Apple Watch) and present their ideas as pictures "highlighting the unique design’s navigation, interaction, layout, look, feel, etc." There are less than four weeks remaining in the contest, and only six people have joined so far, so the competition is still thin. But with 16 million users registered at Freelancer.com, that pool probably will grow.  

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Robert Isacovici's curator insight, August 17, 2015 12:44 PM

Hi-tech solutions inspired  by the general public. What a great  idea, I believe inspiration is everywhere. this is a fantastic way to promote interest in technology and tap onto  the creativity of millions of people.

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Here's the biggest thing to hit live music since electric amps

Here's the biggest thing to hit live music since electric amps | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Our eyes may have lost out when Google Glass proved to be about as useful as a Segway, and almost as embarrassing to own. But these days, the most likely body part to get upgraded by mass-market technology is our ears.
Richard Platt's insight:

Augmented hearing buds could be the biggest thing to hit live music since electric amplification, which changed the very nature of music, from orchestras and big bands to small combos playing through microphones and amps. Once everyone in a venue is wearing augmented ears, artists will be able to rethink the way the music gets to our brains. Maybe every member of the band will play in a different corner of the room, allowing audience members to wander from one musician to the other, seeing the performance intimately while still hearing the sound all perfectly mixed together

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Most Interesting Markets to Enter with Wearables Today

Most Interesting Markets to Enter with Wearables Today | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Throughout 2015, the wearables market has maintained an upward trajectory and it’s expected to keep growing.Growth in this segment can probably be attributed to the fitn
Richard Platt's insight:

According to CCS Insight, the market research indicates that wearables will take a strange turn producing a line of new products that they call “long tail” of wearables. This segment is comprised of smart devices like clothing and smart shoes, jewelry, sex toys, and adhesive sensors/patches. Most of these products are expected to come from startup businesses and not all of these crowd-funded gadgets will succeed. So it will be interesting to see how these devices will impact fashion, adult entertainment, and digital health. - Expect the wearable market to totally morph and change over time, it's definitely still in it's infancy, lots of development work to make this stuff easy to use and truly benefit from.

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Wearable Technology Creeps Into The Workplace

Wearable Technology Creeps Into The Workplace | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
There's a fine line between productivity monitoring and oppressive surveillance
Richard Platt's insight:

It's all part of a trend toward using technology - usually wearable devices like smartglasses, wristbands, smartwatches and badges rather than implantable ones - to monitor employee movements and improve productivity. The promise of data-driven efficiency can be alluring to the board room, but it comes at a cost: the employee's right to privacy.  "It started with big data discussions around gathering business insights and not having the human accounted for in that data puzzle. Wearable technology can help make the workforce visible in that,"   -  Devices must be paired with a powerful back-end system, however.   "Wearables are not useful on their own," adds Guillaume Roques, head of developer relations EMEA at Salesforce. "They have to be part of the move toward a system of intelligence, which combines big data, the cloud and analytics. Connecting them all together is a big challenge."

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5 Predictions for Wearable Technology

5 Predictions for Wearable Technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

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Richard Platt's insight:

1.  Data-Facilitated Care:  Embedded biometric sensors and software that provide continuous capture, delivery and interpretation of health and performance. This allows physicians, care teams and coaches to make prescriptive decisions quickly and from anywhere.

2.   Personalized Wearables:   “Made-to-fit" sensor-equipped apparel and medical devices that use 3D-printing technology for individual customization.

3.   Active Coaching: Sensor-embedded hardware and apparel that monitor performance, provide interpretation and make suggestions on how to progress. This next step in wearable technology will help individuals improve everything from their fitness to their biomechanics (posture and gait for example).

4.  Gesture-Based Interfaces:  Human-to-computer interactions that let individuals use gestures and other natural movements to interact with devices. By adopting everyday movements and gestures in lieu of complex machine-based tasks, we can improve the user experience and make it easier for people to onboard to new devices and software.

5.  Authentication:  Wearables that have the ability to provide a unique signature to the individual. Use of distinctive characteristics, such as heart rhythm, could take the place of outdated credentialing methods like a written password.

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Where are the wearable tech companies placing their bets on the Human Body?

Where are the wearable tech companies placing their bets on the Human Body? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Until you now, many could reasonably assume that Apple Watch and Google Glass are the only two significant bits of wearable technology to have hit the market.
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Many could reasonably (incorrectly) assume that the Apple Watch and the Google Glass are the only two significant bits of wearable technology to have hit the market. Wrong! Don’t believe the hype. Check out the infographic

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Is Lionel Messi wearing a sports bra?

Is Lionel Messi wearing a sports bra? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Barcelona superstar revealed an eyebrow-raising undergarment underneath his kit on Wednesday.
Richard Platt's insight:

The answer is no. At 158 pounds, Messi clearly doesn’t need any extra support up top. He’s wearing the tight crop top instead to record his vital statistics during the match.   -  Called StatSports Viper, the wearable technology measures his heart rate, the distance he ran, his acceleration rate, metabolic load distance and a whole slew of other variables. Messi’s friend in the photo, Italian legend Francesco Totti who plays for Roma, also wore the technology on Wednesday, according to the company. (He must have taken his off before the photo, however.)    Barcelona and Roma are just two of the dozens of elite teams that use wearable technology to try to understand how their players expend energy during matches. In practice, it’s not uncommon to see players, such as Dani Alves, wear the garments outside their kits. In games, though, it’s always worn underneath. - Get your game on. with some wearable tech and a good coach who knows how to read the data.

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The Timepiece That Will Revolutionize the Watch World Isn’t Made by Apple. It’s by Swatch.

The Timepiece That Will Revolutionize the Watch World Isn’t Made by Apple. It’s by Swatch. | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Apple’s design mastermind Jony Ive spoke in no uncertain terms when he described what the Apple Watch would mean for Switzerland: The old watch companies, he said, were doomed. (Actually, he used a more colorful term.) Bravado aside, Ive has a point. The Swiss watch industry has to be concerned...
Richard Platt's insight:

Last year, Swatch released a new model called Sistem51. Unlike most of the watches in the affordable Swiss watch company’s line, the Sistem51 is mechanical: Rather than using a battery, as in a quartz watch, it stores energy by using the motion of your wrist to wind it. Unlike any other Swiss mechanical, the Sistem51 is built entirely on a 65-foot-long automated assembly line, without any human intervention. Maybe most significantly, the Sistem51 costs just $150—a shockingly low price point for a mechanical watch that is 100 percent Swiss made. A decent Swiss mechanical with a reliable timekeeping mechanism inside it starts north of $500 (usually closer to $1,000), and prices quickly rise from there: an automatic TAG Heuer will run you over $2,000, a Rolex starts at about $5,000, and the high luxury watches—the likes of Patek Philippe, Jaeger-LeCoultre, or Vacheron Constantin—run up into five and six digits.  For all these reasons, Swatch’s new affordable mechanical is getting a lot more attention in the watch world than a Swatch normally would. Aficionados who usually focus on prestige brands have referred to it as “clearly one of the most important new watches of the last 10 years.”    At its launch, Swatch described Sistem51 as “a provocation” to the industry at large. The notion of an affordable mechanical watch is a serious change for Swiss luxury watch companies, which generally operate in a bubble of escalating prices and high-end consumers willing to pay top dollar for the latest models.  


But the goal isn’t to compete with Apple’s technological prowess: It’s to generate enthusiasm for Swiss craftsmanship on a much wider base. As an entry-level brand, Swatch has always been about drawing in potential watch buyers and functioning as a gateway drug to the Swatch Group’s higher-value offerings. 

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Apple Watch Tossed Out Of Major League Baseball Dugout

Apple Watch Tossed Out Of Major League Baseball Dugout | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Apple Watch banned from MLB dugouts.

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
Richard Platt's insight:

Another failure for the AppleWatch, this time it's a bigger PR hit.  

Apple Watch has many fans, but the Major League Baseball organization is not among them — or is it?  -  Consider the fact that the MLB has banned the ubiquitous smart device from dugouts during games, as SlashGear reported Wednesday (Aug. 19). The ban itself traces its genesis to a general ban by the commission on smartphone use in those locations in general, and the latest extension to the rule, which ties in to Apple, came after the MLB got wind that Ned Yost, who manages the Kansas City Royals, was wearing the smartwatch during games. The odd part of this story comes from the fact that the MLB is the very entity that gave Yost the Apple Watch in the first place. The gift from the MLB came after the manager had been part of the All-Star Game that took place in July.  -  SlashGear noted that The Kansas City Star reported that when the MLB contacted Yost about his wearing the device in the dugout, the manager actually tried to explain to its would-be benefactor (and now critic) that there was nothing “smart” about the device when it is in fact not physically near the phone with which it is paired. In that event, of course, Apple Watch functions solely as a watch, with timekeeping functions.

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WEARABLES: Who's buying them, what they want from them, and are they here to stay

WEARABLES: Who's buying them, what they want from them, and are they here to stay | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Who will be first to get it right?
Richard Platt's insight:

Here's the huge challenge for those in the business of trying to figure out what makes a wearable that consumers will actually fall in love with. “Keep it simple” seems to be the winning formula.    But that just flies annoyingly in the face of developers who want to wow the world, which equally annoyingly, responds with a collective “meh” when the latest product evolution fails to propel them a satisfying distance into the future.  -  So SDL monitored 50 billion conversations on social media to find out what people talked about most, when they talked about wearables. Here’s what’s important to them:

Battery life? Nope. Price? Nope.  They want apps, and they’re also prepared to wait for version 2.0, because they know it will be better. A very basic reading of that gives you the manufacturer’s dilemma in a nutshell – convince developers to create apps for a device that probably won’t sell very well for a year, but must tantalise consumers enough that they’ll hold off on switching to the competition until you can deliver an upgrade.  And they don’t want to look like the Borg


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Ear-Worn Wearables Aimed at Giving You Bionic Hearing Are on the Way

Ear-Worn Wearables Aimed at Giving You Bionic Hearing Are on the Way | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Startups like Doppler Labs are building earbuds that will let you turn down the volume on crying babies and pump up the bass on live music.
Richard Platt's insight:

Doppler’s earbuds work by using algorithms to cancel out sounds you don’t want to hear as they enter your ear, while letting through the sounds you do want. It’s all controlled with a smartphone app, and the company plans to include settings for situations like live music and travel. When I tried it, it did work, though I didn’t get to test it out in a stressful situation like a plane trip with a crying baby.   Nuheara, meanwhile, is trying to do something similar to Doppler but also plans to let users of its forthcoming wireless earbuds connect with digital audio—music, phone calls, and, on the iPhone, Siri. David Cannington, a cofounder of Nuheara and its head of sales and marketing, says an iPhone app will let users do things like adjust background noise to enhance music they’re listening to or boost their hearing in a noisy restaurant. Cannington says the company hopes to have a working prototype by the end of the year and to start selling the earbuds in late 2016 for “less than $300.”  -  Like all kinds of wearables hitting the market, though, those made by Doppler, Nuheara, and others are facing formidable challenges with technology and comfort. Since they tend to use Bluetooth for communication between the in-ear device and a smartphone app, they depend on that wireless technology to work well—and as anyone who’s used a Bluetooth headset knows, the sound quality can be choppy even over very short distances.

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How Wearable Devices Impact the Battlefield and Athletics

How Wearable Devices Impact the Battlefield and Athletics | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Out of all wearable devices, one new tool could make a difference for patients in disaster situations or may even help soldiers on the battlefield.
Richard Platt's insight:

“It’s the athletes and the people on the frontlines that will help define the industry. We’re the early adopters but we’re also a megaphone for the rest of the athletes in the market,”  - While certainly athletes and warriors are certainly apart of the early adopter demographic of wearable users, just not the only ones.

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EnChroma’s Accidental Spectacles Find Niche Among the Colorblind

EnChroma’s Accidental Spectacles Find Niche Among the Colorblind | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
An inventor of lenses invented to aid surgeons found that they could also help the colorblind, leading him to start a company that sells glasses.
Richard Platt's insight:

The eyeglass lenses that Don McPherson invented were meant for surgeons. But through serendipity he found an entirely different use for them: as a possible treatment for colorblindness.  Mr. McPherson is a glass scientist and an avid Ultimate Frisbee player. He discovered that the lenses he had invented, which protect surgeons’ eyes from lasers and help them differentiate human tissue, caused the world at large to look candy-colored — including the Frisbee field.   -  One of EnChroma’s misfires was a marketing approach that emphasized the science behind the glasses. “That doesn’t work for something like colorblindness, which is a really experiential thing,”     “It’s not until the benefits of a new technology are overwhelming that we all flock to the new device or service,” said Suleiman Kassicieh, distinguished professor of management of technology at the University of New Mexico Anderson School of Management.  -  Another early hurdle was that opticians and optometrists could not carve prescriptions into the EnChroma lenses, as they can with traditional lenses. The steep price did not help win customers, either.  -  The founders looked at ways to bring costs down while still creating a similar product. They hired a manufacturer that was more cost-efficient and also able to tweak the application of the filters so the lenses could be used in prescription glasses.

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Wearables help manage neuro disorders, predict symptoms

Wearables help manage neuro disorders, predict symptoms | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearables not only can monitor symptoms of neurological disorders automatically, they may be able to predict seizures and disease progression.
Richard Platt's insight:

While none of these systems have completed the FDA approval process, Neurology Now also listed a few that have earned or are close to earning regulatory clearance.  -  An article appearing in the August/September issue of the journal Neurology Now highlights some wearables that show promise for treating people with epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis because the technology can collect data anywhere and anytime, not just in a clinical environment.   “With this more precise information, we can often spot problems even before a patient is aware of them,” Dr. Joseph I. Sirven, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and a member of the Neurology Now editorial advisory board, is quoted as saying.

For example, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is testing a watch that may be able to predict epileptic seizures by measuring skin moisture.  At Cleveland Clinic, researchers have strapped iPads to the back of people with MS to measure walking speed, balance and manual dexterity, the journal reported. Biotech firm Biogen has teamed with Google X to try to glean MS-related data from Fitbits, though “the bands are still not sophisticated or sensitive enough to provide consistently accurate data,” according to the article.

For Parkinson’s patients, the article discussed Parkinson mPower, an app linked to Apple’s Research Kit.

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How Wearables Startups Can Overcome The Hardware Challenge

How Wearables Startups Can Overcome The Hardware Challenge | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

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Richard Platt's insight:

Proper planning can help overcome numerous issues, perhaps most importantly, the matter of "technology mismatch": Your wearable might be based on outdated concepts, or it may simply not meet users’ needs.  -  You need to start doing end-user research, go into the field and find unmet needs and features that could be in the product,” said Patel. You may have performed sufficient initial research when you first designed your product, but technology evolves rapidly (see: Moore’s law), so it’s your product may require ongoing development to support new advancements.  Part of that process involves ongoing evaluation of the market, to see what other types of wearables are on the market now or in development, and then explore ways of improving your product.  The initial design of a device can take months, along with the time needed to create working prototypes. Hunting for the best manufacturing partners can be challenging, and locating the best materials—at the best price point—is key to production success. Straight-forward design and development costs can start in the hundreds of thousands of $$.  

Even with a solid design and working prototype, innovators face hurdles locating the perfect hardware for their device.  A device design can take about three months to complete.  In the rush to market, it’s easy to gloss over important aspects, particularly when it comes to addressing problems.   Providing clear, precise specifications for products is vital, as is having a plan for when issues occur (and they will occur). “The manufacturer might change the material they are making the product out of—or they may change a process they are using to assemble it—and that may cause defects,

Your device is ready to move to the production stage and it looks great. But is it really working the way it should?   Coping with manufacturing issues should be part of your strategy, and Patel emphasized the importance of managing your product with real-world testing: “In-line testing is very important. It catches any areas where the manufacturer—or even the line workers—may have changed the process,” he said.   The manufacturing process has an enormous effect on the product, so maintaining quality is crucial.

Although wearables are part of the mobile revolution, that doesn't mean that every mobile manufacturer is capable of creating the exact product you want.  It’s important to assess the capabilities of product development partners, Patel advises. Look into their experience and check "that they actually have a background in that sector (like wearables),”

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Wearable for Urinary Incontinence Tells You When To Pee

Wearable for Urinary Incontinence Tells You When To Pee | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Brightly is a new wearable that has the inconvenience and embarrassment of urinary incontinence in its cross-hairs.
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Brightly is a new wearable that has the inconvenience and embarrassment of urinary incontinence in its cross-hairs. Developed by Lir Scientific and currently undergoing user trials, the biosensor-loaded belt tracks the bladder’s expansion and notifies users via Bluetooth to their smartphone when it’s time to hit the head—something that many incontinence sufferers are physically unable to determine themselves.

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Wearable Tech to monitor Trauma Patients

Wearable Tech to monitor Trauma Patients | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Cambridge Design Partnership claims to have developed the world’s first wearable device to measure and monitor the vital signs of multiple trauma patients for emergency response in disasters and battlefield situations. The First Response Monitor – clipped to a casualty’s nose – is designed to help medics monitor both heart rate and respiratory rate and follows detailed discussions with army medics.
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Cambridge Design Partnership claims to have developed the world’s first wearable device to measure and monitor the vital signs of multiple trauma patients for emergency response in disasters and battlefield situations.  -  The First Response Monitor – clipped to a casualty’s nose – is designed to help medics monitor both heart rate and respiratory rate and follows detailed discussions with army medics.  Respiratory rate is often neglected by automated monitoring systems and has been described as the ‘forgotten bio-sign’, as many existing wearable monitors focus on heart rate alone and those that do measure respiratory rate have low accuracy or are difficult to use in an emergency situation.  However, the benefits of accurately monitoring respiratory rate are clear, and when combined with other parameters – such as heart rate and body temperature – can indicate life-threatening conditions such as sepsis.

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Why Fitbit Is Dominating the Wearable Market

Why Fitbit Is Dominating the Wearable Market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Mindfull Investors Venture Founding Partner Stuart Rudick examines Fitbit’s second quarter earnings and the rising demand for wearable technology. He speaks with Bloomberg’s Emily Chang and Stephen Pulvirent on “Bloomberg West.” (Source: Bloomberg)
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More details on Fitbit's recent earnings of better than expected earnings $400M, analysts chime in, everyone has an opinion, that Fitbit is the leader of the wearable technology space.

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Toronto Football Club embraces wearable technology to play better and train smarter

Toronto Football Club embraces wearable technology to play better and train smarter | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Personal GPS units help pro sports teams avoid injuries, manage workloads and test players more accurately than ever.
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Toronto Football (that be soccer to you yanks) Club  sports science director Jim Liston  won’t even start practice until every player straps on two pieces of wearable technology — a heart-rate monitor and a GPS unit that tracks speed and distance — each connected to a laptop that logs all the data in real time. Together, the monitoring systems cost the club about $40,000.  Liston foresees a day in high-level sport when wearable technology is as ubiquitous as athletic tape. Most Major League Soccer teams ues GPS trackers during practice, as do a growing number of NFL teams. The NHL’s Philadelphia Flyers, the NFL’s Detroit Lions and the NBA’s Orlando Magic use PUSH, a wearable system from a Toronto-based outfit that provides rep-by-rep feedback on weight training sessions.  “Companies are understanding the importance of the algorithm,” Alhamad says. “Form a hardware standpoint it’s pretty simple, but how can it all fit together and work well?”  -  As MLS teams adopted wearable GPS units, many used Adidas MiCoach technology, tailoring a mass-market product to a pro soccer team’s specific needs.  Roughly 1/2 of NFL teams use GPS data, mostly to track exertion and prevent overuse injuries.

“It can be pretty obvious when you look at the data display,” said Rod Lindsell of GPSports in a 2014 interview with ESPN.com. “You look at it and say this is a four-week injury waiting to happen, and really it is completely preventable.(with using wearable tech)”

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Fitbit sees revenue more than triple to $400M

Fitbit sees revenue more than triple to $400M | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technology company Fitbit sees its revenue beat expectations and more than triple to $400m (£256m) in the second quarter.
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In Fitbit's first report as a public company for the makers of wristbands and devices that track heart rate, calories, steps and sleep patterns.  The company had gone public in June and stocks had risen nearly 160% since its debut.  Net income rose to $17.7m in the quarter from $14.8m in the same period the previous year.  

The Bad News - Falling margins:  Margins fell, however, due to higher spending on new products.  The declining gross margins overshadowed the strong revenue and shares fell by more than 15% in Thursday's after-hour trading.  The company said adjusted margins fell to 47% in the three months ending June 30, down from 52% the previous year.  Fitbit said it does not expect margins to improve for the rest of the year.  And this is despite the firm selling 4.5 million devices in Q2.  

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