Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
14.1K views | +6 today
Follow
Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Withings Reveals Activite Steel Fitness Tracker

Withings Reveals Activite Steel Fitness Tracker | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The new Activite Steel has the high-end feel of the original wearable with the price of the Activite Pop.
Richard Platt's insight:

Withings today announced the latest member of its Activité line of activity trackers. The new Activité Steel has the high-end feel of the original Swiss-made wearable.  "While the tracker market is booming we see growing demand from health conscious people who are not willing to compromise their style," Withings CEO Cédric Hutchings said in a statement. "Steel is the perfect Christmas gift for those demanding trendsetters." It also resembles its predecessors, with dual dials—one showing the time, the other highlighting how much of your daily activity goal has been achieved. That target can be set in the free Withings Health Mate iOS or Android app—which, along with the wearable, keeps users in-the-know about their progress.  Also known for its smart home products, Withings in September upgraded The Aura   connected alarm clock to integrate with Spotify, allowing users with a Spotify Premium account to fall asleep or wake up to their favorite tunes. The Aura Connected Alarm Clock and sleep sensor accessory retail for $299.95, or $189.95 without the sleep sensor.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The smartwatch that calls time on the smartphone

One of the biggest criticisms leveled at the current generation of smartwatches, be they from Apple or one of the many companies supporting Google's Android Wear, is that without a connection to a phone, they're little more than glorified MP3 players that can tell the time. However, that is all about to change.
Richard Platt's insight:

One of the biggest criticisms leveled at the current generation of smartwatches, be they from Apple or one of the many companies supporting Google's Android Wear, is that without a connection to a phone, they're little more than glorified MP3 players that can tell the time. However, that is all about to change. From now on, with the latest update to the Android Wear operating system, smartwatches will support cellular connection via the LTE/4G network so that many of the apps function as will the ability to send and receive messages and even take or make calls, with or without a smartphone.  As Android Wear's product manager, Peter Ludwig, explains: "No more worrying about Bluetooth or WiFi – your watch will automatically switch to a cellular connection when you're out of range." "The wearable category is still in its infancy and we plan to continue introducing exciting devices that appeal to a diverse audience," said Juno Cho, president and chief executive officer of LG Electronics Mobile Communications Company, about LG's approach to the segment.  The inbuilt obsolescence of anything that uses silicon was a fundamental issue for TAG Heuer, a brand renowned for products that last a lifetime.  Its solution is to offer owners regular upgrades (for a fee) so that their watches stay up to date as the technology supporting them evolves. Better still, for those who decide a smartwatch isn't for them, they can trade in the Connected for a mechanical Tag Heuer Carrera instead.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Providing health services via wearable devices could, finally, become a reality

Providing health services via wearable devices could, finally, become a reality | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Healthcare systems around the world are facing a ‘perfect storm’, contending with rising costs, changing demographics and growing consumer expectations. In a recent report on healthcare in the UK, PA Consulting concluded that a vital component in helping to solve these problems could be the use of ultra-low-power wearable technology. Wearable technology, increasingly enabled by miniaturised ultra-low-power electronics, is said to be used by 8million people in the UK already, with many of those devices being healthcare related.
Richard Platt's insight:

Here it comes folks, wearables as health maintenance devices, like it or not, this tech is coming to you and yours soon enough.  Now the questions become how should the data be used, and by whom, make it secure, and not let those who would profit by this data at the expense of our own vulnerabilities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

WME | IMG Launches IoT Joint Venture With AGT International

WME | IMG Launches IoT Joint Venture With AGT International | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
WME | IMG has formed a joint venture with AGT International, a company that specializes in developing "Internet of Things" technology and delivering big data analytics, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.
Richard Platt's insight:

AGT will help develop an IoT platform for WME | IMG’s vast portfolio of more than 800 events, which include concerts as well as Wimbledon and Fashion Weeks around the world. The joint venture launched this week at Toronto Fashion Week with a small test sampling of volunteer models, designers and WME | IMG employees. The models are wearing biometric sensors and cameras that allow users to experience the catwalk from a first-person perspective. Meanwhile, employees in the audience are outfitted with their own biometric sensors that send real-time data to the designers about their physical reactions to each piece in their collections.  After a few more test runs at select events in the U.S. and Europe over the next couple of months, the joint venture will embark on a more comprehensive rollout next year.   For WME | IMG clients, event organizers will be able to monitor user experience in real-time, allowing them to respond and adapt quickly as needs arise. And with enough attendee opt-ins, artists and organizers alike will have access to deeper and more detailed consumer feedback. “Consumer and entertainment companies have been collecting insights for years, but very few of our clients and partners have had access to analytics that allow them to act on those insights to deliver relevant content and better experiences for their audiences,” WME | IMG co-CEO Ari Emanuel said in a statement. “Our partnership with AGT marks a paradigm shift, recognizing that IoT technology and data science will fundamentally change the way people experience live events, as well as how they consumer and share content that matters to them.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Fossil Q Founder Preview

Fossil Q Founder Preview | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about the Fossil Q Founder, including impressions and analysis, photos, video, release date, prices, specs, and predictions from CNET. - Page 1
Richard Platt's insight:

The Fossil Q Founder is the first Android Wear watch to include an Intel processor, but it won't be the last. The chipmaker also partnered with TAG Heuer for a still-unreleased Android Wear watch. To date, a majority of Android Wear watches have been equipped with a quad-core Snapdragon 400 processor from Qualcomm. It will be interesting to see how Intel's processor performs. We will know more in a few weeks when we begin testing the watch.  The Q Founder runs Android Wear and works with both iPhones and Android devices. You can view notifications on your wrist for things like calls, text messages, emails and calendar events. You will also get personalized Google cards with information on weather, sporting events, traffic and more. The watch doesn't include cellular capabilities, however, so you will have to be in Bluetooth range of your smartphone or connected to Wi-Fi for complete functionality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Lumo Aims For The Running Market With Launch Of “Smart” Pants To Improve Runners’ Posture

Lumo Aims For The Running Market With Launch Of “Smart” Pants To Improve Runners’ Posture | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Lumo, makers of the Lumo Lift posture correcting device, have released something to help runners create better form, too. Called Lumo Run, it's a wearables..
Richard Platt's insight:

Lumo, makers of the Lumo Lift posture correcting device, have released something to help runners create better form, too.

Called Lumo Run, it’s a wearables system consisting of Lumo “smart garments” – shorts for men and capris for women – and a device that fits inside the pocket of these garments that gives real-time feedback on an app to show the runner how they are performing with every strike of the heel.  Good form can not only increase a runner’s speed and distance, but it can also prevent injuries that could limit a runner’s ability to hit the pavement.   The Lumo Run embeds sensors and conductive thread into the waistband of the Lumo shorts or capris to detect a joggers biometrics, posture, and mileage and assist in real-time coaching. Using Lumo’s specialized algorithms, the device uses all that information to track and give feedback while on the jog so a runner can see how they are performing and make a correction in the moment.   There are plenty of apps out there to show a runner how far and how fast they’ve gone, but not much is available for runners who want to improve form and prevent injuries.  Athos  comes close as a wearable fitness startup in Silicon Valley with similar capris and shorts that can detect muscle strength and movement while you workout, but it’s not specifically for running. Will we always need to purchase the pants to get the benefits? Nike offered a similar device called the Nike+ that fit in specially made Nike brand shoes. It came with a bracelet instead of an app at the beginning but can now be found on smartphones everywhere. While the device initially needed to stay snug inside a pocket in the sole of the shoe, consumers eventually came up with accessories that would allow them to use the device on their own shoes instead of needing to purchase Nike’s proprietary shoe to make it work.  Lumo’s CEO Monisha Perkash emphasized the need to get the garments. “Having it placed on our waistband helps the sensor to be placed correctly and also be more stable,” she said. “And so the readings that you get are far more accurate.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from UX-UI-Wearable-Tech for Enhanced Human
Scoop.it!

Why are wearables for Women so Unwearable ?

Why are wearables for Women so Unwearable ? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

When it comes to wearables, women aren’t buying it–not what’s out there at least, according to a new study by Saatchi & Saatchi Wellness.


Fitbit, which had the third largest U.S. IPO of 2015, had a valuation of $4.1 billion but men accounted for 70% of those profits. The agency found that 95% of women are aware of wearable technology but only a third of them followed through with purchasing it.


Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

1. Wearables Creators Don’t Get the Meaning of “Wellness”:  

Contrary to what smartwatches like the Apple Watch and Fitbit advertise in targeted fitness ads, the study showed that women want a wellness app dealing with emotional, social and mental aspects. Only 12% of respondents ranked physical health as their definition of wellness, placing them a significant 64% below emotional benefits.

“Overwhelmingly, women recognize that there’s an interconnection between health and wellness but they’re very, very different,” Suchotliff says. “Health for women is something very concrete. It’s measurable. It’s ‘I have a cold’ or ‘I have an eye infection’ or ‘I’m overweight.’ It’s got specifics you can determine. Wellness is much more emotional and very personal.”   According to the study, women can’t relate to the current goal-setting wearables of today. “Women feel very intuitive and when they thought about setting goals, they thought about tracking,” says Suchotliff. “They didn’t want the kind of tracking that would remind them of any sort of barriers or not meeting their goals.”  Other aspects of wellness included a job change and making specific changes for wellness around the age of 40. Suchotliff says another was in relation to services of others meaning, “I’m going to make this change in my wellness because I want to make a better mother” or “When I’m well, my business thrives.”

2. There’s a Disconnect Between Form and Function:    The big players seem to be under the misconception that women will embrace their products as long as they’re glamorous–i.e. Google Glass bringing in Diane Von Furstenberg and Fitbit partnering with Tory Burch says Suchotliff.   The study found that 57% of respondents say while design and aesthetics play somewhat of a factor in their purchasing decisions it’s not the most important element–function is. Only 43% of respondents said aesthetics and design was the primary factor in their last major purchase of over $1,000.   “At the end of the day, it’s about value and overwhelmingly we heard that women don’t see the value of wearables out there now and it’s mainly because they’re not meeting women’s needs,” Suchotliff says. “Tech companies creating a fashionable wearable without an understanding of what women want out of health and wellness is ineffective.”   -  When women think about technology for wellness, the study showed that mobile and fitness-tracking were the first things that came to their minds. “Partly, I think because our mobile devices are attached to us but partly there’s two other elements,” she says. “One is that we cannot imagine the things that are not yet invented–women are not used to these devices being designed for them,”  


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

An Intel Curie-powered smart sports bra and more wearable tech at NYFW

An Intel Curie-powered smart sports bra and more wearable tech at NYFW | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
We know smart clothing is perfectly placed to monitor our bodies as we work out but what can it do with all that data? Sending it to your smartphone or computer isn't the only answer. This smart Aeros sports bra from Chromat is one example of wearable tech infiltrating the twice-yearly annual fashion weeks, which…
Richard Platt's insight:

We know smart clothing is perfectly placed to monitor our bodies as we work out but what can it do with all that data? Sending it to your smartphone or computer isn't the only answer.  This smart Aeros sports bra from Chromat is one example of wearable tech infiltrating the twice-yearly annual fashion weeks, which have kicked off in New York. Chromat is a New York based brand founded in 2010 by Becca McCharen and its smart bra tracks temperature, perspiration and stress levels; actually changing shape to support the wearer and optimise comfort.  The Lycra, mesh and neoprene bra uses shape memory alloy, smart metal which 'remembers' its original shape. Essentially, it transforms itself as and when you're hot and sweaty by opening and closing vents to cool you down or warm you up. This is a genuinely useful idea and one we hope moves into the mainstream quicker than some smart clothing ideas we've seen. Chromat's Aeros bra was debuted at MADE Fashion Week, part of New York Fashion Week, alongside the slightly wackier Adrenaline Dress which also uses biometric tracking to change its form.  The 3D printed, TPU and neoprene smart dress senses the wearer's adrenaline levels, like Anouk Wipprecht's protective smart dresses, and its carbon fibre framework expands into an architectural hourglass shape when stress levels rise. It's more showstopper than everyday dress clearly.   Both pieces of stylish smart clothing are powered by Intel's latest Curie module, aimed at designers, developers and makers and the focus of a wearable tech reality show airing in 2016.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Microsoft's Rumored Band 2 Could Have a Curved Display

Microsoft's Rumored Band 2 Could Have a Curved Display | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
As Microsoft's Oct. 6 press event approaches, rumors say that the company could be unveiling its next fitness wearable, the Band 2.
Richard Platt's insight:

Microsoft's Band fitness band could be getting a makeover with a new curved display and other improvements as the company prepares to unveil an assortment of new devices at its upcoming Oct. 6 press event.  Microsoft is expected to announce the sleeker, curved-display Microsoft Band 2 fitness band at the event, ushering in key changes for the Band line, according to a Sept. 21 article in Tech Times.   Several leaked images that were posted on the Internet showed a curved display that will better fit a wearer's wrist, along with a more modern appearance, the report stated. "The images also show what seems to be a metallic finish around the display, possibly to give the device a more premium look. It appears Microsoft has also decided to throw in a couple of buttons on the side of the display to help users navigate the device's elongated display more easily. The battery is also believed to have been moved from the sides of the display to underneath it."  The upcoming device will also reportedly gain the ability to track elevation, so that users can track stair climbing or walking or running up hills, the story said. The upcoming product will also reportedly be available in other countries outside the United States.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google hires ex-Amazon Lab126 engineers for Wearable tech initiative called 'Project Aura'

Google hires ex-Amazon Lab126 engineers for Wearable tech initiative called 'Project Aura' | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google is working on a new wearable technology effort known as Project Aura and is hiring consumer electronics experts from Amazon's secretive Lab126.
Richard Platt's insight:

Google is working on a new wearable technology effort known as Project Aura and is hiring consumer electronics experts from Amazon's secretive Lab126 to jump-start the new group.   Project Aura appears to have gotten started in June and is focused on reviving Google's troubled Glass computer eyeglasses, as well as accelerating Google's efforts to develop related wearable technology.

Project Aura will remain within Google rather than being a standalone company under the new Alphabet holding company or being folded into the Nest smart appliances business, a source familiar with the matter told Business Insider.  Nest CEO Tony Fadell will continue to have high-level oversight of the project, though it's unclear what will happen after Nest becomes a separate Alphabet company, the source said. Ivy Ross, a fashion industry veteran that Google hired to lead the Glass team in 2014, is heading up the Aura group.  Project Aura is not be be confused with Project Ara, Google's modular phone concept.

Amazon's Lab126 Experts are Now Google's:  Dima Svetlov, whose LinkedIn profile says he worked on Amazon's TV streaming stick, joined Aura as a software development manager in May. Amir Frenke joined in June as a director of software development. Tina Chen left Lab126 in August after working on its TV streaming box and smart-home assistant, Echo, and now works as Aura's manager of technical program management.  Lab126, which makes consumer devices like Amazon's Kindle e-readers, TV streaming products, and the ill-received Fire smartphonereportedly laid off dozens of engineers who had worked on the phone earlier this summer.  Svetlov, Frenke, and Chen, whose LinkedIn profiles don't reveal any details about Project Aura besides the description that it works on Glass "and beyond," are joining Apple veteran Max Ratner, who worked on the iPhone.

The project even has its own designated recruiter, Jessica Bailow, who has been focused on Aura since June, according to her LinkedIn profile. And Google recently posted several job openings for the Aura team, including a program manager for category development, an industrial designer and a UX designer.   Business Insider also recently reported that Adrian Wong, the former Google Glass lead electrical engineer, who had defected to Facebook-owned virtual-reality startup Oculus, quietly rejoined Google in June. His LinkedIn profile describes his new job only as "building blocks" for Alphabet/Google.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Sensor Opportunities in Wearable Tech

Sensor Opportunities in Wearable Tech | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Sensor Opportunities in Wearable Technology | Printed Electronics World
Richard Platt's insight:

This video provides an overview of the opportunities for sensors in wearable technologies. It is given by James Hayward, a Technology Analyst at IDTechEx Research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

A Critical Look at Gartner's Internet of Things

A Critical Look at Gartner's Internet of Things | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The end of the summer marks the return to school and a time to digest our favorite summer publication: the Gartner Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Chart. Every year I feel a bit confused about th
Richard Platt's insight:

So why should anyone care about this chart? Well I think when presented in aggregate it speaks volumes about what we aspire to develop over time regardless of industry reality and what we too easily dismiss.  For internet of things developers, we should take comfort in seeing that the industry has been growing and that even if the terminology is getting muddled, it's been here to stay for some time. Where it sits on the chart doesn't matter, it's the fact that it's there at all, in multiple guises, its success and growth hiding in plain sight.

more...
Thierry Evangelista's comment, September 18, 2015 10:00 AM
Beyond IoT, it's always interesting to have a look back in the mirror and evaluate analysts reports 'a posteriori'.
Richard Platt's comment, September 18, 2015 10:14 AM
It can be an useful analysis
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Things comes to the NFL

The Internet of Things comes to the NFL | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Every NFL player and stadium will be equipped with RFID sensors and receivers, respectively, this football season, allowing the league to track fine-grained location data for every play.
Richard Platt's insight:

On Thursday, the defending Superbowl XLIX champion New England Patriots hosted the Pittsburgh Steelers opening the 2015 football season, each player will be equipped with a set of RFID sensors about the size of a quarter embedded in his shoulder pads, each emitting unique radio frequencies. Gillette Stadium (and every other stadium used by the NFL) has been equipped with 20 receivers to pick up those radio frequencies and pinpoint every player's field position, speed, distance traveled and acceleration in real time.   By using two sensors for each player — one embedded in the left shoulder pad and one on the right — the system will also be able to identify the facing of each player.   The NFL plans to use the data generated to power the NFL 2015 app for Xbox One and Windows 10, allowing for things like "Next Gen Replay" that will allow fans to call up stats for each player tied into highlight clips posted on the app. But that's just the beginning. The data will be fed to broadcasters, leveraged for in-stadium displays and provided to coaching staff and players.  "We've always had these traditional NFL stats," says Matt Swensson, senior director of Emerging Products and Technology at the NFL. "The league has been very interested in trying to broaden that and bring new statistics to the fans. Along the way, there's been more realization about how the data can be leveraged to make workflow more efficient around the game."   "This type of initiative really opens the doors to do more things at the venue," Swensson adds. "At the Pro Bowl last year, we had a display up that showed what players were on the field. By putting up what players were on the field in real time, it really gave fans more information."  Lincolnshire, Ill.-based Zebra Technologies is the NFL's technology partner in its IoT push. Founded in 1969, Zebra built its name on manufacturing and selling marking, tracking and printing technologies ranging from thermal barcode label and receipt printers, RFID smart label printer/encoders and card and kiosk printers. Beginning in 2013, it began pivoting into IoT and machine to machine (M2M) applications with the launch of its Zatar software platform. In the same year, it launched its MotionWorks Sports Solution, which powers the NFL initiative.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Fossil acquires wearables company Misfit for $260 million

Fossil acquires wearables company Misfit for $260 million | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Fossil Group acquires wearable fitness maker Misfit at $260 million, marking the second big union between a watchmaker and Silicon Valley.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Android Wear can do a whole lot more using your wrist

Android Wear can do a whole lot more using your wrist | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The new version of Android Wear has support for many more wrist gestures... although you're going to look silly doing them.
Richard Platt's insight:

That big Android Wear update isn't just about allowing cellular data on smartwatches -- it's also really helpful if you don't have a hand free. Google has quietly revealed that Android Wear 1.4 has a ton of new wrist gestures beyond the usual flicks to navigate cards. You can take action on a card by pushing your arm down, for instance, or go back to your watch face by wriggling your wrist. You're probably going to look silly if you use nothing but wrist gestures, but this beats dropping a bag (or freezing your hands) just to touch your watch for a brief moment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The U.S. Consumer Wearables Market Will Reach $9.7B by 2019, Says Compass Intelligence

The U.S. Consumer Wearables Market Will Reach $9.7B by 2019, Says Compass Intelligence | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
SAN ANTONIO, TX--(Marketwired - October 20, 2015) - Compass Intelligence (www.compassintelligence.com), a market analytics and consulting firm specializing in metrics-driven intelligence and insights, has released a series of wearable technology studies highlighting various aspects of the consumer wearables market within its “Emerging Technologies” research track. The reports combine market size...
Richard Platt's insight:

Within the U.S. market, revenues from the sale of wearable devices are expected to reach $9.7 billion by 2019. Revenue growth in this market is largely driven by rising adoption of smart watches, as well as higher-end wrist band and fitness devices. Key findings of the study include:

a) Adoption of wearable technology continues to gain momentum as nearly 30% of U.S. consumers now own/use such devices.

b) Fitness and health tracking devices including bands and smart watches remain the most popular among consumers.

c) While consumers perceive various benefits from using wearable devices, nearly 60% of those surveyed by Compass Intelligence perceive wearable devices as “too expensive.”

d) An overwhelming majority of those surveyed also stated their desire to have some homogeneity between wearable device and smartphone interfaces.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Garmin Tips 3 New Forerunner Running Watches

Garmin Tips 3 New Forerunner Running Watches | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Three new GPS running watches, compatible with the updated Garmin Connect Mobile app, will launch later this year.
Richard Platt's insight:

Garmin today announced a handful of new products for everyone from treadmill trainers to regular marathoners.  The satellite navigation firm later this year will launch three new GPS running watches, compatible with the updated Garmin Connect Mobile app 

Set to ship in Q4 the Forerunner 230 and 235 track distance, pace, time, steps, calories, and sleep, as well as heart rate. But while the 230 must be paired with a chest strap to monitor your pulse, the 235 features Garmin Elevate wrist heart rate technology.

Connect the watch with your smartphone to receive notifications, control music, and hear audio prompts announcing lap times.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Mobile Payments and Mobile Wallets
Scoop.it!

Swatch takes the wraps off its mobile payments watch

Swatch takes the wraps off its mobile payments watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Swatch has revealed that it's working on a mobile payments watch that it'll launch in partnership with banks in China. Bloomberg reports that the timepiece will...

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
Richard Platt's insight:

Swatch has revealed that it's working on a mobile payments watch that it'll launch in partnership with banks in China. Bloomberg reports that the timepiece will let users make purchases at point-of-sale machines in stores, thanks to an NFC chip that's embedded beneath the dial. The device, named Swatch Bellamy, will launch in January 2016 in the country, priced at 580 yuan ($91), with releases in Europe and the US coming afterward. Unfortunately, we're not sure too many people are going to be camping out days ahead of time to buy a bargain-basement fashion watch with an NFC chip inside. After all, you could buy a regular watch now and just grab an NFC sticker from any bank that offers them to its users.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Curved new MSFT Band blends sensor-laden hardware with cloud-based smarts

Curved new MSFT Band blends sensor-laden hardware with cloud-based smarts | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Microsoft revealed the new Microsoft Band at its Tuesday hardware event, and it intertwines hardware and software.
Richard Platt's insight:

The new Band is “optimized for the individual who goes to work and works out,” said Microsoft’s Lindsey Matese.   The most notable fresh feature is the Band’s curved Gorilla Glass 3 display, which hugs your wrist in a much more eye-pleasing fashion than its predecessor. Plus, it’s more scratch-resistant and more responsive to touch commands, and the Band’s band breathes easier around your wrist.   “We kept grinding to push the product... no rigidity in any direction, no uncomfortable shoulders, no hard edges, and above all it must curve nicely around the wrist,” said Matese.  Beyond the aesthetic upgrade, the new Microsoft Band now features enhanced Cortana integration—the digital assistant can now reschedule workouts that you miss—as well as a new barometer sensor so you can track your elevation in real time.  So why would you opt for a Microsoft Band over, say, an Apple Watch or Fitbit? Matese repeatedly stressed the personalized “big data” that the Microsoft Health app provides, especially when paired with the sensor-laden Band. Calorie tracking, stair climbing, GPS, guided workouts, sleep tracking, calorie tracking, notifications—Microsoft’s blend of the Band hardware and the cloud-bolstered Health app software does it all, Matese said. And the combo enables capabilities that no other fitness wearable offers, she said, such as measuring VO2 max (the maximum oxygen volume an athlete can use) and the ability to discern whether you’re practicing your golf swings or crushing long balls down the fairway.   Curious? You’ll be able to preorder the new Microsoft Band for $250 today

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Finalists from UNICEF selected in Global ‘Wearables for Good’ Design Challenge to Transform Children’s Lives

Finalists from UNICEF selected in Global ‘Wearables for Good’ Design Challenge to Transform Children’s Lives | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
#WearablesForGood design challenge set by UNICEF, ARM and frog attracts 250 entries from 46 countries across the world
Richard Platt's insight:

The completed projects will be submitted in October, with the two winners announced in November at a tech event in Helsinki, Finland and ARM TechCon (Santa Clara, US). The winners will each receive a prize of $15,000, along with incubation and mentoring from UNICEF, ARM and Frog Design.  The finalists are:

  • CommunicAID, U.S: a bracelet that tracks medication treatment
  • Droplet, U.S: a wrist-worn wearable water purification device
  • Guard Band, Vietnam: a wristband that helps protect children from abuse
  • Khushi Baby, India and U.S: a necklace-type wearable to track child immunization in the first two years of life
  • Raksh, India: a device worn in the ear to track a child’s respiration rate, heart rate, body temperature and relative breath humidity designed by a team of university students
  • Soapen, India and U.S.: an interactive crayon-like device that encourages hand washing among young children
  • Telescrypts, East Africa and U.S: a wearable device to take patients’ vitals and send the data to health care workers
  • TermoTell, Nigeria and U.S: a bracelet used to monitor and analyze a child’s temperature in real-time in order to save the lives of children at risk of malaria
  • Totem Open Health Patch, Netherlands: a small sensor-based device that is part of a wider Totem Open Health system for wearable health technology
  • WAAA!, U.K.: A sensor-based neonatal health surveillance tool.

Erica Kochi, co-lead and co-founder of Unicef Innovation said: "The ideas from the 10 finalists demonstrate how wearable technology can be applied in resource-constrained environments, creating viable business opportunities for the technology sector in developing markets. We’re excited to review the finalists’ refined ideas over the coming months to pick two that have the potential to improve the lives of women and children at a national or global scale."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Overview of the Smartwatch Industry

Overview of the Smartwatch Industry | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:
Market size: 40 companies have launched smartwatches in 2013. They jointly sold around 3,1 million units, generating a market volume of 700 million USD. The Top 10 companies have a market share of 82%.  Next to products which are already on the market, around 150 companies have smartwatches in their development pipeline. Besides this, hundreds of scientific institutions are experimenting with smartwatch technologies, and a big number of tech providers in the area of sensors, displays, etc is working on specific solutions for tomorrow’s smartwatch industry.  A central part of the value of smartwatches is made up by software and applications. There are currently around 20,000 smartwatch app developers in the world. Even if this represents only a few percent compared to smartphone app developers, the number is growing exponentially based on available smartwatches with suitable open-source interfaces.  Target segments of smartwatches:  While the product benefit of today’s typical smartwatches is relatively low, a successful product category has evolved in the last few years: fitness trackers. Companies such as FitbitJawbone, and Nike sold millions of them in 2013. As they are starting to be equipped with displays, the latest fitness trackers can be considered smartwatches (see  definition).  While only around 1/5th of current smartwatches are targeted at health and fitness purposes, this segment made up 1/2 of all units sold in 2013. If all fitness trackers would be considered – not just the ones considered smartwatches – this relation would be even more extreme.  Tracking of physiological parameters is clearly the driver of the smartwatch industry. Many highly relevant applications will evolve out of this. However, the different market segments are quickly growing together. While “conventional” smartwatches integrate more and more physiological sensors, the fitness trackers start to include notifications.

Characteristics of today’s smartwatches: In terms of technology used, around 90% of today’s smartwatches are “companion devices”, meaning that they need the user’s smartwatch to connect to the Internet. In terms of connection between smartphone and smartwatch, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has clearly made the race. Other protocols such as ANT, NFC, WiFi, or ZigBee are close to irrelevant. Some products combine BLE with conventional Bluetooth, in order to reach the needed bandwidth for audio applications.  What about standalone smartwatches with integrated mobile phone technology? While some people believe that this will be needed to make smartwatches a success, Smartwatch Group only believes that this makes sense for certain applications such as security (see Limmex and Filip). In most other cases, it makes sense to use the mobile phone as a hub: First, this device is around you almost all the time. Second, integrating BLE instead of a mobile phone technology into a smartwatch is much simpler and cheaper. Third, one mobile phone subscription is enough, reducing recurring costs.  In terms of pricing, an average smartwatch sold in 2013 cost USD $225.-. Pricing is still very much hardware-based, with a one-time upfront payment. However, recurring pricing schemes as well as payments for apps will become standard over the coming years, together with bigger price differentiation as product design becomes more sophisticated.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

How Wearable Tech Could Spark A New Privacy Revolution

How Wearable Tech Could Spark A New Privacy Revolution | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Fears over privacy are nothing new. As users began to see the sheer availability of information online, and the amount of personal data being seen and used by..
Richard Platt's insight:

Fears over privacy are nothing new. As users began to see the sheer availability of information online, and the amount of personal data being seen and used by tech companies, they became rightly concerned over how much information would be available to companies and individuals, and how that information would be used. The increasing stream of news about the scope and intensity of government-backed surveillance programs has only added to the paranoia.  As we enter a new era of technology marked by wearable devices like the Apple Watch and Google Glass, those fears — which have been simmering in the minds of consumers for years — may finally begin to boil over.  The Problem With Apps. When it comes to user privacy, there are two kinds of apps to worry about. The first kind is designed to gather information about a user. For example, social media apps go out of their way to draw as much information about their users as possible. This is advantageous for both users and companies — users get more involved with their networks, and companies get more information to sell to advertisers.

However, this can be concerning to users who do not wish their information to be sold or to be publicly available. The same is true for tracking-style apps like Xora, an app whose deletion prompted the recent firing of an employee who resented the idea of being tracked 24/7.  The second kind may seem counterintuitive: apps dedicated to preserving user privacy. Snapchat, an app supposedly dedicated to anonymity and user-data protection, was recently the victim of multiple information leaks. These types of apps are dangerous because they lull users into a sometimes-false sense of security, prompting them to allow more of their information to be used without realizing the finer details of each company’s unique privacy policy.

But the real problem with apps is in their nature. Because they’re installed on a device, and often running in the background, they can constantly draw in new information about a user. Compare this to a few generations back, when the Internet could only be accessed through a hard-wired machine for specific, designated periods of time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Dark Energy brings Wearable Tech to Hunting

Dark Energy brings Wearable Tech to Hunting | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Dark Energy, the Provo-based hunting gear startup, is betting that hunters want wearable tech.  Currently, hunters are using archaic technology like handheld gps and flashlights, said Garrett Aida, the company’s CEO, who sees an opportunity to bring better technology to the hunting market.   Their first product, the Poseidon, is a military grade power source and light. What sets it apart from other outdoor products, is that Poseidon is drop proof, crush proof, 100 percent waterproof and 100% dust proof, Aida said.  “I’m wondering why no one has stepped in to make the entire experience more fun, easier and less burdensome,” Aida said. “There are so many things to carry. It’s extremely technical. Anything you can do to make the experience more seamless where you can connect with nature, that would be something that would be super rewarding for me and for other hunters.”   Aida tested his theory and completed two Kickstarters, the Poseidon and an energy reservoir, which raised over $270,000 on the platform.  The company has plans to replace old tools for communication, location, power, light and surveillance with new smaller and higher tech gear.   The Poseidon will be available online and in Cabela’s and Bass Pro for $119.

While the product promises big things, the company found manufacturing to be more difficult than they anticipated, Aida said. With their manufacturing in China, it has taken more time to get the product up to standards and be compact in order to compete in the market. But while it’s taken time, the company has found ways to make it happen and don’t plan on sharing how they did it.

“Being able to put everything we need into the product into a small package, that’s part of our IP,” Aida said.   Dark Energy is betting that hunting is a big market for wearable technology, and they plan on being the first ones there.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google Is Assembling a Secret Team to Work on Google Glass

Google Is Assembling a Secret Team to Work on Google Glass | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It'll work on other wearables too
Richard Platt's insight:

After the first version of Google Glass failed to take off the way the company hoped, it recently stopped selling the $1,500 model and reassigned the team under Tony Fadell, co-founder and CEO of connected home device company Nest, which Google acquired last year. Google recently announced the formation of a parent company, Alphabet, under which divisions like Google (its ads business, search unit, Android, and related products’ home), Nest, and Google X will be housed. Project Aura will remain as part of the Google unit, while Fadell will head Nest, according to a Business Insider source. It’s unclear how the relationship will function.  

The new team will also likely explore virtual reality, an emerging technology that companies like Facebook and Samsung have been working on. However, it’s not clear it will focus on virtual reality.   In recent months, Google’s been rumored to be working on an upcoming enterprise-focused version of Glass, an area of applications the original version found more success than among consumers. Italian luxury eyewear company Luxottica’s CEO also revealed recently that it’s been tapped to work on an upcoming version of the eyewear product.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Tech Report - Haptics 2016-2026: Technologies, Markets and Players

Tech Report - Haptics 2016-2026: Technologies, Markets and Players | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Haptics 2016-2026: Technologies, Markets and Players: IDTechEx
Richard Platt's insight:

Worth a gander if you do technology development / new product development in this space of wearables and feedback mechanisms on flat screens.

more...
No comment yet.