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HC1 Headset Computer - Motorola Solutions USA

HC1 Headset Computer - Motorola Solutions USA | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
With the Motorola HC1 Headset Computer, empower your workforce with hands-free mobility. Explore now
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This is one wearable technology that I AM NOT going to wear

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This Wearable Tech Could Keep Teens Out of Jail

This Wearable Tech Could Keep Teens Out of Jail | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is attempting to change that with the help of Kentucky-based Corrisoft’s AIR wearable tech.
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Teenage offenders in New York City whose families cannot afford to pay bail likely go to prison to await a trial. But the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is attempting to change that with the help of Kentucky-based Corrisoft’s AIR (Alternative to Incarceration via Rehabilitation) technology.   AIR consists of an ankle bracelet with a Bluetooth chip that tethers it to a smartphone. Traditional GPS bracelets operate on a 2G or 3G network, but using the GPS on a smartphone allows the information to be translated over a 4G network, improving the speed, accuracy and volume of information.

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office will test that approach with a pilot program set to launch in September. Offenders between the ages of 16 and 18 that committed certain felonies will be eligible for the program. The ultimate goal is to keep teenagers that have committed a crime from being subjected to the violence of Riker’s Island, according to the New York Times.  The smartphone technology does more than just track the offender; it also allows for real-time communication with the user.

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Microchip, Intel work together on security for IoT devices

Microchip, Intel work together on security for IoT devices | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Using Intel technology, Microchip will now be able to offer enhanced security and privacy for Internet of Things networks and devices.
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Microchip Technology Inc. and Intel Corp. are collaborating to enhance privacy and security in “Internet of Things” products.
Microchip, the Chandler, AZ -based semiconductor maker, is licensing Intel’s Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID) software for its products, said Bill Swanson, Microchip’s senior product marketing manager for the company’s Computing Products Group.  “This solves two issues: one being security or authenticating, and the second is being able to have privacy in the data," he said.  Intel EPID is a "sophisticated, proven approach" to device authentication that provides both security and privacy for the on-ramp to the Internet of Things, Swanson said.
A demonstration of the Intel EPID Protocol running on Microchip’s Internet of Things security platform was exhibited at the recent Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco.  Microchip has a large presence in connected devices, and with the Intel software it will now be able to add authentication and anonymity to its customers.

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​Wearable tech heart rate tracking is 'incredibly accurate'

​Wearable tech heart rate tracking is 'incredibly accurate' | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wrist-based heart rate monitors get a bad rap, especially when it comes to the new wave of devices from the likes of Fitbit, Mio and Apple. But Professor Greg Whyte has told Wareable that, in reality, the criticism levelled at wearable and heart rate tracking accuracy is unfair. And while it should be noted that…
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Wrist-based heart rate monitors get a bad rap, especially when it comes to the new wave of devices from the likes of Fitbit, Mio and Apple.  But Professor Greg Whyte has told Wareable that, in reality, the criticism levelled at wearable and heart rate tracking accuracy is unfair. And while it should be noted that he's an ambassador for Fitbit, Whyte is a highly respected sports performance scientist, a former Olympic athlete and leads the Centre for Human Health & Performance at Harley Street in London – so he has little to gain by spouting any propaganda in his field.   "It's very easy to knock wearable tech by saying it's not accurate," he told us in an interview at his lab. "There is a lot of noise on them, but actually there is a lot of noise created by humans – particularly during exercise,"  Whyte has seen first hand the differences between the data from top scientific tech and consumer grade wearables. And somewhat surprisingly, he gives the likes of the Fitbit Surge and Apple Watch a glowing bill of health.   "For what they are and what they do, wearable tech is incredibly accurate. The signal to noise is such that the data we're getting is quite good."  -  But what do you do if you notice that over the last week your heart rate has gone up? Well, by taking it in the morning Whyte says you can rule out food or drink, and it's time to start watching other parts of your life.   "Changes in waking heart rate is unlikely to be anything to do with diet or caffeine. It's a global assessment of your physical state. If your heart rate is up by a significant amount, what could the cause be?"  "If you've been drinking heavily the night before then you know why. If you have had a very poor night's sleep because a of a host of reasons like noise etc, than that could be a cause – and then it might be an issue with your 'sleep hygiene' so your blackouts aren't good, you haven't got the right bed, the right linen. It could be that you're in the middle of exams, buying a house, something stressful in life.   "Use it as a starting point, identify what it could be and then address the issues."

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Apple Watch Grabs Nearly 20% of Wearables Market

Apple Watch Grabs Nearly 20% of Wearables Market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Total shipment volume for the quarter came to 18.1 million units, up 223.2 percent from the 5.6 million units shipped in the second quarter of 2014.
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Apple finds itself within striking distance of the established market leader, Fitbit, in its first appearance in the wearables market, according to a report from IT research firm IDC.  Apple shipped a total of 3.6 million units of its smartwatch, called Apple Watch, in the second quarter of 2015, just 0.8 million units behind Fitbit's 4.4 million units.   Total shipment volume for the quarter came to 18.1 million units, up 223.2 percent from the 5.6 million units shipped in the second quarter of 2014.  "On a scale from 1 to 10, Apple’s participation is an 11. Without a doubt, Apple brings so much to the wearables industry for reasons mentioned in the report," Ramon Llamas, research manager for wearables and mobile phones at IDC, told eWEEK. "In a way, Apple is one of the silver bullets for the success of the overall market. Now that Apple is in the wearables market, as an analyst, I want to see it thrive by developing the product and the service. That will entice more customers, raise the bar for the competition, and get the attention of end-users."   The report noted a divide has formed between smart wearables and basic wearables--devices that do not run third-party applications, and includes most fitness trackers.    -  Price and functionality are the main differences between the two categories, and that gap is expected to widen over time, with the challenge for basic wearables manufacturers trying to compete with the additional features offered by smart wearables while still turning a profit in the price sensitive basic wearables market.

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Why the smartwatch will lead to better software

Why the smartwatch will lead to better software | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The reviews are out on the Apple Watch: It’s a great idea that has yet to meet its full potential. Despite gold-plated designs and brand cachet, this year’s most coveted wearable is still falling short.
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Software is the key to the Apple Watch’s mainstream adoptability.

The onus is on developers to get it right — and so far, many haven’t. It takes more than a shrunken phone app to meet the demands of the smartwatch wearer. As Tumblr cofounder Marco Arment put it, “I originally designed [my] Apple Watch app … with a scaled-down version of the iPhone’s app structure. This seemed like a sensible adaptation of my iOS app to the Apple Watch. In practice, it sucked.”

The newest generation of successful apps aren’t representative of the last. In order to succeed, smartwatch apps must act as extensions of our own internal processes. That level of refinement, in turn, will up the quality of apps on every device.   A new device? Not quite:  The smartwatch isn’t something people carry in their satchels. It’s an extension of the wearer. The watch removes almost every barrier between self and machine. Users won’t tolerate noise on their wrists. They must trust the watch to add value to their lives with every interaction.   -  Smartphone apps in miniature won’t accomplish that, even though the App Store for Apple Watch is full of them. Of the 3,500+ Apple Watch apps in existence today, most will never see the light of profitability. Only 10 apps can appear on the Apple Watch’s selection screen at a time. This heightens the app Darwinism that we’ve been recently seeing on the smartphone and tablet — and it forces app developers to adapt the way they create.    A personal assistant on the wrist:  Techies have been talking about the next digital personal assistant for decades. From Blackberries to robot housekeepers, each device is touted to hit that next level of intelligence. The smartwatch is the latest iteration of this meme, and rightfully so—nobody will tolerate a screaming commercial on their wrist. Every feature on a smartwatch app must be intelligent and adaptable enough to make life easier, every time. Apps that complicate or intrude will quickly be forgotten:   This forces smartwatch app developers to put in more strategic thinking upfront. Getting a user’s attention once is easy. Getting it time and time again, on a device connected to the skin, is an art.    Thinking differently about app development:  The current mentality around app creation harkens back to the days, not so long ago, when mobile app development was like a virtual gold rush. Firms would find a reason to create an app, put it together, test, and iterate until users were happy with it.   -  This approach continues to work in the wearables era, but with far less margin for error. Developers must get it 95% right the first time, because users will quickly delete an app that interferes with their daily routines. The most successful apps will work well with voice control, integrate with sensorsm and employ machine learning to personalize communications and customize alerts. This must happen succinctly and on every screen size.

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Wearable technology drives aerospace efficiency and productivity

Wearable technology drives aerospace efficiency and productivity | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Seventy-two million wearable devices will be shipped this year, up a 173 percent from 26.4 million units shipped in 2014, according to International Data Corporation (IDC) analysts in Framingham, Mass., in the company’s Worldwide Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker. 
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“Wearable smart glasses are being used for airplane manufacturing applications. Quality and field service are other functional areas where smart glasses can be used. Potential use cases involve processes that are time-consuming and error-prone, and that involve complicated assembly procedures,” Schmidt says. “Smart glasses can be a catalytic tool to accelerate the industry’s momentum toward being completely digital – from both a business and technology perspective.   “Wearables can be a game changer especially because they are instrumental in taking the industry to where it is going on a massive scale: to an all-digital mindset all the time,”   -  Armed with the wearable electronics technology, personnel marked all aircraft seat locations down to the last millimeter, as well as checked for accuracy and quality. For Airbus, time spent per aircraft was divided by six, error rate reduced to zero, and marking operations revalued.

“This proof of concept shows how wearable technologies offer new and important benefits in the aerospace and defense industry,” Schmidt says. The project was launched in January 2015, and the first prototype was completed less than a month later. To accelerate the timeline, Airbus and Accenture worked in start-up mode, enabling rapid iterations by engineers at both companies. The technology is currently being industrialized for cabin furnishing on the Airbus A330 wide-body jet airliner. The airframe manufacturer’s other final assembly lines should quickly follow, as well as other Airbus divisions, such as Airbus Defense and Space.

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Nymi wristband tackles growing wearables market with security bracelet

Nymi wristband tackles growing wearables market with security bracelet | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Strapping your wallet, house keys and a database of passwords onto your wrist would make life a lot easier, and one Canadian company has created a way to link all of that information with an extra level of security tied to your heartbeat.
Richard Platt's insight:

Honestly I think this technology should get "co-opted" by a "Clever Watch" or even savvy enough "smartwatch" manufacturer (note that the tech it is more than an bloody app), so that the technology is integrated into your normal day to day timepiece.

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Intel Corporation Smart Bracelet Demonstrates the Power of Wearable’s Technology

Intel Corporation Smart Bracelet Demonstrates the Power of Wearable’s Technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
In the future, your computer will be able to identify you by leveraging the bracelet you wear. Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is very
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This Intel prototype has a different mechanism using an existing password system a feature that is attractive to potential enterprise users.   At the Intel event, an Intel developer could unlock her computer screen just by going towards the computer when having a bracelet on which was carrying authentication data. When she moved away the computer’s lock screen appeared again. A good question is what if others got hold of the bracelet? As it is linked to a particular person’s identity, the bracelet will not unlock the computer/laptop when another person wears it. This is a smart way of utilizing wearable technology that takes the burden off people to recall yet one more password combined with enterprise-grade security.  There are no concrete plans to make this bracelet commercial. However, it is a good example of how smart devices can help in daily life. Intel is also currently working with Microsoft in a partnership termed Wake-On-Voice whose goal is to let users be able to wake up computers and other devices containing Intel chips just by speaking.  -  My argument against this approach that Intel is currently pursuing is that "clever watches" (note not smartwatches) should be the devices incorporating / embedding this technology for people to use and take advantage of it's value, right now it's just an invention, not an innovation unless it's adopted by the market at large.

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Martian’s New Smartwatch Hides The Power Inside An Unassuming Package

Martian’s New Smartwatch Hides The Power Inside An Unassuming Package | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Martian Voice Communicator tries hard make you think it's not a smartwatch. The model I tested, a black faux diver with a non-working bezel and quartz..
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The company has been making smartwatches since the dawn of the wearable revolution. Originally a solid competitor to Pebble, Martian has slowly moved into a position of power in the “I want a watch that looks like a watch” camp. By offering what are essentially slightly thicker quartz watches, they succeed consistently at this goal.

What can this new model do? Priced at $299 the watches basically offer OLED notifications in a little window under the face and a discrete speaker and microphone that lets you communicate with iOS or Android. That’s it. There are no step trackers nor are there any apps. It’s basically a little praetorian guard on your wrists that reminds you that you are mortal and that you can look up zero divided by zero via Siri’s voice control.

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Intel Meshes Tokenization, NFC And Wearable Tech For Enterprise

Intel Meshes Tokenization, NFC And Wearable Tech For Enterprise | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Intel announces a new wearable bracelet for enterprise users.
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Intel’s new product, which was unveiled at the Intel Developer Forum on Tuesday (Aug. 18), does not appear yet to have a name.  Intel CEO Brian Krzanich offered demonstrations of the bracelet, which requires an employee to authenticate the device and reauthenticate it if it is taken off and put back on again, through the use of a password. But reports noted that the wearable technology negates employees’ need to wait for a computer to boot up and enter a password to access the device.   It’s a new take on tokenization that not only wakes up a computer when the bracelet is near but allows the wearer to quickly authenticate themselves to gain access to that computer.

According to reports, the unveiling of the bracelet coincided with the release of several new software development tools and hardware designs aimed at enterprise users and at boosting Intel’s development of wearable workplace technology. The bracelet follows Intel’s recent partnership with Microsoft that has created the Wake-On-Voice initiative, a technology that lets users activate their computers or other mobile devices using Intel technology by voice activation.

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Wrap Your Mind Around Smartwatches with Flexible Touch Screens

Wrap Your Mind Around Smartwatches with Flexible Touch Screens | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Polyera Wove Band is a smartwatch with the first-ever flexible touch screen destined for consumer use.
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The Polyera Wove Band is a smartwatch with the first-ever bendable digital screen destined for consumer use. But before your inner skeptic starts freaking out, let’s look at the technology first.  Digital screens work through two layers. The frontplane displays the images while the backplane has all the electronics that control the frontplane. The frontplane OLED and E-ink screens can already be bent but it’s the backplane that’s condemned to stiffness.  To make truly bendable backplanes, Polyera developed proprietary materials to do the job. What these are, no one but them knows. The startup, which celebrates its 10th year of research this month, calls the groundbreaking technology Digital Fabric.  The first images of the smartwatch are just impressive. The Polyera Wove Band doesn’t look like anything available today. A touchscreen E-ink display, like those in Pebble watches, occupies about 75% of the product’s outward-facing surface area.  Screen size sets a crucial limit to smartwatch functionality. It’s hard to interact with a screen narrower than three fingers. You’ll look like you’re wearing a small bowl on your wrist if they’re made too big. If the human wrist is around seven inches, that’s about five inches of screen length on the Wove—game-changing for a wearable.

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Wafer-thin material heralds future of wearable technology

Wafer-thin material heralds future of wearable technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

UOW's Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM) has successfully pioneered a way to construct a flexible, foldable and lightweight energy storage device that provides the building blocks for next-generation batteries needed to power wearable electronics and implantable medical devices.

The conundrum researchers have faced in developing miniature energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, has been figuring out how to increase the surface area of the device, to store more charge, without making it larger.


"Among all modern electronic devices, portable electronics are some of the most exciting," ISEM PhD student Monirul Islam said. "But the biggest challenge is to charge storage in a small volume as well as being able to deliver that charge quickly on demand."...


Via Jeff Domansky
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The conundrum researchers have faced in developing miniature energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, has been figuring out how to increase the surface area of the device, to store more charge, without making it larger.   "Among all modern electronic devices, portable electronics are some of the most exciting," ISEM PhD student Monirul Islam said. "But the biggest challenge is to charge storage in a small volume as well as being able to deliver that charge quickly on demand."  To solve this problem, a team of PhD students, led by Dr Konstantin Konstantinov under the patronage of ISEM Director Professor Shi Xue Dou and with the support of Professor Hua Kun Liu, the head of ISEM Energy Storage Division, have developed a three-dimensional structure using a flat-pack self-assembly of three components: graphene, a conductive polymer and carbon nanotubes, which are atom-thick lattice-like networks of carbon formed into cylinders.   -  The so-called wonder material graphene, made from single atom-thick layers of graphite, was a suitable candidate due its electronic performance and mechanical strength.   "We knew in theory that if you can make a sort of carbon skeleton you have a greater surface area and greater surface area means more charge," Dr Konstantinov said. "If we could efficiently separate the layers of carbon we could then use both surfaces of each layer for charge accumulation. The problem we faced was that fabricating these 3D shapes in practice, not just theory, is a challenging, if not impossible task."  The solution was to flat-pack the components by building the 3D shape layer-by-layer, much like a miniature exercise in cake decoration. The graphene in liquid form was mixed with the conductive polymer and reduced to solid and the carbon nanotubes carefully inserted between the graphene layers to form a self-assembled flat-packed, wafer-thin supercapacitor material.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 24, 10:15 PM

New materials provide potential for many new wearable technology applications.

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Ralph Lauren to Sell Wearable-Tech Shirt Timed for U.S Open

Ralph Lauren to Sell Wearable-Tech Shirt Timed for U.S Open | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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The Ralph Lauren smart shirt features a mobile app that will sync data from the PoloTech Shirt. And Lauren said a smart suit was not out of the realm of possibilities. Now at least the shirt does not integrate into other health applications.  -  The shirts are now designed for men, but according to David Lauren, the executive VP for advertising and marketing, he claims that women’s smart shirts are on their way.

Silver fibers woven directly into the shirt’s fabric allow for accurate readings of stats such as heart rate and variability, breathing depth and recovery, intensity of movement, energy output and stress levels, steps taken and calories burned.  -  A “black box” that collects and processes the information uses five connectors and contains a 3D accelerometer that captures the intensity of movement based on three g-force measurements.  -  The goal of the shirt is essential to show users an analysis of their workouts, after which the app will offer suggestions on their workout. The Company’s Retail company, representing approximately 51% of the Company’s fiscal 2014 net earnings, consists of sales made directly to consumers through its retail stores across the world; through concession-based shop-within-shops located mainly in Asia, Australia and Europe; and through the Firm’s retail e-commerce channel in North America, Europe and Asia. The company is working on making more casual connected apparel – such a polo shirt that could be worn all day, not just during exercise.

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Study Reveals Wearable Market Will Further Diversify

Study Reveals Wearable Market Will Further Diversify | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable devices are a becoming a big part of today's society, with more gadgets being released almost every day the wearable market as a whole has thoroug
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In the released paper, Tractica takes into consideration 10 key trends that the whole wearable market has been having considerable progress. The main key component in the list is how wearable technologies have diversified so much that a single market can no longer describe all the gadgets that might be included in it, as wearables are no longer constituted exclusively of smartwatches and fitness trackers; wearable devices’ developers are exploring beyond those two areas, reaching strong innovation points which lead to new types of devices, a great example of this are the relatively new “hearables“. Another important aspect that has faced a significant growth, is that Google and Apple are not the only companies that have created their own wearable operating system, as new startups have adventured and designed their own operating systems exclusively for their wearable device in order to give the user the best experience possible.  Tractica is quite certain that the current growth of the wearable market will lead to an even greater diversification into different segments, dividing the market into at least 6 wearable categories, including smartwatches, smart clothing, smart glasses, body sensors, and wearable cameras.The wearables market is a collection of micro trends within each device segment, application area, and world region,” noted Aditya Kaul, Research Director at Tractica.

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Market Analysis: Under Armour Enters the Wearable Technology Market

Market Analysis: Under Armour Enters the Wearable Technology Market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Wearable technology sector, has been expanding rapidly and still has a strong potential for growth. The boom of wearable technology has primarily deriv
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Under Armour’s Competitive Advantage:  One company that has slipped under the radar is Under Armour, who has recently entered the wearable technology market by announcing that they will collaborate with HTC to release their own wearable device the ‘Grip Fitness Brand’ later this year. Under Armour has recently made tactical purchases of heath and fitness apps, spending $710 million acquiring platforms such as MyFitnessPal, MapMyFitness and Endomondo. The company now controls the world’s largest digital health and fitness community, at 140 million.  Although companies such as Google and Apple have a large advantage when it comes to data collection and usage, they lack the fitness society that Under Armour’s fitness brands such as MyFitnessPal bring to the table. Consumers are able to discuss health and fitness topics via these platforms, creating a sense of community and group motivation to its users.   Under Armour continues to tactically build on these platforms in various ways, such as launching a premium monthly subscription for MyFitnessPal’s advanced services.    -   Yet it is not just at the consumer level that Under Armour has the innovative upper hand against competitors. The company has recently teamed up with the health tech company Zephyr Technology to create a sensor-equipped compressed shirt that can be used to enhance competitive athletes’ performance and decrease the risk of injury by measuring bodily statistics such as heart health, metabolic rate and VO2 max. This device additionally has the potential to be worn by players during sports events to track their peak acceleration, breathing rate and ECG (cardiovascular health) statistics, providing the ability to open up an entirely new market of exercise analysis and perhaps even ‘athlete statistic’ gambling in later years.

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Turn on your sensors, development is about to go 'wearable'

Turn on your sensors, development is about to go 'wearable' | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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Ebola — there’s an app for that:   Most sensors are fairly simple devices. The wearables challenge seeks applications that can provide low-power, unintrusive, highly durable solutions in low-income settings, and many sensor technologies fit that bill.  But there is also a world of sensors emerging that stretches the limits of the imagination. These devices might look simple, but are the result of decades of cutting-edge research at the outer limit of human ingenuity. And according to those who wield them, these sensors, which are invisible, have the power to reshape the relationship between people and the services we depend on most.   Dr. Anita Goel, chairman and CEO of Nanobiosym, manipulates nanomachines, absurdly small robots that read and write DNA.   She and her team have “turned them on their heads” and exploited these tiny machines as nanosensors, capable of capturing and conveying information at very small time and spatial scales. One result of this research is the “Gene-RADAR,” a handheld device Nanobiosym developed. Gene-RADAR, which looks something like an iPad, can diagnose any disease in real time with the same “gold standard” accuracy as a machine that typically weighs several hundred pounds and at one-tenth of the price, Goel told Devex.   “What it represents is an ability to really push forth the decentralization of health care, by bringing next generation infrastructure, instead of the big heavy infrastructure of the past,”

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Meet the dark horse of the wearables market: Xiaomi Mi Band

Meet the dark horse of the wearables market: Xiaomi Mi Band | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Beijing-based Xiaomi is taking on competitors like Apple and Fitbit for control of the wearable market.
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Beijing-based Xiaomi is taking on competitors like Apple and Fitbit for control of the wearable market.   Compared to the best-selling wearables in the United States, Xiaomi’s Mi Band looks underwhelming: It can’t display notifications, connect to third-party apps, or even tell the time. But, in the end, the product might just end up being what disrupts the wearables market just as it’s heating up.

Xiaomi shipped more wearable devices in the last quarter than everyone except tech giants Fitbit and Apple, according to a new report from IDC. In the second quarter of 2015, Xiaomi shipped 3.1 million units of its Mi Band — over four times as many wearables as the fourth place company, Garmin, and good for 17.1% of the global market. Sure, Xiaomi is best known for its smartphones, but it’s truly a major player in the fitness tracker world.  What makes the Mi Band’s rise so striking is that previously, it was sold only in a few select markets — most importantly, China.   Wearables is a broad category and it’s a valid argument that you can’t compare a Fitbit Force or Apple Watch to a Mi Band. An Apple Watch is a full computer on your wrist. The Mi Band doesn’t even have a screen.  But the Mi Band is radically cheaper than almost any other major wearable. It’s $15 and can do the same step tracking and sleep quantifying as Fitbit and Jawbone, all for a fraction of the price. Its simplicity helps it sport a 30-day battery life, which makes it less likely to end up in a drawer because users forgot to charge it. Its low price also makes it a realistic buy for the emerging middle class in many developing countries.

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Android Wear update adds interactive watch faces and Google Translate support for bilingual conversations

Android Wear update adds interactive watch faces and Google Translate support for bilingual conversations | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google today updated Android Wear with support for interactive watch faces and Google Translate. The new version is rolling out to all Android Wear watches over-the-air "in the coming weeks."
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Google has worked with some early partners on a handful of interactive watch faces. There are 21 available today, of which Google highlighted three to showcase what interactive watch faces can do:Bits: Choose the info you want at a glance — from weather, to unread mail, to upcoming meetings. Want to know this afternoon’s weather forecast? Just tap on weather.UnderArmour: Stay motivated with fitness stats on your wrist. Tap the watch face to see your step count, calories burned, and distance.Together: Two people can stay close throughout the day by turning the entire watch face into a space for sharing. Once you’ve paired your watch face with a partner’s, you’ll be able to share things like photos and emoji, as well as your activities (like if you’re working out, on the phone, or stuck in traffic).
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These Wearables Are Designed To Help People With Alzheimer's

These Wearables Are Designed To Help People With Alzheimer's | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
These wearables are designed to help with memory loss and wandering for people suffering with Alzheimer's.
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Toshiba announced it is entering the wearable market with a bracelet aimed at helping caretakers of elders suffering from dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. But, while it’s still too early to deem itself successful, Toshiba joins a few other companies using wearable technology to help with confusion and memory loss. Here are three promising wearable designs to help with the aging hardships.

Smart socks that alert caretakers. A 15-year-old New Yorker named Kenneth Shinozuka created a light-weight sensor at the heel of his grandfather’s sock to alert his aunt when he got out of bed. When the user leaves a particular spot, it alerts the smartphone app connected via Bluetooth. Shinozuka’s project was awarded the $50K Scientific American Science in Action Award last August. It is now in beta testing at care homes and there’s strong potential it will do well since users won’t have to wear a smartwatch to bed.

Smartwatch that defines danger zones. Using GPS, the CleverCare smartwatch defines danger and safety zones and alerts the caretaker if they leave or enter them. Its user interface includes simple, bold text and bright colors, making it easier for the user to read and create task reminders. In addition to the caretaker, emergency calls go to CleverCare’s 24-hour call center which can help direct them from wherever they are—a safety net that can offer peace of mind if nothing else.

Helping with memory loss. Singapore scientists are developing an application for the Google Glass to recognize different people the user knows. Researchers from the Institute for Infocomm Research at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star) told The Straits Times they are working on ways for the glasses to detect people (and the correct pills) and then displaying things like the name of the person’s identity or the correct pills. The prototype is currently being tested in user trials in Singapore.

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Salesforce banks on wearables with 20 enterprise Apple Watch apps

Salesforce banks on wearables with 20 enterprise Apple Watch apps | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Cloud-based customer relationship management vendor Salesforce is counting on the emerging wearable technology market to blossom and put its productivity applications in
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Lindsey Irvine, global director of strategic partnerships and business development, who heads up the wearables program at Salesforce, said that 79% of executives from companies using or piloting wearable technology described it as “a priority” for their future business strategy. She compared the burgeoning wearables market to the early days of the smart—smart phones didn’t get smart until there was software to run on them.  “It’s not about the device, it’s about the applications,” Irvine said. To kickstart the wearables application market, Salesforce last week announced a bundle of 20 new applications that run on the Apple Watch. Salesforce was a wearables keynote partner at Apple’s March conference, where Apple’s vice-president of technology, Tim Lynch, offered a sneak peek at Salesforce analytics technology running on a smart watch.

Salesforce’s survey also reveled that 76% of early adopters were claiming an increase in productivity, and 86% plan to invest more in wearable technology.   Much like the smart phone market, the wearable technology market is undergoing a splintering of platforms. Though according to survey results companies expected smart watches to lead the way in enterprise impact, smart lanyards, optical products like Google Glass, fitness bands, smart cameras and more are also entering the marketplace. Irvine again made the smart phone analogy in an interview, comparing to the variety of smart phone platforms and the need to develop for all of them.  That’s a lot of heavy lift for the ecosystem,” she said. It also plays to Salesforce’s hand, she said, claiming the platform is faster and simpler to bring apps to market for its network of four million developers.


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Boldr Voyage smartwatch looks like a normal watch, has a 6-month battery

Boldr Voyage smartwatch looks like a normal watch, has a 6-month battery | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Boldr Voyage is a Quartz watch that has a built-in pedometer for fitness tracking and
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The Voyage is similar to the Withings Activité and Activité Pop in that it looks like a stylish fashion accessory. The watch dial is inspired by pilot and aviator watches. The 43mm watch case is made from marine grade stainless steel with PVD coating and comes in matte and polished finishes, and is water-resistant up to 98 feet. It'll be sold with a variety of stitched leather bands.  The Boldr Voyage is billed as a "clever watch," not a smartwatch according to Worn and Wound. It's a Quartz watch first and foremost, but with just enough smarts to tell you something is happening on your phone. It's also got a 6-month battery that lasts longer than most smartwatches, which generally need to be recharged every night or even every week.  Notifications are pushed from your phone and alert you through the LEDs or vibrations. You can think of the watch's notifications as nudges that something is happening on your phone. Unlike an Apple Watch or an Android Wear-based smartwatch, you won't be able to respond to messages, check email or make calls; you'll need to use your phone to do so.

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Apple fast closing in on wearable device maker Fitbit

Apple fast closing in on wearable device maker Fitbit | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Apple Inc, which launched the Apple Watch in June, is within striking distance of leader Fitbit Inc in the wearable devices market, market research firm IDC said.Apple shipped 3.6 million Apple
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Apple shipped 3.6 million Apple Watches in the second quarter of 2015, just behind Fitbit's 4.4 million wearable fitness and health trackers, IDC said.  The Apple Watch, which sports many health-related features and apps, is seen as the biggest rival to Fitbit's trackers.  Shipments of wearable devices more than tripled to 18.1 million units in the second quarter, IDC said.  "It's worth noting that Fitbit only sells basic wearables - a category that is expected to lose share over the next few years, leaving Apple poised to become the next market leader for all wearables," the IDC report said.

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Apple and Fitbit To Face A New Smartwatch Contender: Swatch

Apple and Fitbit To Face A New Smartwatch Contender: Swatch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
 Swatch announces its plans to enter the smartwatch industry,competing against Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Fitbit Inc (NYSE:FIT) for a piece of the highly lucrative industry.

Via wearables4business
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The Swiss luxury watchmaker is the latest contender in the smart watch battle. According to chief executive of Swatch Group, Nick Hayek, the company plans to introduce a new range of smartwatches. The news was first reported by Reuters, citing the Swiss newspaper Tages-Anzeiger .  Swatch’s smartwatch will be called Touch Zero One. The company even expressed it plans to introduce further iterations of Touch Zero One, possibly all the way up to Zero Five, Zero Nine. The Swiss watchmaker is expected to unveil the Touch Zero Two at the 2016 Olympic Games, to be held in Rio de Janeiro.  Swatch’s smartwatch also varies from the other two in terms of functionality; the Swiss watchmaker’s offering appears to focus primarily on incorporating individual tech features within different models- as opposed to Apple, which offers an all-in-one smartwatch, combining different function such as making calls, sending messages along with fitness tracking features.   Swatch’s Touch Zero One’s features include aiding sportsmen, for example volleyball players, measure the intensity of their actions, and will also include other fitness tracking features, such as measuring distances. The Swiss watchmaker is even planning to introduce watches with embedded “near field communication” chips, later this year. This indicates that Swatch may be a more serious contender for Fitbit, whose offerings focus predominantly on fitness tracking, as opposed to the Apple Watch.

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Ralph Lauren Faces Patent Infringement Lawsuit For Wearable Technology Handbag

Ralph Lauren Faces Patent Infringement Lawsuit For Wearable Technology Handbag | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Ralph Lauren Corp. is being sued for patent infringement by a patent designer in Texas federal court. The fashion powerhouse reportedly copied the design for its $5,000 wearable technology handbag, which features an interior that illuminates and can also charge electrical devices.
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Jimmy Bryan filed a 10-page complaint, which, according to WWD, alleges that Ralph Lauren "has infringed and continues to infringe the patent by making, using, offering to sell, selling, distributing, and/or importing into the United States its Ricky Bag With Light, which is a receptacle with the precise electric accessory system at issue with the Patents-in-Suit."  -  Currently, Bryan does not have any bags for sale, so his lawsuit hinges on patent protection. - Ralph Lauren Retail, Leoht Inc. and Kickstarter Inc. are also named in the suit. According to WWD, Leoht handbags with a built-in battery, USB chargers, interior lighting and wireless recharging were first sold online via Kickstarter.  A Ralph Lauren spokesman told the trade publication on Friday that the company does not comment on legal matters.   The wearable technology variation of Lauren's signature Ricky bag hit the shelves for this past holiday season.

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Turner, Intel Team Up in Search of Next Great Wearable

Turner, Intel Team Up in Search of Next Great Wearable | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
intel and turner broadcasting have teamed up to find the next big wearable tech in a new series set to debut next year.
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Try this on: Intel and Turner Broadcasting have teamed up to find the next big wearable tech in a new series set to debut next year.
The show -- which has a working title of "America's Greatest Maker" -- will have contestants team up to make wearable tech using Intel's Curie technology, which is specifically designed for wearable devices.
The series is a spin on Intel's 2015 online challenge "Make it Wearable," in which the first place prize of $500,000 went to a team who created Nixie, a wearable drone camera that can take off from a person's wrist.  And while wearables have yet to gain mass adoption, the market is certainly lucrative: some 111 million units are expected to ship by 2018, according to a study published by the International Data Corporation.   The new series will feature Mark Burnett ("Shark Tank," "The Voice") as the executive producer and will run on TBS once semifinalists have been announced. Short-form, sharable content will also be produced on TNT, Adult Swim, truTV, HLN, CNN and Bleacher Report.   "This first-of-its-kind partnership starts with a compelling content idea, then uses Turner's capabilities to distribute that storytelling at scale, across all of our premium properties and platforms," Dan Riess, executive VP-integrated marketing for Turner Broadcasting, said in a statement. "As we embark on this new partnership with Intel and Mark Burnett, we have the opportunity to encourage innovative spirit, empower and inspire viewers to share content, reach the right audiences and, in the end, drive business results that matter."

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