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Google Glass: 10 use cases for wearable technology

Google Glass: 10 use cases for wearable technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
As Virgin Atlantic and the NYPD trial Google Glass, we look at the other potential business uses...
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Now we finally see some use cases

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Q&A with Matt Johnston, CMO of Applause (App metrics and Analytics firm)

Q&A with Matt Johnston, CMO of Applause (App metrics and Analytics firm) | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The wave of wearable tech is forcing software developers to think and develop in new ways. ...
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Q: Is wearable tech being used differently “in the wild” than creators anticipated?


MJ: Wearables, by their nature, get used differently than anticipated and exposed to vast amounts of environmental variance. They are used in ways and in locations that the creators never intended. As an example, one wearables customer told us they have users pairing the devices with a large number of unapproved devices – despite the fact that they list compatible devices on the box. This leads to frustrated users. Because almost all mobile and wearable apps are used in the wild, they need to be tested in the wild. For example, how does the wearable app react to moisture if it’s a fitness band? By constantly vetting the app’s performance under real-world conditions you can discover performance, interoperability or even battery issues that you thought were fine when you tested in the lab.

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China RFID leverages the Internet of Things

China RFID leverages the Internet of Things | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
China RFID leverages the Internet of Things | Printed Electronics World
Richard Platt's insight:

Leading analyst on the project, Dr Xiaoxi He, a Chinese national, says, "HF technology was developed much earlier in China compared to UHF technology and now the Chinese companies have mastered the core technologies in HF chip design. HF RFID covers a wide range of government-led projects including National Identification cards, transit cards, new bank cards with higher security requirements, passports and subway and bus tickets. UHF tags can be read at a longer distance and the cost is lower than with HF tags. The shipment of UHF tags exceeded that of HF tags for the first time in 2012. The annual shipment of UHF tags in China is very similar to that of HF tags. However, for the real applications in China, HF tags take 80% of the total value while the others (including UHF, LF and microwave) take the other 20%. That is because a large amount of UHF tags manufactured by market-oriented companies are for export. There are about 300 million UHF tags/cards used annually in China, including 50 million tags/cards for the smart meter project of national electricity grid application and 20 million for clothing projects of the People's Liberation Army".

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While Wearable Patents increase they are NOT the Hottest Patent Market

While Wearable Patents increase they are NOT the Hottest Patent Market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Lux Research said that the “printed, flexible and organic electronics” (PFOE) patent market is far hotter than the wearable patent market, saying that the number of PFOE patents registered since 2010 stood at 140,926, more than three times higher than that of wearable patents. Even in the PFOE patent category, Samsung Electronics has the largest share of 10%.

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Colorblind Artist Listens To Color To Paint Symphonies

Colorblind Artist Listens To Color To Paint Symphonies | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Colorblind artist Neil Harbisson has been claimed to be the first recognized cyborg in the world after being able to listen to color, even in his dreams.
Richard Platt's insight:

“Hearing colors changes the way you see everything. I started perceiving colors through sound and the eyeborg soon became part of my body,” Harbisson says in the Vimeo video “The Man Who Hears Colors, Even In His Dreams.” He added: “My body and technology have united.”  -  Harbisson has never been able to see color (only seeing shades of gray) before because he suffers from a visual condition called achromatopsia or total color blindness. This is a non-progressive and hereditary visual disorder which is characterized by decreased vision, light sensitivity, and the absence of color vision, says the National Institutes of Health. In the U.S. it affects about 1 in every 33,000 people.  -  This compelled Harbisson and cyberneticist Adam Montandon to come together to develop the electronic eye. Harbisson’s eyeborg is able to process the color frequency of the item that passes in front of it, which turns it into a sound frequency and passes the information to a chip installed at the back of his head. This is how he is then able to hear the color through the sound waves that are produce as they pass from the bones of the skill to his inner ear.

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Show me your brain - employers now scanning workers minds

Show me your brain - employers now scanning workers minds | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Companies are scanning their employees brain waves throughout the day to reduce fatigue and increase productivity.
Richard Platt's insight:

Workers at several Australian mining companies are already using the technology, which analyses their brain waves through the working day, and other sectors like aviation and oil and gas are starting to follow suit.  -  Dubbed "SmartCap", the device looks like a regular baseball cap but is wired up with equipment to conduct regular electroencephalogram (EEG) tests on the wearer.  -  The information is analysed to determine the alertness of the person wearing the cap and relayed to them immediately, as part of efforts to reduce fatigue-related accidents in the workplace.

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What's holding back wearable tech?

What's holding back wearable tech? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Personal health and wellness technologies are projected to be a $5 billion business this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.  Even
Richard Platt's insight:

Wearable technologies have a big obstacle to overcome: sensors — the miniaturized devices that measure things like speed and motion.  -  They are technically called MEMS, or microelectromechanical systems. We are most familiar with them in the forms of the accelerometers and gyroscopes that help smartphones and tablets keep track of motion. This is how we play games on our smartphones by just tilting and moving them, and how wearable wrist trackers count up our steps. -  "The sensor market today is being driven by mobile technology," Charlene Marini, VP of Marketing of Embedded segments at ARM, said earlier this year, in an interview with Marketplace at the Consumer Electronics Show. "There's a huge volume, of course, in mobile. And so mobile technology is being reused in things like wearables."

That reuse has had its limits. In wearable devices, current MEMS sensors have not been able to keep up with some of the rigors imposed on them. For example, they have not been as power efficient as needed.  -  They (reused MEMS device designs) also do not perform all the functions that wearable device designers dream up.  -  "A lot of these wearables end up in a sock drawer," says Karen Lightman, executive director of the MEMS Industry Group. "After you watch your steps for one week you're like, 'Yeah, I get it. I understand. I need to walk more. OK, that's not helpful.'"  -  There are efforts to do more than that by addressing the shortcomings of current MEMS sensors in key ways: building new sensors, creating software that better operates those sensors in more rigorous conditions, and better understanding the data coming out of current sensors.

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PIQ Unveils Wearable and Announces Global Golf Partnership with Mobitee

PIQ announces today the world's most advanced multi-sport sensor platform and a partnership with Mobitee. Golf is the first sport to have PIQ sensors
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Mobitee and PIQ comes bundled with an advanced PIQ multi-sport sensor and battery bank charger and is compatible with future PIQ sport products. It includes 18 NFC Club identification tags for each club and a clip for fastening the sensor to your golf glove. In addition, it provides unlimited access to the Mobitee and PIQ applications. Pair the sensor and attach the included NFC tags to each club and you are ready to go.  PIQ has created a lightweight and sleek GPS rangefinder that clips onto a golf glove and provides easy to read yardage to the front, center and back of the green. The yardage is shown on a vibrant LED display that is even viewable in extreme sunshine.

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Rithmio Raises $3M For Its Technology That Makes Wearables Smarter

Rithmio Raises $3M For Its Technology That Makes Wearables Smarter | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Rithmio, a Chicago-based maker of software that integrates with wearable technology to more accurately measure movement, just raised a $3 million seed round from several local and national...
Richard Platt's insight:

Rithmio says it can integrate with any motion sensing device to track exactly how objects move. And over time, it keeps learning and better understands how each person moves. Rithmio's software can be used by sports companies that are making new wearables, doctors who are looking to improve outpatient rehabilitation, and could even allow restaurant goers to sign their bill at dinner with a flick of their wrist.

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See the wearable tech of the future

See the wearable tech of the future | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Get to know the devices you'll be wearing next
Richard Platt's insight:

While futurism is an imperfect science, it’s human nature to guess at what’s just around the corner. We asked six wearable technology specialists to predict where technology is taking us, creating hypothetical products based on their answers.

1. Earrings will track your heart rate, body temperature and blood oxygen levels, providing you with vital health statistics. If you thought Bluetooth headsets made businessmen talking to themselves in public look strange, these earrings will take that to the next level.

2. Sensors in your shirt will monitor your physiology, broadcasting it to the world around you—letting people respond appropriately. A mood shirt could even beam data to your insurer, getting you discounts for feeling positive and healthy. Small devices in the shoulders will provide a screen-free GPS through small directional taps known as haptic feedback.

3. Shoes will convert movement into energy, powering internal sensors and other wearable devices. The sensors will help the shoes cool and heat your feet as necessary, as well as track your exercise and any weight changes.

4. Virtual assistant built into your contact lenses will keep your life organized while it gets to know you better than any other person ever could. The assistant will be able to analyze your tears to understand your emotional reactions, predict your thoughts and intentions, and react accordingly, providing you what you need before you even know you need it.

5. Microchips in nail polish or even embedded under the fingernails themselves will allow the smart contact lenses to track your movements, enable a keyboard function for virtual screens, give you the ability to draw virtually in three dimensions, or provide real-time haptic feedback for holographic interactions with your friends.

6.  Buttons will have embedded GPS, tracking your movements and learning your habits. That will let all your wearables react in real-time to your location, predicting where you’re about to go or making suggestions on what’s next. Getting lost will be a challenge, but if you somehow manage to end up in an unknown or dangerous place, your buttons will be able to contact your family or call 911 for help.


- Most of this struck me as just a little too Orwellian to me at least, the predictions maybe spot on about the technology, just not necessarily how people will allow it in to their lives, not unless they want to give up that much privacy.

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“Battle Royale” predicted by Barron's in Wearables Market Through 2016

“Battle Royale” predicted by Barron's in Wearables Market Through 2016 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
FBR Capital Market’s Daniel Ives and James Moore have a new note out Friday detailing why they see the wearables market heating up through the second half of this year and into next—and how the competition will play out. They write that with Apple’s (AAPL) entrance into the market with the Apple Watch, the company [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

Have been predicting this battle (as a major element of the Silicon Wars) since 2013, here's what two of Barron's analysts have to say.  "FBR Capital Market’s Daniel Ives and James Moore have a new note out Friday detailing why they see the wearables market heating up through the second half of this year and into next—and how the competition will play out.  And while it’s still in the early innings, they see wearables as a “tangible growth opportunity” and the next potential leg of growth for consumer electronics.  -  They believe the wearables will follow the smartphone model in that third-party applications will be a key driver, “with companies racing to establish themselves as the de facto platform/ standard for certain wearables categories (e.g., watches, augmented reality/smart glasses, bands, etc.).” Thus, next generation software releases, like Windows 10, will become increasingly important.  -  Ives and Moore see augmented reality devices as a main focus for big tech firms like Apple, Microsoft, Facebook and Google, with wearables ultimately representing a $20 billion market over the next three years. “This multi-billion-dollar market opportunity leaves large technology wearables vendors (e.g., AAPL, MSFT, etc.) as key beneficiaries of increasing consumer adoption, in our view, with Apple in particular poised to expand its all-important ecosystem of devices/services and Microsoft potentially adding another growth avenue to offset PC market headwinds in its core (Windows/Office) offerings.”  -  We have only see the tip of the iceberg so far, with enterprise applications following consumer wearables down the road, leading “vendors of all shapes and sizes [to] engage in a “battle royale” for market/mind share as competition in this next-generation technology area heats up over the coming 12 to 18 months.”


Happy Hunting folks

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Apple Watch's Reverse Strap Accessory Offers 30 Hours Extra Battery Life

Apple Watch's Reverse Strap Accessory Offers 30 Hours Extra Battery Life | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Reverse Strap will start shipping November 3 and supports both 38mm or 42mm Apple Watches.
Richard Platt's insight:

A new accessory strap band for the Apple Watch seems to solve one of the most popular concerns of the device - its battery life. Reverse Strap has revealed its accessory strap band that claims over 30 hours of additional battery life.  -  Confirming the design features and final technical specifications of its accessory strap band, which had been teased earlier this year, Reserve Strap has announced a shipping date of November 3. The company however points out that only those who pre-order will be guaranteed a Reserve Strap by the said date. Interestingly, Reserve Strap promises free express shipping for all US orders while confirming it can ship elsewhere globally at a flat rate of $20

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ASU professor develops foldable battery for Apple Watch, wearable tech

ASU professor develops foldable battery for Apple Watch, wearable tech | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The innovation could allow wearable tech devices to be even thinner in design.
Richard Platt's insight:

“This battery is for a wearable device that can move and fit the physical environment,” Jiang told me Monday in his Tempe lab. “It has the same thickness and stretchability as a rubber band, without losing its functionality.”  This ASU-developed stretchable, foldable battery fuses origami-style design into the battery designed to expand wearables capabilities.  Jiang foresees his patent-pending lithium-ion battery prototype to be incorporated into the watch strap of a smart watch, enabling the actual watch device to be thinner while also doubling the charge capacity of the battery.

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Google Reveals Health-Tracking Wristband

Google Reveals Health-Tracking Wristband | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Google’s life sciences group has created a health-tracking wristband that could be used in clinical trials and drug tests, giving researchers or physicians minute-by-minute data on how patients are faring.  The experimental device, developed within the company’s Google X research division, can measure pulse, heart rhythm and skin temperature, and also environmental information like light exposure and noise levels. It won’t be marketed as a consumer device, said Andy Conrad, head of the life sciences team at Google.  “Our intended use is for this to become a medical device that’s prescribed to patients or used for clinical trials,”   -  Doctors, researchers and drugmakers have long craved a way to continuously track patients’ vital signs outside of a lab. Yet creating a device that’s easy for patients to use, while also capturing rich, accurate data has been a challenge, said Kara Dennis, managing director of mobile health at Medidata, a New York-based firm that specializes in data analytics.

Google offers health-monitoring smartwatch features in its Android Wear software platform for consumers, through partners such as LG Electronics Inc. Apple Inc. and others also have smartwatches and devices with health features. Yet most existing consumer devices aren’t rigorous enough for research, said Conrad.  That’s where Google X may play a role. 

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Pharma Guy's curator insight, June 25, 8:25 AM

OMG! This is the ugliest thing I have ever seen!

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Review of the Microsoft Band: How this wearable tracker helped — and hurt — my Golf game

Review of the Microsoft Band: How this wearable tracker helped — and hurt — my Golf game | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Sweating my butt off in 90-degree heat while donning the Microsoft Band at Pumpkin Ridge. AURORA, Ore. — As we approach the fifth hole at Langdon Farms, on
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Well thought out analysis on the pro's and con's of MSFT's Band

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Scientists create stretchable, printable, wearable conductor for biological sensors

Scientists create stretchable, printable, wearable conductor for biological sensors | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed an electrically conductive ink that can be used in clothing to provide a more comfortable way to measure biological data.
Richard Platt's insight:

The ink developed by researchers at the University of Tokyo can be applied to fabrics used in data-collecting clothing that can cover a wider area.  -  “The technology will allow for simultaneous measuring of assorted biological information from the entire body,” said Takao Someya, an engineering professor at the university. “The ink is expected to be used not only in sports but also in many other fields, such as medicine and welfare services.”  -  To create an electrically conductive ink with high elasticity, Someya and his colleagues dissolved a fluorine rubber material in a solvent and then added silver and a surface-active agent to the mixture.

Lines printed on fabric with the ink can maintain extremely high conductivity even if the cloth is stretched to more than three times its original length, according to the researchers. -  The researchers said they still have some challenges to overcome, including the ink’s vulnerability to water.  -  But they also succeeded in monitoring the movements of muscles using “wires” and “electrodes” printed with the special ink, and said the success is a huge step toward the development of sportswear that contain biological sensors. Scientists have been developing technologies to attach sensors to as many points on clothing as possible to obtain more accurate data while maintaining comfort.

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Big Pharma company steps into wearable devices market

Big Pharma company steps into wearable devices market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Drugs giant Novartis has stepped into the wearables technology market with an app called ViaOpta, designed for the visually impaired. Established as a prototype, the company this week unveiled modifications.
Richard Platt's insight:

The ViaOpta app by Novartis  has been configured for use with the Apple Watch and rival devices as investment in the wearables market continues. The app also works on Apple’s iPhone and Android mobile devices, as well as the new generation of wearables.  -  The app is designed to help people with different forms of visual impairment. The primary function is to help people with vision problems to become more independent. This is achieved through a navigation function. The device also helps people recognize common objects, such as money and a set of familiar objects.  -  The app has a camera function and the wearer can direct the device in front of them and receive information via an audio feed about what is in front of them. In trials the app has also recognized traffic crossings, alterations to pavements and other traffic sounds. Voice commands are currently available in several languages, including English, Spanish, Portuguese and French.
As well as voice instructions the device can also be configured to produce vibration signals. Vibrations are designed to work when the user is coming close to a road intersection or major landmark in the middle of the pathway. Due to this functionality, Novartis claim that the device is the first so-called “turn-by-turn” navigation application designed for a wearable device. This means the app works in a similar way to Google Maps.  -  Another useful addition is that the device allows the user, or their carer, to pinpoint the wearer’s exact position. This location can also be shared.

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Wearable technology struggles for consumer fit amid patent production boom

Wearable technology struggles for consumer fit amid patent production boom | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The technology behind wearable electronics finally may have arrived, but whether consumers will greet it with open wallets is another question.
Richard Platt's insight:

Leading the pack is Samsung Electronics, followed by Qualcomm Inc. and Apple Inc. Market watchers say Samsung is trying to take advantage of a burgeoning technological market with wider consumer interest in the years to come.  -  “1st, moving into wearable electronics agrees with the general interest of using electronic devices to better understand oneself in a quantitative way,” Lux research analyst Tony Sun said in an email. “2nd, Samsung is a major consumer electronic device and component developer. Wearable devices, like smartwatches, are a natural fit for Samsung’s existing manufacturing capability, technology portfolio as well as customer base.”  -  Analysts also say increased patent production could be a sign that developers are looking to transform the wearable technology industry.

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How a Turkish bank is using Apple’s Watch to engage people with ‘short, powerful’ interactions’

How a Turkish bank is using Apple’s Watch to engage people with ‘short, powerful’ interactions’ | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Turkish bank Akbank is looking to wearable technology for the future of banking, using the Apple Watch to create a new banking channel...
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The app captures information about the smartwatch wearer, allowing them to manage their accounts in a myriad of ways including accessing daily statements, performing currency conversions based on location and locating the nearest branch. Importantly, the app can withdraw money from ATMs via SMS Pass or iBeacon. 

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Casio Throwing Its Hat Into Burgeoning Smartwatch Market Early Next Year

Casio Throwing Its Hat Into Burgeoning Smartwatch Market Early Next Year | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
As smartphones became increasingly popular, the market for wrist watches took a nosedive. The irony is that smartphone makers are now focusing their...
Richard Platt's insight:

To help itself stand out from the competition, Casio will take a bit of a different approach -- the company says its wearable will be a watch with smart functions, rather than a smart device that is also a watch.  "we are trying to bring our smartwatch to a level of watch perfection -- a device that won't break easily, is simple to put on and feels good to wear."  -  Kashio also said the watch will be priced around $400. That's a bit more than Apple's lower-end Apple Watch that starts at $349, and quite a bit more than several Android alternatives. It will be interesting to see what Casio brings to the table to command a $400 price tag.

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Samsung Ranked As No. 1 Patent Filer For Wearable Devices

Samsung Ranked As No. 1 Patent Filer For Wearable Devices | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The company now accounts for 4% of all wearable patents filed since 2010, with a strong focus on arm and head form factors.
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung accounts for 4% of the 41,301 patents published on wearable electronics between 2010 to May 2015. Following close behind in the rankings are Qualcomm with 3% of patents and Apple with 2.2%. Developers not associated with the top 15 companies filing wearable patents make up the vast majority of filers, at 77%.

Samsung’s place at the top of the rankings shouldn’t come as a complete surprise, considering it was the first major tech company to launch a smartwatch in Sept. 2013 with the Samsung Galaxy Gear. Still, being first hasn’t led to a resounding success. The Gear launched to mixed reviews and by October 2013 around 30% of Gear watches being sold at electronics retailer Best Buy were reportedly being returned by customers.

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Apple Watch Sales Aren't Looking So Hot

Apple Watch Sales Aren't Looking So Hot | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
(Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images) The iPhone continues to sell like hot cakes -- 74.5 million units in the second quarter of 2015 -- but the Apple Watch appears to be far away from catching up. Pacific Crest Securities analyst Andy Hargreaves said on Wednesday that he's trimming his estimates for Apple Watch sales. [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

“Anecdotal evidence suggests Apple Watch demand is slowing quickly,” Hargreaves wrote in a research note to the brokerage firm’s clients. He continued, “Reviews of the device have been mixed, the fashion angle appears to be leaning a bit too much toward ‘calculator watch,’ and general consumer interest as measured by search volume is below the iPod.”  -  Other Wall Street analysts are also not so confident in Apple Watch sales. In May, UBS cut its Apple Watch shipment projection by 23% to 31 million. And initial interest from consumer with the Apple Watch was 20% of initial interest was with the iPhone when it first launched in 2007, UBS wrote in a note to clients.  -  Apple hasn’t yet disclosed any sales figures for the device.  Sales and early reviews of the Apple Watch indicate the watch has a while before it finds its footing.

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7 wearable technology roles that will change the world

7 wearable technology roles that will change the world | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
As the world of wearables continues to grow, Adecco has created an infographic of 7 wearable technology roles that will change the world.
Richard Platt's insight:

The infographic on the webpage is like an all-in-one, definitely a good capture of what is getting traction in the world of wearables.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 28, 6:44 PM

Technology is creating more applications in wearable, IoT, cloud security and more all the time. The new jobs resulting from that are well paid and will need to be filled in the next few years. Follow the trends and be in demand.

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How the Wearable Tech Can Spark Special Ed Classrooms

How the Wearable Tech Can Spark Special Ed Classrooms | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
At the A. Harry Moore School of New Jersey City University, we have a rich tradition of embracing best practice in educational and therapeutic research and applying that knowledge in the classrooms of our demonstration laboratory school. As a Supervisor of Curriculum and Instruction, I am always lo
Richard Platt's insight:

By posting this, I am imploring that engineers, marketers, designers and managers in High tech firms to get out in the wild and work with those that are have real needs and build solutions that fit those people's needs and focus on the JTBD 's (Jobs-To-Be-Done) what they are trying to get done, you just might discover that you have a Minimum Winning Game on your hands.


For instanceThe Apple Watch was a huge hit in their pre-school, especially because early learners love any item that can be presented in a show-and-tell capacity. The children sat with their eyes wide open as each student patiently waited for a chance to try on the Watch.

Beyond just the appearance, pre-school students benefitted from learning about social studies concepts using the Apple Watch. For example, it was used as a teaching tool about geo-location. How does the Watch know that I am in Jersey City? Isn’t the Watch smart? The technology generated a meaningful conversation, even amongst the teachers. In fact, the pre-school teacher had the idea of using the Apple Watch to collect student behavioral data, and even discussed the idea of using the Apple Watch as a classroom pet that different students would get turns to take home.


Implications for Special Education:

Personalization for Individual Students - when the zoom setting was adjusted to match the needs of an individual student by making the typeface on the watch larger. The students also enjoyed using Siri to turn the voice over on. Also, the concept of having the “wearable” watch right on the student’s wrist is helpful for students who might not have use of all ten fingers but may be able to swipe or double-tap the watch with one or two fingers and use it independently.

Data Tracking - Adapted physical education teacher Ms. Bierig explored ways to use wearable technology like a Fitbit along with the Apple Watch to track student achievement data.

Accessibility - In Ms. Thompson’s middle school class, she and her students explored how the accessibility settings on the iPhone transfer to the watch to help meet the assistive technology needs of the individual students.

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The FDA doesn’t want to regulate wearables, and device makers want to keep it that way

The FDA doesn’t want to regulate wearables, and device makers want to keep it that way | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration doesn't want to take away your Fitbit.That was the philosophy the FDA broadcast earlier this year when it unveiled its "draft guidance" for low-risk medical devices, a non-binding proposal that described the agency's thinking on regulation of devices like wearable fitness trackers. The guidance effectively suggests the agency won't vigorously regulate devices as long as they're not harmful and generally encourage healthy habits. Many devices with less-than-stellar track records for accuracy — such as calorie counters — would likely not be covered under the guidance. "Basically [we are] being transparent in where the FDA is focusing their enforcement efforts," says Bakul Patel, associate director for digital health at the FDA.


Via Alex Butler, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

The FDA's draft guidance, "General Wellness: Policy for Low Risk Devices," describes which devices the agency believes it should focus on regulating. That includes "general wellness" products, which are described in two ways. First, the products that either have "an intended use that relates to maintaining or encouraging a general state of health or a healthy activity," such as a device that helps "log, track, or trend exercise activity." The devices may also have "an intended use claim that associates the role of healthy lifestyle with helping to reduce the risk or impact of certain chronic diseases or conditions" when the science clearly shows a healthy lifestyle can have an impact. (The FDA already considers something a "medical device" if it's used to diagnose or treat a disease.) "Low risk" products, according to the guidance, are non-invasive and generally do not "pose a risk to a user’s safety if device controls are not applied." 

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Cows now easier to track with wearable tech collars

Cows now easier to track with wearable tech collars | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A bell-shaped GPS collar is helping dairy farmers to locate exactly where their cattle are, track their movements and produce more milk.
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“tracking the behaviour of cows is vital to farmers who want to best manage their grazing,” said Tim Evans, design director at Cambridge Industrial Design, the firm that created the collar.  “We took our inspiration from the traditional alpine cow bell, using a rounded shape to minimise the size and maximise strength,” he said. “This ensures it is rugged enough to cope with being bashed against fences and feeding troughs and simple enough for farmers to remove for cleaning and recharging.”  The collar is made of tough glass-filled nylon using the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3D printing process for fast prototyping and revisions during the field trial phase of the project. The first results are expected to be published next month.  The data is fed back in real-time though mobile GSM networks to a central hub, where it is analysed with other data such as milk yields and grass length, as monitored by the Grass Hopper device. The Grass Hopper allows farmers to see where the longest, lushest grass is, so that the cows are grazing in the best area by creating location-based virtual electric fences using the cow bell collars, which confine them to specific pastures. The geo-fences can be remotely changed depending how good grazing conditions are, while cutting the time and manpower needed to manually put up and take down physical electric fences.

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