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A Smart Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review

A Smart Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Jawbone’s new activity-tracking wristband can be used to start your coffeemaker when you get up.
Richard Platt's insight:

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): Interesting analysis, but keep in mind MIT is late to this game on IoT & Wearables

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Why wearables are the hardest gadgets to build

Why wearables are the hardest gadgets to build | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
If there's been one theme of wearable tech through 2014 and 2015, it's been delays. The Razer Nabu, Jawbone UP3 and even the Apple Watch have all left consumers waiting empty handed, and while you might excuse the first two companies for being unable to meet demand, it's all the more surprising when Apple can't…
Richard Platt's insight:

"I think wearable tech is exposed more because it's on the body 24/7 so it's exposed to the elements. Wearables are exposed to wear and tear to a greater extent than other consumer tech. When you put something on the body it means it has to be more robust," he said.  -  As well as having to make wearables capable of surviving the rigours of everyday life, providing the data and features we've come to expect and last a usable amount of time on minuscule batteries, Godfrey also explained that it's essential to make them wearable.  -  Advanced wearables are heavily sophisticated, with powerful processors capable of complex computing on your wrist. For a company like Jawbone it's a priority to produce that in a small and comfortable design and form factor as possible. The UP3 is around 30% smaller than equivalent multi-sensor trackers and UP2 is 45% smaller than the UP24.  -  "That's where you get 24/7 wearability, when it disappears on the wrist,"

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Desert Valley Medical Center First to Use Leaf Patient-Wearable Technology to Help Reduce C-Sections, Speed Labor

PLEASANTON, Calif., May 5, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Desert Valley Medical Center, named a Top 100 Hospitals® in...
Richard Platt's insight:

"We believe the Leaf technology has applications far beyond pressure ulcer prevention," said Dr. Barrett Larson, Chief Medical Officer of Leaf Healthcare. "For example, in Labor and Delivery, Leaf can help make sure that patients with epidurals are turning sufficiently, which has been shown to help with the laboring process."  -  The Leaf system is comprised of a small, lightweight, wearable sensor that electronically monitors a patient's position and movements. Data collected by the sensor is communicated wirelessly to central monitoring stations or mobile devices so that caregivers can check on patient position and movement. The system provides alerts when necessary to ensure that all patients wearing a Leaf Sensor are repositioned according to their prescribed turning schedules to reduce incidence of pressure ulcers. The device has been cleared for sale by FDA 510(k).

WHY IMPORTANT - THE PROBLEM IT SOLVES:

The national U.S. cesarean rate in 2012 was 32.8%, which has remained fairly constant for several years. Cesarean sections are the most common operating room procedure in U.S. hospitals. Overuse of this procedure is associated with excess morbidity in women and babies. For both commercial and Medicaid payers, total maternal-newborn costs are about 50% higher for cesarean compared with vaginal births.

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5 user challenges every company with an Apple Watch app needs to know

5 user challenges every company with an Apple Watch app needs to know | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
In our work with large consumer-facing brands to create, refine and fix their applications, these are the five recurring challenges we have seen that are particularly relevant to wearables

Via Jesús Hernández
Richard Platt's insight:

Excellent analysis on why wearables are a problem and that these issues need to be fixed, not just on the Apple Watch, but on other wearables as well.  Definitely a worthwhile read if you're in the wearable design space.

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Infographic: Wearable Tech at the Intersection of Function and Fashion

Infographic: Wearable Tech at the Intersection of Function and Fashion | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
From fitness trackers to smart watches, the trend in gear is tracking and customization. Once a status symbol for fitness-focused folks and tech geeks, wearable tech has become ubiquitous, as has the underlying concept of using passively tracked information for personal benefit.
Richard Platt's insight:

Great info presented in a graphic ~52% of men said they would never wear a connected jacket.  Rankings of the most important factors in purchase considerations (no real surprises) 1. Capabilitites (i.e. functionality), 2. Looks (i.e. aesthetics), 3. Price (i.e. value of purchasing and using) 4. Comfort (also doesn't make you feel like a social outcast) 5. Customization (e.g. "how do I make this work for my specific needs and things I want to do")

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Technical Problem Could Curb Apple Watch Availability

Technical Problem Could Curb Apple Watch Availability | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Problems with a component of the Apple Watch could exacerbate a shortage of the much-hyped wearable technology.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Wall Street Journal reports that the taptic engine made by China-based AAC Technologies Holdings breaks down over time, which forced the tech giant to scrap some already-completed watches.  -  The taptic engine involves a small motor that alerts wearers by gently tapping them on the wrist; the technology also enables users to send their heartbeats to others.  -  Nidec Corp., a Japanese company that also supplied the engines to Apple, did not experience the same reliability problems. Apple reportedly shifted nearly all of that work to Nidec, but increasing its production capacity could take some time.

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$20M Police Body-Camera Program unveiled

$20M Police Body-Camera Program unveiled | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The move comes amid growing calls for transparency and accountability in the law enforcement community.
Richard Platt's insight:

US officials on Friday announced a $20-million pilot program to help equip law enforcement agencies across the country with body cameras. - The program is part of a general push by US police agencies to outfit officers with cameras to provide clear recordings of arrests, and is part of a proposal by President Barack Obama last year to invest $75M to purchase 50,000 body cameras.

The move comes amid growing calls for transparency and accountability in the law enforcement community after a string of high-profile deadly encounters between white police officers and black men. - “Body-worn cameras hold tremendous promise for enhancing transparency, promoting accountability, and advancing public safety for law enforcement officers and the communities they serve,” the new attorney general, Loretta Lynch, said in a statement.

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Mobile identity and wearables: You are what you wear

Mobile identity and wearables: You are what you wear | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Article Details
Richard Platt's insight:

Making the very detailed case for biometrics for security in the mobile and wearable space - "There is probably more mileage in the physical access control (PAC) industry, where the ecosystem is ready to see corporate badges replaced by smartphones and wearable devices. The development of biometric-enabled smartcards also provides an alternative method of providing stronger security for card-based PAC deployments; users cannot access a building with the badge that I have found in the street or stolen from a handbag because the card will not work without the authorised fingerprint." 

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Moolahonly's curator insight, May 4, 11:00 PM

These are the types of wearable devices we would like help get funding on our crowdfunding platform www.moolahonly.com

 

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The Next Premium Smartwatch To Take On Apple Watch

The Next Premium Smartwatch To Take On Apple Watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A startup called Olio Devices is announcing that it's entering the fray of smartwatches. Its founder and CEO, Steve Jacobs, is a veteran of Apple's iPod and iPhone teams, as well as design work for...
Richard Platt's insight:

The Model One series, which Olio is unveiling today, has several distinguishing characteristics. Compared to most connected watches already on the market, the Model One has a premium feel, with hand-finished, water-resistant steel cases, glass backs that display the charging coils within, fancy straps, and a variety of proprietary technologies designed to do things like improve the display’s quality and extend the battery life to two days of use between charges. Starting price of $595, places the Model One near the top of the current smartwatch market. -  Like most smartwatches, the Model One is on the hefty side, but Olio put four weights inside to balance it on your hand and reduce the chances of it slipping around on your wrist. The colour LCD screen looks good, and lets you accomplish everything through touch (no available buttons).

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, May 1, 3:57 PM

Startup Olio enters the smartwatch fray with an elegant premium timepiece.

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IT Outsourcing: How Offshoring Can Kill Innovation

IT Outsourcing: How Offshoring Can Kill Innovation | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Harvard Business School professors David Pisano and Willy Shih argue that overzealous offshore outsourcing can cripple a company's ability to innovate. Pisano and Shih discuss what CIOs can learn from the manufacturing sector about how 'not' to approach offshore outsourcing.
Richard Platt's insight:

Not only true about IT, but also true about outsourcing innovation  as Willy Shih, Professor of Management Practice, Harvard Business School: The troubling thing that our research turned up is that offshoring can lead to damage to what we call the industrial commons—a set of capabilities embodied in your supplier network, your workforce, the educational infrastructure associated with a technology area. For example, in the 1960s Kodak gave up making sophisticated film cameras, and the U.S. consumer electronics companies offshored their product manufacturing and development. So the industrial commons for consumer electronic and optoelectronic devices in the U.S. withered away. So when the digital camera revolution came along—even though Kodak invented the first digital camera in the 1970s—there was no longer any capability base in the U.S. to develop or manufacture such products.

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Keystone Strategy's curator insight, Today, 4:28 PM

At Keystone, we believe in enabling companies to innovate and make manufacturing decisions that position them for long run growth. Read the following CIO article by Keystone experts Gary Pisano and Willy Shih to learn more.

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How wearable products missing the boat?

How wearable products missing the boat? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Find out more at Wearable World Congress, May 19-20.
Richard Platt's insight:

Urska Srsen's co-founder and COO of BellaBeat focuses on female health and fitness: "Other wearable products are not adjusted to a specific user, they only produce raw data. They want to cover everybody instead of focusing on one user, and providing information and insights that are important for that user—not just numbers and charts and raw data. This is one of the things we're always trying to avoid. That's why Leaf doesn't have any interface on the hardware. All the data is presented on the software, so that we can present you with an insight on your health, not just overburden you with raw data. That doesn't really mean much, if it's not put into a context."

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Wearables, the IoT and 3D Printing Could Revolutionize Field Services

Wearables, the IoT and 3D Printing Could Revolutionize Field Services | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
By optimizing workflows and cutting inefficiency costs, smartglasses and other emerging technologies are proving their worth in the field.
Richard Platt's insight:

In forward-thinking enterprises, a potent mix of technologies (augmented reality, 3D visualizations, and video conferencing) is piped through smartglasses to give field service workers critical information and facilitate valuable interactions, hands-free. Schematics are overlaid onto the machines that workers are servicing, right before their eyes. Workers in remote locations can see what field service workers see to lend a helping hand. And, straight out of a scene from Minority Report, field service engineers scroll through data downloaded via the cloud using hand gestures.

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Moolahonly's curator insight, April 29, 1:08 PM

These are the types of wearable devices we would like help get funding on our crowdfunding platform www.moolahonly.com

 

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8 Infuriating Problems With The Apple Watch

8 Infuriating Problems With The Apple Watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Ugh....
Richard Platt's insight:

Not an unreasonable list either 

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The IoT: What Does It Take to Make it Real?

The IoT: What Does It Take to Make it Real? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Tony Shan
Richard Platt's insight:

Cisco VP of IoT Systems and Software Group Kip Compton and his take on what needs to be addressed.

• There is a lot of interest in fog computing; participants see the limitations of a cloud-only approach and understand the value of our fog approach

• There is deep interest in the skills gap and how to address it (see the education initiative we launched at the IoT World Forum last October)

• There is much interest in how to achieve interoperability, which involves leveraging the stack from things up to applications

• And, no surprise here, there was widespread agreement that IoT security is a big challenge and one that is ripe for innovation (see my April 15 blog on Cisco’s plan to team with Identiv for access control and identity management)

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Building the Business Case for Business Wearables

Building the Business Case for Business Wearables | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Channel will be instrumental in helping enterprises put smart wearables to good use
Richard Platt's insight:

As it turns out, wearable technology avails itself to quite a diverse array of business applications.  -  In law enforcement, the benefits of wearable technology are indisputable. Head- and wrist-mounted screens provide police officers and military personnel hands-free access to critical data. The same holds true for emergency workers, search-and-rescue teams and environmental disaster teams.  -  In manufacturing, wearables can be used to manage equipment remotely - assembly-line machinery, for example - rendering processes more efficient and increasing worker safety.

Any technician needing to consult a manual would most likely appreciate a wearable device that leaves one's hands free, and so would anybody who wants to share what they're seeing with customers, or with colleagues for training purposes, be it in healthcare, construction, automobile repair, or another area where 'show and tell' plays a key role.  -  In the sales arena, many believe that having fast, reliable access to data via wearables can enhance customer service. Salesforce.com execs have been especially bullish on the idea. With its Salesforce Wear initiative, launched in 2014, the company is committed to working alongside Accenture and partnering with a number of vendors to develop "contextually aware sales apps" for an array of wearable devices.

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Zing wearable technology offers fun alternative to Apple Watch

Zing wearable technology offers fun alternative to Apple Watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
IF you're in the mood to buy some wearable technology, then a new gadget being launched by a Cambridge firm could be right up your street. The Zing is the first of a range of products being...
Richard Platt's insight:

Zing was meant as a fun, alternative to high-end products such as the Apple Watch, and at a price of £49.99 (~$75.00) it will certainly be better for your bank balance.

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FlexEnable launches wearable technology lab

FlexEnable launches wearable technology lab | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
UK flexible display innovator FlexEnable has announced plans to create a new Wearable Technology Lab.
Richard Platt's insight:

The potential FlexEnable’s plastic-mounted transistor technology has for driving screens in this segment was shown by a new demonstrator at the event.  -  This is an electroluminescent display designed for fitting into the sleeve of an outdoor jacket – an application in which a traditional smartphone would be too rigid and too heavy.

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It costs about $84 to make an Apple Watch Sport 38mm

It costs about $84 to make an Apple Watch Sport 38mm | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Consumers are spending hundreds of dollars on the Apple Watch, but it really only takes $83.70 to manufacture it.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Apple Watch Sport 38mm costs $349 but IHS' study shows the bill of materials comes out to $81.20 plus to $2.50 in manufacturing expense, which results in $83.70   -  "It is fairly typical for a first-generation product rollout to have a higher retail price versus hardware cost," said Kevin Keller, senior principal analyst-materials and cost benchmarking services for IHS Technology. "While retail prices always tend to decrease over time, the ratio for the Apple Watch is lower than what we saw for the iPhone 6 Plus and other new Apple products, and could be of great benefit to Apple's bottom line if sales match the interest the Apple Watch has generated."


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At $50, Fake Apple Watch Offers Features the Real One Lacks

At $50, Fake Apple Watch Offers Features the Real One Lacks | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Gold plating not included
Richard Platt's insight:

At less than $50—you can pick up a smartwatch that looks quite similar to Apple's own creation, complete with replica Digital Crown and touch screen. Like the Cupertino original that went on sale today for seven times the price, the generic offering spotted in this bustling Chinese city features an activity tracker, chat apps, Web browser, and Bluetooth connectivity. A brief demo unveiled shortcomings in the browser with only the text loading on screen.

A replica Apple Watch on sale in China's Shenzhen City. The smartwatch features a camera and allows phone calls without the need for a smartphone connection.  - What this no-name watch provides that Apple doesn't is phone calls right from the watch—without the need to connect to your smartphone—through a built-in microphone and surprisingly clear speaker. Its 3-megapixel front-facing camera adds another feature that won't be found on the wrists of Apple Watch buyers.

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Why wearable tech needs body Wi-Fi

Why wearable tech needs body Wi-Fi | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Move along Bluetooth, Wi-Bo is coming. Wi-Bo, or body Wi-Fi, is the proposed new wireless tech that one analyst thinks is the key to building a network of small, useful wearables around the body which talk to each other and the rest of the internet. Read this: Apple Watch review - what's it good for?…
Richard Platt's insight:

Trying to make the case for Wi-Bo, or body Wi-Fi, is the proposed new wireless tech that one analyst thinks is the key to building a network of small, useful wearables around the body which talk to each other and the rest of the internet.  -  Andrew Sheehy, chief analyst at Generator Research, outlined his proposal for a new wireless technology on the company's research portal TekCarta.  -  With so many devices built for wrists, faces, ears and other body parts, Sheehy argues that we need a couple of things to happen before everything can work together.  -  We need to move beyond Bluetooth and Wi-Fi and develop a "micro-range" wireless standard for tiny wearables which uses a frequency above Wi-Fi - say, 10 - 20 GHz.

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Technology Profit and Pivots in the $300 Billion Wedding Space

Technology Profit and Pivots in the $300 Billion Wedding Space | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The global wedding market is now a $300 billion industry. And behind all those silk covered buttons and wedding cupcakes, lies a goldmine of killer apps, wearables and platforms....
Richard Platt's insight:

One is the continued growth potential for wedding sites. Cloud-based do-it-yourself website development platforms are a growth industry worth $24 billion in the US, and growing 4.9 percent annually. , "Much of this wedding marketplace is comprised of small businesses that need services, tools, innovations and efficiencies."  

The wedding industry is bracing for a surge on the wearable technology side, as well. The industry predicted to be worth $20B this year, and expected to grow to nearly $70B by 2025, encompasses apparel from head to foot, and body adornment devices. "Soon these wearables will be measuring the bride and groom's heart rate at key moments," says Tito Chowdhury, founder and executive director of the influential FashionNXT, a Portland, Oregon-based fashion show which focuses on how wearable technology intersects with fashion.

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Apple Watch Review

Apple Watch Review | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Apple Watch is now on the wrists of members of the general public for the first time, and opinions about its usefulness are flying fast and furious. Here..
Richard Platt's insight:

Pros:

Terrific hardware design

Basic features offer instant utility
Cons: 

More advanced features are less than intuitive

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MSFT Awarded Patent For Emotion Detecting Eyewear

MSFT Awarded Patent For Emotion Detecting Eyewear | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Wall Street Journal says Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) has managed to get a patent for smart glasses that can interpret human emotions.
Richard Platt's insight:

Microsoft’s filling reveals that the user of the device could get an idea of another individual or even a group’s thoughts at any given time, based on changes in their respective body temperatures and vocal activity. The glasses are fitted with both visual and audio sensors that focus on the subject’s body movement. The recorded data which may or may not include slight movements in speech, physical movements, eye contact and other gestures, is then compared with corresponding emotional categories in Microsoft’s information database and subsequently displayed to the consumer.

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Researchers propose body WiFi for the wearable technology age

Researchers propose body WiFi for the wearable technology age | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A completely new wireless standard might be needed to provide connectivity in the age of wearables, replacing the WiFi with Body Fi, a researcher has suggested.
Richard Platt's insight:

In an article on the Generator Research website, editor Andrew Sheehy describes how the current wireless standards fall short of what’s needed to provide smooth connectivity for the increasing number of wearable devices and proposed a way to tackle the problem.  -  Instead of connecting each of these devices separately to a wireless network, he proposed to connect them to a single controlling device that could act as an interface for the rest of the body network.  - Due to the minute dimensions of some of the foreseen wearable devices, such as ear buds or capsules that are swallowed for measuring parameters inside the body, the network would have to use a short-range wireless networking standard that wouldn’t require bulky transmitters.

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, April 29, 10:57 PM

How do you control things when you are wearing multiple wearable devices?

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Tech Leaders See Wearables Working in the Workplace

Tech Leaders See Wearables Working in the Workplace | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Robert Half Technology offers three questions for IT leaders to consider when evaluating whether to support wearables for the business:

  1. Will this implementation enhance our business and/or productivity? Consider whether or not a new technology benefits your company and how it will add value to the business. Beyond hopping on a new trend, it’s vital to measure the long-term benefits of additional devices and how they could positively impact the workplace. Effectively answering this question will help communicate the potential value to leaders in the organization.
  2. Am I aware of security risks and is the company equipped to handle them? New technologies have the potential to introduce security vulnerabilities. Technology leaders must understand – and communicate to other business leaders – the difference in security risk levels with enterprise-provided wearables versus employees’ personal devices and develop plans and policies to match.
  3. Have I prepared a sound policy, communications plan and training strategy around wearable technology at the office? It’s crucial to have a preemptive communications approach that will address any new
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Moolahonly's curator insight, April 28, 2:15 PM

These are the types of wearable devices we would like help get funding on our crowdfunding platform www.moolahonly.com

Moolahonly's curator insight, April 29, 1:09 PM

These are the types of wearable devices we would like help get funding on our crowdfunding platform www.moolahonly.com

 

Please support our Headtalker campaign at http://bit.ly/1EjTMyU

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How Wearable Tech will change your life

How Wearable Tech will change your life | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Where does the public stand with the Internet of Things? It's focused now on Wearable Tech, especially as Wearable Technology crosses into lifestyle and fashion. With that in mind, this infographic appears to focus on where a millennial marketplace will spend its money on the next wave of technology... and not a word about laptops, phones or tech 1.0 here. The sources are listed on the infographic itself (apparently all from 2014), and while the Apple Watch is mentioned it's not actually shown or listed in the infographic. SOURCE: ComputerScienceZone.org
Richard Platt's insight:

Great infographic with lots of references

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Alison Winn's curator insight, April 27, 5:33 AM

A great infographic from Viz Publications outlining how we will all come to embrace wearable technology and the exponential growth within that market.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, April 27, 6:23 PM

Wearables have a lot of applications, especially in the health sector. This infographic paints a picture of a 'wearable future'.