Wearable Tech and...
Follow
Find
10.1K views | +19 today
 
Scooped by Richard Platt
onto Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Scoop.it!

The Alternative to the Samsung Gear - Vybe Offers A Different Take On Wearable Technology - AppAdvice

The Alternative to the Samsung Gear - Vybe Offers A Different Take On Wearable Technology - AppAdvice | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
AppAdvice
Vybe Offers A Different Take On Wearable Technology
AppAdvice
While the wearable technology market has exploded in 2013 with a number of devices mainly focused on fitness and exercise tracking, the Vybe is a little different.
more...
No comment yet.
Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Innovating for Impact: Wearables for Good

Innovating for Impact:  Wearables for Good | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
transportation
Richard Platt's insight:

A wearable built to address social good (or any another good that the market would buy into for that matter) would ultimately need to follow a systemic, communitarian approach. It must be:

  • Cost-effective: Needs to have the capacity to be executed en masse in low-cost areas, with a demonstrated business case and need
  • Rugged and Durable: Waterproof, shockproof, weatherproof, heat resistant, easily stored, and built to last
  • Low-power: Run off a battery, have a long battery life (possibly using alternate energy), and be power efficient where there is no power
  • Scalable: Can be applied to varying environments and communities, sustained by a larger ecosystem, easily produced/developed, easy to use, easy to maintain/fixed by local skill force
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

What Companies Should Ask Before Embracing Wearables

What Companies Should Ask Before Embracing Wearables | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Do wearables invade your employees’ privacy? A recent survey by PwC found that 82% of respondents are worried about privacy when it comes to wearables, generally speaking. So even if your company is able to compel employees to use them, you’re likely to face questions about what information you’re actually obtaining. Will you suddenly have a detailed understanding of what people eat, how much they sleep, how much they drink, and what mood they are in? One very real risk is that some employees will feel that every aspect of their life is being watched, and will make choices — sometimes poor ones — based on this assumption. Another is that managers will consciously or unconsciously start making decisions about staff performance based on irrelevant data about their non-work lives.
Richard Platt's insight:

Do wearables invade your employees’ privacy? A recent survey by PwC found that 82% of respondents are worried about privacy when it comes to wearables, generally speaking. So even if your company is able to compel employees to use them, you’re likely to face questions about what information you’re actually obtaining. Will you suddenly have a detailed understanding of what people eat, how much they sleep, how much they drink, and what mood they are in? One very real risk is that some employees will feel that every aspect of their life is being watched, and will make choices — sometimes poor ones — based on this assumption. Another is that managers will consciously or unconsciously start making decisions about staff performance based on irrelevant data about their non-work lives.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Shop Floor Safety Can Improve with Wearable Technology

Shop Floor Safety Can Improve with Wearable Technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Interesting exploration of a "smart vest" Use Case for a plant network.  -  "Our designers are looking at “safety vests” with embedded sensors that link to the plant network. Location sensors, in a type of intra-plant GPS environment, can track the exact location of the vest and its wearer. A forklift, with a connected display and appropriate software, could then keep track of all pedestrians (equipped with vests) throughout the warehouse. The driver would be able to see (around corners and everywhere) when someone is close by. The vest wearer could also sound an alarm or otherwise to indicate an approaching truck. The warehouse can be one of the most dangerous places in the factory. The IoT safety vest could change that while allowing lift trucks to go faster and be more productive since they wouldn’t have to slow down to avoid non-existent pedestrians (or other trucks).  The smart vest could also house environmental sensors to monitor exposure to hazardous conditions, warning the wearer and logging the event. It could monitor temperature and help workers avoid steam, extreme heat, or other hazards. “Sniffers” could watch for dangerous chemical gasses or radiation with enhanced central monitoring – the vest, after all, will be connected to the plant network so warnings and monitoring go into the log as well as feed local warnings and alerts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Health-Tracking Eyeglasses

Health-Tracking Eyeglasses | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
What if your eyeglasses could track the calories you burn and distance traveled? VSP Global incoming CEO Jim McGrann shows off the spectacles on the News Hub. Photo: YouTube/VSP Vision Care
Richard Platt's insight:

VSP Global's CEO on the WSJ video blog, on how their new glasses that can track calories burned and distance traveled. Housed within the temple of Dragon Alliance frames, the current prototype enables wearers to monitor their stats in real time through the accompanying Android app.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

CUR wearable targets chronic pain offering immediate relief

CUR wearable targets chronic pain offering immediate relief | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Chronic pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined. Now a new wearable aims to restore quality of life for sufferers.
Richard Platt's insight:

Founded in 2013, San Francisco based start-up Cur is launching an intelligent pain-relief wearable that brings TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) technology to chronic pain.  Designed in partnership with the team behind Nike Fuelband, Sonos and Jibo products, The $299 device from Cur attacks chronic pain with the over-the-counter wearable. The device senses muscle vibrations from your body to provide accurate TENS therapy.   TENS works by sending a non painful electrical system to the brain that gets there before the pain signal.

The nerves become confused and the device offers relief from the pain within five seconds.  The stimulation feels like a gentle tingling or light vibrating sensation.  The intensity of the feeling can be adjusted by pressing buttons on the device.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Qualcomm might not make a dedicated wearables chip after all

Qualcomm might not make a dedicated wearables chip after all | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
'We are in the first inning'
Richard Platt's insight:

"This is not a space where we do a chip, throw it over a wall and let it happen," said Pankaj Kedia, Senior director of Qualcomm's smart wearables segment. "It's the wrong way to think about it: do I leverage a phone chip or do I want to do my own chip?  -  "The right way to think of it is, what kind of user experience do I want to deliver here?". Kedia's point was that the wearables category is much broader than smartphones. Smartglasses will have higher GPU and camera demands than a watch; a 3G-enabled wearable will have different needs to one that requires a phone connection.  -  Qualcomm has used its chips in many of the Android Wear devices to date, but for the time being it makes more sense to offer manufacturers the choice of chip from its existing portfolio rather than produce its own 'wearable'-labelled offering.  As Kedia put it, this is the "first inning" of wearables. People are testing the waters, trying ideas and discovering what works and what doesn't.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

'Sinister' and 'Orwellian': BioBeats founder Warns of the Dark side of Wearables and Biometrics

'Sinister' and 'Orwellian': BioBeats founder Warns of the Dark side of Wearables and Biometrics | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The man behind the heartbeat-reading startup has warned of the potential abuses of the new technology.
Richard Platt's insight:

David Plans speaking at a Conference in London described how he went from making the Pulse app as "a gimmick" for tech festival South by Southwest (SXSW) 2013 to a new device being trialled in UK hospitals: the Breathing Stone. Co-developed by the University of Bath, the Breathing Stone is a handheld medical device that records your heart rate and breathing and generates music to ease anxiety. The potential advantages of medical devices are exciting both for patients and for healthcare providers: Plans envisages that, "if you know a nonagenarian is going to have stroke in two weeks you can deal with that without hospitalising them; and hospitalising them costs the National Health Service a huge amount of money."  


Plans worries some organisations are more interested in using wearables and the data they collect for "sinister purposes". In a twist he describes as "Orwellian", he claims that "some of the insurance providers we work with want to calculate insurance premiums in real-time," which he sees as problematic.  He notes that "while some of the aspects of biometric data gathering from wearables may at first seem surveillance-like and therefore Orwellian in nature, they offer very clear and potentially life-saving advantages to human life and the provision of care. This means that whilst we have a lot of work to do to ensure privacy, security and choice for people and their data, we also have a tremendous amount of potential health benefit to deliver."


And wearables are not just for patients, says Plans, as they could also be used to monitor and protect caregivers and other workers. Plans suggests a wearable device that monitors health and tiredness could answer questions like, "Should this nurse be on duty? Should this paramedic be in this ambulance? Are they too fatigued?


"Is this soldier able to judge whether that child who may be carrying a bomb should be shot?" he continues. "This kind of decision-making happens a lot, especially in the Israeli army, who have some very interesting opinions about what should go in a biometric helmet."


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from MarketingHits
Scoop.it!

Browsing the web on an Apple Watch is the worst user experience ever

Browsing the web on an Apple Watch is the worst user experience ever | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Yearning to browse the web directly from your wrist on Apple Watch's tiny 1.32-inch screen? You're not alone. A developer known by the nickname Comex has somehow managed to run a fully-fledged web browser on an Apple Watch.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

Apple Watch and The Future of App Design

Apple Watch and The Future of App Design | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The launch of the Apple Watch represents the latest proof point that we’re only going to have more devices to consider when designing mobile apps. Not only..

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

The fact that Apple Watch is designed to be used alongside an iPhone raises another important consideration – your users will not experience your application in isolation on a single a device. They will likely pick and choose the device to interact with, moving from one to another, to meet their needs at a given point in time.  -  As such, it becomes really important to think about system-based design – that is, spending time up-front on a project, considering all the different touch points that your users will engage with your application, and creating a set of related experiences that are clearly designed as one, but that take advantage of and are contextual to each of the device form factors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

This story is all about the quantified selfie

This story is all about the quantified selfie | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Forget about strapping a Fitbit to your wrist. The next generation of activity/health trackers will need to be swallowed.
Richard Platt's insight:

Smarr keeps track of more than 150 parameters. Some, such as his heartbeat, movement and whether he's sitting, standing or lying down, he measures continuously in real time with a wireless gadget on his belt. Some, such as his weight, he logs daily. Others, such as his blood and the bacteria in his intestines, he tests only about once every month.  -  Smarr compares the way he treats his body with how people monitor and maintain their cars: "We know exactly how much gas we have, the engine temperature, how fast we are going. What I'm doing is creating a dashboard for my body."

One weekday afternoon in his lab, Smarr studied his life on an 5.5-by-2.5-metre monitor that spans most of the room. On the board were 150 key variables about his body over a 10-year period, displayed in coloured rectangles. Most were green, meaning they fall within the expected, healthy range. But some were yellow (one to 10 times outside the healthy range), and a handful were red (10 to 100 times outside the healthy range).  -  Once, Smarr was most renowned as the head of the research lab where Marc Andreessen developed the web browser in the early 1990s.   -  Now 66, Smarr is the unlikely hero of a global movement among ordinary people to "quantify" themselves using wearable fitness gadgets, medical equipment, headcams, traditional lab tests and homemade contraptions, all with the goal of finding ways to optimise their bodies and minds to live longer, healthier lives - and perhaps to discover some important truth about themselves and their purpose in life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Why so many Apple Watch apps suck

Why so many Apple Watch apps suck | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It's not the tiny screen, it's the upload time.
Richard Platt's insight:

It’s not the tiny screen, it’s the upload time.  On the front page of Sunday’s New York Times travel section, Stephanie Rosenbloom tells a story about the first time she tried to order a Uber ride through the company’s Apple Watch app. The app seemed to be frozen — until it wasn’t.  “Suddenly,” she writes, “it was ordering me car after car in what seemed like a digital-age version of the ‘I Love Lucy’ candy factory episode.”   Welcome to the world of first-generation third-party apps, the ones giving the Apple Watch a bad name. I’m not the only early user who’s complained about how slow and buggy they seemed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Amid the flood of wearable devices, a movement to quantify lifestyles is evolving into big business

Amid the flood of wearable devices, a movement to quantify lifestyles is evolving into big business | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Spearheaded by the flood of wearable devices, a movement to quantify consumers’ lifestyles is evolving into big business with immense health and privacy ramifications
Richard Platt's insight:

Critics point to the brouhaha in 2011, when some owners of Fitbit exercise sensors noticed that their sexual activity — including information about the duration of an episode and whether it was “passive, light effort” or “active and vigorous” — was being publicly shared by default.  -  They worry that wearables will be used as “black boxes” for a person’s body in legal matters. Three years ago, after a San Francisco cyclist struck and killed a 71-year-old pedestrian, prosecutors obtained his data from Strava, a GPS-enabled fitness tracker, to show he had been speeding and blew through several stop signs before the accident. More recently, a Calgary law firm is trying to use Fitbit data as evidence of injuries a client sustained in a car crash.  -  More sophisticated tools in development, such as a smartphone app that analyzes a bipolar person’s voice to predict a manic episode, and injectables and implants that test the blood, offer greater medical benefit but also pose greater risks.  -  Des Spence, a general practitioner in the United Kingdom, argues that unnecessary monitoring is creating in­cred­ible anxiety among today’s “unhealthily health-obsessed” trackers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Apple Watch’s Heart Rate Sensor As Good As Mio's Alpha

Apple Watch’s Heart Rate Sensor As Good As Mio's Alpha | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The performance of the heart rate sensor app on the Apple Watch is almost in line with that of the the Mio’s dedicated Alpha monitor, claims Mac and iOS developer Brad Larson. The comparison was done
Richard Platt's insight:

Almost similar results:  The data shown by both devices was almost same, even though the Alpha showed some of the sharper peaks, says the expert. Both wearables run on optical sensors that use reflected light to gauge blood flow. According to Larson, the sensor on the watch collected readings after every 5 seconds while in workout mode, slowing after every 10 minutes in regular use.

Apple was recently in dispute when it confirmed that the watch might measure inappropriate data for those with tattoos as it uses optical technology. There was a support page developed to show that the ink, pattern and saturation of some tattoos can make it difficult for the watch to read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The truth about wearables and health insurance

The truth about wearables and health insurance | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, mobile devices and wearables have been passively or actively tracking a huge amount of personal data about us. Equipped with sensors from heart-rate tracking to GPS, they routinely capture all kinds of metrics and store them whether we like it or not. When it comes to matters of health, insurance…
Richard Platt's insight:

Over the last year Oscar New York insurance company started supplying customers with a Misfit Flash and offered users $1 credit every time they hit their step goal, with rewards in Amazon vouchers of up to $250 a year.  -  Then came John Hancock, which offers its users Fitbits and the potential to earn 15% off their premiums for hitting targets. The potential for growing customers with this attractive offer led the company's CEO to tell the New York Times that this new model could "reinvent" the "no-growth insurance industry."  -  It's no wonder the insurance companies are jumping on the wearable bandwagon, but has there been evidence that these nudges towards healthy attitudes have worked?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable technology may improve sleep, endurance and chronic pain

Wearable technology may improve sleep, endurance and chronic pain | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Sixty-three-year-old David Baker made a living driving tractor trailers in the South for 40 years. 
Richard Platt's insight:

Excellent example of a Use Case of wearable technology being applied for Parkinson's patients - pretty amazing stuff, in particular if you've ever seen anyone with Parkinson's the use of a bracelet infused with pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMFT).  PEMF works by pulsing electromagnetic waves through the body to increase blood flow and reduce inflammation. PEMFT has been approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for decades, but Active Edge said its products are the first to offer these health benefits via wearable technology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

ARM and Unicef team up on wearables for the developing world

ARM and Unicef team up on wearables for the developing world | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The organizations kick off a multiyear partnership by announcing a design contest to create potentially life-saving wearable devices.
Richard Platt's insight:

Unicef Innovation, which works on technologies to advance Unicef's work with women and children, hopes designers will come up with wearables that could alert people of fires, diagnose health needs, encourage behavioral changes such as washing hands, and track data in real time like the vitals of a mother and her fetus, Kochi said. Many of these wearables could be used in refugee camps or remote areas that are far from major infrastructure or medical facilities.   In addition to the design challenge, ARM plans to help Unicef fast-track some of its pilot technology projects, offering several million dollars in funding, as well as its technological know-how and connections to the broader tech world. For instance, ARM could help Unicef Innovation's efforts to provide power in Burundi, treat HIV and AIDS in Zambia or create jobs in Kosovo. Longer term, the two organizations also plan to research potential business opportunities in developing countries -- looking into transportation, education, wearables and other areas -- in hopes of spurring on more investment in those regions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Prediction: 12 million wearable patches will ship in 2020

Prediction: 12 million wearable patches will ship in 2020 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Tractica describes the category as including “patches, tattoos, or small devices that are affixed to the skin and worn for a limited period of time, ranging from an hour to several weeks” and adds that “the patches also have an element of wireless connectivity, and have a medical, health, or wellness purpose that can range from monitoring physiological data to delivering medication.”  -  That could include Proteus Digital Health‘s medication management and adherence system, which includes sensor-enabled pills, a peel-and-stick biometric sensor patch worn on the body, and companion smartphone apps. It could also include Vital Connect’s HealthPatch MD, the LifeWatch Vital Signs Patch, Fitlinxx’s AmpStrip, iRhythm’s Zio Patch, or SensiumVitals devices from UK company Toumaz, which made $1 million off peel-and-stick vitals sensors last year. It could also include peel-and-stick thermometers for tracking fertility or managing temperature in young children.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Unlocking the secret of the "Tommy John" injury

Unlocking the secret of the "Tommy John"  injury | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The idea of using wearable technology to help athletes with injuries isn’t a new concept. For example, the San Antonio Spurs has used a company called Catapult Sports to help its “older” roster maintain a competitive edge. The data from that technology allows teams to establish benchmarks of what a healthy performance is in order to compare that to a performance while a player is recovering.
Richard Platt's insight:

“The mThrow sleeve gathers 3D biomechanical data of the pitcher’s throwing arm,” Joe Nolan, Co-Founder and CEO of Motus Global, explained. “The most important measurement is the force being imparted to the UCL, which is analyzed by using a proprietary computation centered on a cumulative workload that takes into account factors such as throwing volume and stress on the ligament (newton metres of torque and deciphering between high and low effort throws).”  -  Motus Global has been working with MLB clients for nearly four years in conjunction with the American Sports Medicine Institute. Nolan explained that while the data was valuable for teams and players, it was often only measured once or twice a year. Without dynamic data flowing through during the year, it was only a small snapshot that didn’t accurately tell the whole story.  -  So far, the general consensus in the medical community as to what causes this type of injury is still overuse. According to Nolan, that hypothesis is still very vague.  -  “We are working to quantify what type of workload constitutes overuse,” Nolan said. “Moreover, we are looking at the epidemic at all levels, from Little League to MLB. With enough data and trends we hope to be in a position to answer that question.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

McLaren creating wearable gadget to end Jet Lag

McLaren creating wearable gadget to end Jet Lag | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Formula 1 team McLaren are focused on bringing an end to jet lag with their own innovation in wearable technology.
Richard Platt's insight:

The team at McLaren Applied Technologies (MAT) believes that wearables in the future will be able to monitor you vital signs and help you to adapt your behaviour to deal with the stress of flying more effectively.  “Everyone just accepts that when they travel by air, they’ll feel slightly peculiar when they arrive at their destination,” he said. “What we’re imagining developing is a scenario where you can turn that on its head – we’ll get people to think about the condition in which they’d like to arrive somewhere, and then make it possible for them to achieve this.”  -  The device would operate by collecting information about the wearer over a period of time, and then predicting the best way for them to travel.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from WEARABLES - INSIDABLES - IOT - CONNECTED DEVICES - QUANTIFIEDSELF
Scoop.it!

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Digital medicine is poised to transform biomedical research, clinical practice and the commercial sector. Here we introduce a monthly column from R&D/venture creation firm PureTech tracking digital medicine's emergence.

 

Technology has already transformed the social fabric of life in the twenty-first century. It is now poised to profoundly influence disease management and healthcare. Beyond the hype of the 'mobile health' and 'wearable technology' movement, the ability to monitor our bodies and continuously gather data about human biology suggests new possibilities for both biomedical research and clinical practice. Just as the Human Genome Project ushered in the age of high-throughput genotyping, the ability to automate, continuously record, analyze and share standardized physiological and biological data augurs the beginning of a new era—that of high-throughput human phenotyping.

 

These advances are prompting new approaches to research and medicine, but they are also raising questions and posing challenges for existing healthcare delivery systems. How will these technologies alter biomedical research approaches, what types of experimental questions will researchers now be able to ask and what types of training will be needed? Will the ability to digitize individual characteristics and communicate by mobile technology empower patients and enable the modification of disease-promoting behaviors; at the same time, will it threaten patient privacy? Will doctors be prescribing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared apps on a regular basis, not just to monitor and manage chronic disease but also to preempt acute disease episodes? Will the shift in the balance between disease treatment and early intervention have a broad economic impact on the healthcare system? How will the emergence of these new technologies reshape the healthcare industry and its underlying business models? What will be the defining characteristics of 'winning' products and companies?

 

These are just some of the questions we plan to ask over the coming months. In the meantime, we introduce here some of the key themes shaping R&D in the digital medicine field and focus on what they might mean for the biopharmaceutical and diagnostic/device industries.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Sandra Boyer, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
Risto Suoknuuti's curator insight, May 17, 4:23 AM

Man made machines for mans use. Systems simplyfies after getting complex. This is the rule in the winning game.

Ed Crowley's curator insight, May 17, 8:30 AM

Wearable medical technology is quickly changing the potential for health research, and with IoT, health management. 

Be-Bound®'s curator insight, May 18, 9:54 AM

And this is just the beginning ! 

Rescooped by Richard Platt from Future Business Technology
Scoop.it!

Identity, Control, Safety: The next generation of Wearable Tech

Identity, Control, Safety: The next generation of Wearable Tech | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Identity, control, safety – these are the three areas where wearable technology will evolve in its next generation, according to Sonny VU, CEO of wearables company Misfit. “Right now, in a current world of wearables, we’re still very much in a 1.0 world”, he says.”If you think about it, the use cases for wearables right …

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Identity, control, safety – these are the three areas where wearable technology will evolve in its next generation, according to Sonny VU, CEO of wearables company Misfit. “Right now, in a current world of wearables, we’re still very much in a 1.0 world”, he says.”If you think about it, the use cases for wearables right …

more...
Moolahonly's curator insight, May 8, 1:27 PM

These are the types of wearable devices we would like help get funding on our crowdfunding platform www.moolahonly.com

 

Please support our Headtalker campaign at http://bit.ly/1EjTMyU

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

China's military warns troops wearable tech poses security risk

China's military warns troops wearable tech poses security risk | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Ditch the smartwatches and intelligent glasses, military mouthpiece tells soldiers - the enemy could be pinpointing your location with them
Richard Platt's insight:

Leave your smartwatches and fitness trackers at home, the military has told its soldiers - the enemy can tap into such devices and pinpoint troop location or take photos and recordings that can be sent over the internet.  -  The warning, which was carried in the military's PLA Daily mouthpiece, comes amid a push by the mainland to bolster cybersecurity and eliminate security threats potentially posed by foreign-owned technology.   -  Intelligent glasses that come equipped with a high-definition camera and microphone can shoot photos, record videos and independently process data, which all could be used to discover the military's whereabouts, the Daily cited unnamed army experts as saying.   -  Smart wristbands, such as fitness trackers, also pose a danger to soldiers. The devices can detect and track activity throughout the day and automatically put the information in the cloud on the internet, it said.  -  Some wearable devices could also be used to establish a wireless network. The PLA maintains an independent network that is isolated from the public internet, according to the Daily. Access to an outside network was strictly controlled and only permitted using highly encrypted connections.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

6 things Android Wear smartwatches can do that the Apple Watch can't

6 things Android Wear smartwatches can do that the Apple Watch can't | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google's Android Wear 5.1.1 gives Android Wear smartwatches a slight edge over the Apple Watch in terms of useful features.
Richard Platt's insight:

Top 3 reasons (1) Custom Watch Face, (2) Always-on app (soon) (3) Works over any Wi-Fi network - whereas you need to have the iPhone and Apple Watch connected to the same network, you always have to carry both.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Insurance firms adopting wearables to get closer to customers, says Accenture

Insurance firms adopting wearables to get closer to customers, says Accenture | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Sixty-three percent of survey repsondents believe that wearable technologies will be
Richard Platt's insight:

"While insurers have traditionally based their underwriting and pricing processes on a limited view of certain customer variables, emerging technologies such as wearables and other connected devices can help insurers break from their traditional business models and provide outcome-based services for their customers," said John Cusano, senior managing director of Accenture's global insurance practice.   -  "For instance, one leading insurer recently announced that it will provide new policyholders with a free fitness band to track their health progress - and then reward their healthy living with a reduction in life insurance premiums."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The BBC Reviews Apple v Android: Which watch wins after week of wear?

The BBC Reviews Apple v Android: Which watch wins after week of wear? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Many young people do not wear any kind of watch - but will smartwatches change that? BBC Click's Dave Lee puts them on trial.
Richard Platt's insight:

Great analysis and video, worthwhile to watch the comparison

more...
No comment yet.