Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Wearable Technology on show - Scoop.co.nz (press release)

Wearable Technology on show - Scoop.co.nz (press release) | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Scoop.co.nz (press release) Wearable Technology on show Scoop.co.nz (press release) Illuminated gloves for the hearing impaired and an on-stage visual extravaganza are among projects from Victoria University's Wearable Technology course to be...
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More cool wearables 

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Real time coach tracker

Real time coach tracker | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Taking activity tracking to the next level, real time coach tracker
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Wearables finally starting to create products that can actually coach you while you're running - Moov.  Still I would say that is a narrow market niche and isn't some huge financial or technological capability that no other wearable firm couldn't do (not protect-able IP) or thought possible or couldn't do.  But at least one of these wearable products has begun to reach the market with a use case that actually has a market to sell to.  

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Silver nanowire and hydrogel make high-tech winter gloves

Silver nanowire and hydrogel make high-tech winter gloves | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
New fabrics in development by the US military promise to keep hands warm and dry in extreme conditions, reports Andrew Masterson.
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Research by Paola D’Angelo and a team based at the US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Centre in Massachusetts look into cold-weather glove development.

D’Angelo and her colleagues are working on incorporating heat-transmitting silver nanowires into fabrics such as polyester and cotton-nylon amalgams.  The scientists report that applying the low-voltage output of a watch battery to the augmented textiles raises its temperature by around 36 degrees Celsius in under a minute.  To create proof-of-concept fabrics, the researchers built on the work of Stanford University’s Yi Cui, who has published several papers exploring the use of electrically conductive silver nanowires in flexible substrates.  Gloves that grow out of the work of D’Angelo and her team will also incorporate an absorbent hydrogel, ensuring sweat is rapidly removed.

The team also reports that the new fabric withstands repeated washing without loss of efficiency – a problem that currently plagues most items of wearable tech.  Once replacement gloves for the military have been rolled out, the next target is clothing for torsos and legs. The scientists says that at some stage the silver nanowire fabrics are likely to cross over into commercial development – something that may well please many a mountaineer.

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Global Smart Wearable Gloves Market to Grow at a CAGR of 15.27% to 2021

Global Smart Wearable Gloves Market to Grow at a CAGR of 15.27% to 2021 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
MarketResearchNest.com adds "Global Smart Wearable Gloves Market 2017-2021" new report to its research database. The report spread across 76 pages
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Research analysts forecast the global smart wearable gloves market to grow at a CAGR of 15.27% during the period 2017-2021.

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Woman Gives Birth To First Baby Conceived Using 'FitBit Fertility Tracker'

Woman Gives Birth To First Baby Conceived Using 'FitBit Fertility Tracker' | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Technology is a wonderful thing.
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The fertility tracker works much like a FitBit, hence the nickname "FitBit for Fertility." The bracelet contains sensors that track physical symptoms, such as heart rate, breathing and body temperature. Women wear the device while they sleep and the next day, the bracelet (which connects to a phone app) predicts their most fertile days.  After just three months of wearing the bracelet, McGee conceived her baby boy.

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Keyboard Kimura Reviews: PIQ Robot Blue wearable punch-tracker

Keyboard Kimura Reviews: PIQ Robot Blue wearable punch-tracker | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Everlast and PIQ Sport Intelligence have teamed up to bring wearable technology to the boxing world.
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In recent years, the basic tallies used to measure success and an athlete’s performance have began to expand as advanced analytics have taken hold on the basketball court, the baseball diamond, the hockey ice surface and countless other fields of play.  In many cases, the information gleaned from that data helps shape the work that is done in the practice facility, where inefficiencies are examined and time is committed to addressing weaknesses and building on strengths.   In the combat sports arena, a new product is offering athletes a way analyze their boxing skills.  Everlast and PIQ Sport Intelligence have teamed up to produce the PIQ Robot Blue, a wearable nano-computer that tracks punch types, speed and impact of every punch thrown during a training session. Whether strapped around boxing gloves while working the heavy bag or worn as wraps while shadowboxing, the PIQ Robot Blue records each punch and gives users a detailed look at their performance via the downloadable Everlast PIQ app.  While this type of technology has not yet made its way into the boxing ring or mixed martial arts cages, it has the potential to become a valuable piece of equipment in the training room as coaches and athletes can track the progress being made on a session-by-session basis.

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Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro likely gets confirmed; Gear Sport clears FCC

Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro likely gets confirmed; Gear Sport clears FCC | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro likely gets confirmed by the official Samsung website listing. The Gear Sport, which is an upcoming wearable device clears the FCC.
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According to a report by SamMobile, none of the details about the Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro are known as yet but the device is believed to feature a design that is similar to that of the standard Gear Fit 2. There are speculations that this one might feature enhanced step-tracking accuracy. There are claims that the device might be made official around the end of this month along with the Galaxy Note 8. A different report by SamMobile has spilled the beans about its upcoming wearable device. It looks like the next hybrid smartwatch from Samsung will be called Gear Sport. The device was spotted visiting the FCC with features such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support but the other details remain unknown. From the FCC documentation, a schematic of how the wearable device might look like has been revealed. The Gear Sport appears to resemble the existing Samsung Gear smartwatches in terms of design with a round form factor. However, it is suggested that the Samsung Gear Sport is meant to bridge the gap that exists between a fitness tracker and a smartwatch.

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Seven Health Technologies To Watch For In The Future

Seven Health Technologies To Watch For In The Future | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

How tech is helping the health industry disarm disease.

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Interesting list, worth a look on How tech is helping the health industry disarm disease. 

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Global Smart Wearable Healthcare Devices Market Growth of 20% CAGR by 2022 - Analysis, Technologies & Forecasts Report 2017-2022

Global Smart Wearable Healthcare Devices Market Growth of 20% CAGR by 2022 - Analysis, Technologies & Forecasts Report 2017-2022 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Smart Wearable Healthcare Devices Market – Premium Insight of Latest Report Wearable technology (also called wearable gadgets) is a category of technology
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This report highlights the manufacturing cost structure includes the cost of the materials, labor cost, depreciation cost, and the cost of manufacturing procedures. The report is assembled with the determination of providing necessary market information to retailers operating in the Global market. Hence, thus makes for a resourceful data repository that can help decision makers comprehend the most effective business strategies.

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Wearable sensor technology helps local athletes recover from injuries

Wearable sensor technology helps local athletes recover from injuries | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Australian sensor technology used by several professional sports leagues in the U.S. is being used by SSM Healthcare in Creve Coeur. dorsaVi is wireless technology that tracks and measures in real time how elite athletes move, providing valuable information during recovery from sports injuries.
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Australian sensor technology used by several professional sports leagues in the U.S. is being used by SSM Healthcare in Creve Coeur. dorsaVi is wireless technology that tracks and measures in real time how elite athletes move, providing valuable information during recovery from sports injuries.

Lauren Nuelle was living her dream, playing college soccer at Webster University, until three knee surgeries cost her two years of eligibility. “My first ACL tear, I tore in 2015. It was a non-contact tear. I planted my foot, tried to run and I heard a pop,” said Nuelle. “I’ve torn it twice since.”  Recently Nuelle worked out with SSM Healthcare sports therapists, with dorsVi sensors attached to both legs. As she performed squats, lunges, and jumps in every direction, the sensors sent instant information to an app displayed on a tablet, measuring how close she was to returning to soccer action.   “Numbers to look at to see and give us a better idea if these athletes are safe to return to play, or just an injury risk profile from the preventive side of it as well,” said Caroline Jaycox, a board certified sports therapist with SSM Healthcare.

Sports therapist Sara Wallingsford discussed the dorsaVi data with Nuelle. “This test is telling me that her left [leg] is actually better than her right after all this training after her few surgeries.”

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Alejandro Buldón's curator insight, August 11, 10:37 AM
Wearable sensor tech helps athletes recover from injuries
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Is it legal to microchip employees? 

Human resources jobs, news & events
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What does this technology mean for employees?  First, while the technology and the methods are changing, it is unlikely that we will lose the employee safeguards we currently have in place. It is more likely that, as with the development of the internet and other wearable technologies (such as the Apple Watch and Fitbits), these will be adapted.  Even now, employers have the right to monitor the activities of their employees via CCTV, checking email and internet usage, and even obtaining information from credit reference agencies or about previous convictions. That said, there is stringent data protection legislation in place that sets out rules on how this should be carried out and how personal information is stored.  As a general rule, where employers intend to monitor staff they should consult them and fully inform them of the arrangements, making sure they are clear that the arrangements are necessary.  An employer has an implied duty of trust and confidence to all members of its workforce so monitoring that is too oppressive, or excessive and unnecessarily intrusive, is a breach of data protection. In some extreme cases it can amount to constructive dismissal and bullying.

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FIFA looks to integrate fitness technology in official soccer games

FIFA looks to integrate fitness technology in official soccer games | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
FIFA looks to integrate fitness technology in official soccer games
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FIFA looks to integrate fitness technology in official soccer games

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Xiaomi overtakes Apple in global wearable technology market

Xiaomi overtakes Apple in global wearable technology market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Xiaomi has overtaken the US-based Fitbit and Apple in global wearable market by capturing 17 per cent share of the total 22 million units that were shipped in the second quarter this year.
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Xiaomi has overtaken the US-based Fitbit and Apple in global wearable technology market by capturing 17 per cent share of the total 22 million units that were shipped in the second quarter this year.  According to a research by Strategy Analytics on Thursday, global wearables shipments rose eight per cent annually from 20 million in second quarter last year.  Strong demand for low-cost fitnessbands in China and premium smartwatches across the US drove the uptick.   "Xiaomi captured 17 per cent global marketshare and overtook Fitbit and Apple to become the world's largest wearables vendor. Fitbit is at risk of being trapped in a pincer movement between the low-end fitnessbands sold by Xiaomi and the fitness-led, high-end smartwatches sold by Apple," said Neil Mawston, Executive Director at Strategy Analytics.

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Are creepy-crawly clothing robots the future of fashion?

Are creepy-crawly clothing robots the future of fashion? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
​Last year we saw a new direction for wearable electronics – mini-robots that could roam over a person’s body. Now the team has refined the technology with the launch of Project Kino that explores ways these kinetic wearables could open up new aesthetic and functional clothing possibilities.
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These tiny robots can navigate over a person's clothes through a magnetic drive system. The magnet underneath the fabric holds the robot in place regardless of its orientation, while the robot can be controlled either autonomously or externally by the wearer.  

The bots also can act as pattern-changing devices, shifting around a wearer's chest to create moving geometric effects. Other aesthetic experiments involved etching patterns onto fabrics that leave visible tracks, such as velvet, and creating shape-changing garments that can morph into different forms.

Functionally the robots could also act as on-body microphones or climate-reactive clothing that adapts to the surrounding environment. One of the examples proposed was a robot controlling a scarf or the drawstrings on a hood.

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Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors

Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
From smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest 'must-have' technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world's most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor a slew of body functions.
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Body sensors, which are usually made with semiconductors, have shown great potential for monitoring human health. But they have limitations. For instance, strain sensors, which measure changes in force, cannot be highly sensitive and highly stretchable at the same time. Silk, a natural material that is stronger than steel and more flexible than nylon, could overcome these problems. The fiber is also lightweight and bio-compatible. However, silk doesn't conduct electricity very well. To address this challenge, Zhang and colleagues at Tsinghua University in China sought to find a way to boost the conductivity of silk so it could be successfully used in body-sensing devices.  "There is a whole world of possibilities for silk sensors at the moment. Silk is the ideal material for fabricating sensors that are worn on the body," Yingying Zhang, Ph.D., says. "One possibility we foresee is for them to be used as an integrated wireless system that would allow doctors to more easily monitor patients remotely so that they can respond to their medical needs more rapidly than ever before."

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New wearable predicts if you’re getting flu

New wearable predicts if you’re getting flu | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A new type of wearable thermometer allows researchers to gather data to make predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks. The device sends data to the Thermia online health educational tool.
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The new way of tracking and predicting flu outbreaks is an example of how hospitals create with technology which can be commercialized. With the new development – a wearable thermometer - the Thermia online health educational tool was developed at Boston Children's Hospital. The system, when tested out, predicted seasonal influenza outbreaks in China one month earlier than ahead of conventional epidemiological tracking.   The development is one of the first examples where an integrated wearable device and online tool has been used to successfully predict a disease outbreak. This type of data is of benefit to health services and governments in terms of planning for and responding to major health emergencies.   According to lead researcher Yulin Hswen: "The fact that we were able to predict influenza outbreaks faster than China's national surveillance programs really shows the capacity for everyday, wearable digital health devices to track the spread of disease at the population level.”   With the technology, the Thermia platform is a fever educational tool which can operate as a standalone digital application or it can collect temperature data via a wearable device called the iThermonitor. This is a type of patch-like medical device affixed under the arm. Bluetooth technology links the iThermonitor to a smartphone or tablet, allowing the user to continuously and quietly monitor the wearer’s temperature via an iOS or Android App.

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6 Wearable Tech Pieces That Actually Look Good

6 Wearable Tech Pieces That Actually Look Good | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
This isn’t just gonna be another post about, like, Apple Watches. I know y’all already know about those.
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here are some of the snazziest looking pieces of wearable technology I could find — and no, this isn’t just gonna be another post about, like, Apple Watches. I know y’all already know about those.

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Japanese research group develops wearable sensor that stays on the skin for a week

Japanese research group develops wearable sensor that stays on the skin for a week | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Tokyo's graduate School of Engineering have created a tattoo-style sensor that can be comfortably worn for up to a week.
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The super-light and ultra-thin patch could potentially be used for continual health monitoring for both patients and athletes, offering an alternative to more invasive devices.  Designed to be hypoallergenic, the sensor can be worn for longer than similar stick-ons – such as MIT's gold-leaf temporary tattoos that can control electronics remotely.  This is because of the nanoscale mesh the electrode is made from, which includes a water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and a gold layer – chosen because it's known to be biologically compatible.  The patches are placed on the skin and sprayed with water, dissolving the PVA and allowing the wearable's gold threads to seamlessly attach to the contours, pores and ridges of human skin. Because it's breathable, it avoids the skin irritation created by other wearables with a non-dissolvable layer.

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Can a week of wearables improve your health?

Can a week of wearables improve your health? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Thousands of wearable devices hit the market each year aiming to help you live a healthier life. CNN's Samuel Burke spent a week testing a few to discover what difference they can make.
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On top of my Fitbit, I'm also putting the "brain sensing" meditation headband Muse on my head five minutes a day.  I'm also trying out the CheckMe health monitor, a small device which can check for more things than I ever care to know I may have. Among its capabilities is its role as a sleep monitor, thermometer and even an electrocardiogram (ECG) monitor.  Next, I strap the Muse to my head which, from the outset, was the device I was most skeptical about. I have a hard time believing this headband can really read my brain waves.
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Ensuring soldier welfare

Ensuring soldier welfare | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
From rifles that can track targets to providing battlefield monitoring via augmented reality, the military is seriously engaging with wearable technology to help improve its capabilities.
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The drivers behind the adoption of wearable technology applications are varied but one key application is using this technology to monitor a soldier’s physical condition. By employing sensors it is possible to both optimize the well-being of the soldier or, should they be wounded in action or injured in training, sensing injuries and relaying pertinent medical data back to medical support services.  Figures show that every year fatalities are being recorded, many of which are preventable. The protection of service personnel, whether during training or on active duty, is now seen as a priority by the military.

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Flexible batteries power the future of wearable technology

Flexible batteries power the future of wearable technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The rapid development of wearable technology has received another boost from a new development using graphene for printed electronic devices.
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The current hurdle with wearable technology is how to power devices without the need for cumbersome battery packs. Devices known as supercapacitors are one way to achieve this. A supercapacitor acts similarly to a battery but allows for rapid charging which can fully charge devices in seconds.  Now a solid-state flexible supercapacitor device has been demonstrated by using conductive graphene-oxide ink to print onto cotton fabric. As reported in the journal 2-D Materials the printed electrodes exhibited excellent mechanical stability due to the strong interaction between the ink and textile substrate.  Further development of graphene-oxide printed supercapacitors could turn the vast potential of wearable technology into the norm. High-performance sportswear that monitors performance, embedded health-monitoring devices, lightweight military gear, new classes of mobile communication devices and even wearable computers are just some of the applications that could become available following further research and development.  To power these new wearable devices, the energy storage system must have reasonable mechanical flexibility in addition to high energy and power density, good operational safety, long cycling life and be low cost.

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Xiaomi overtakes Apple to lead wearable band market 

Xiaomi overtakes Apple to lead wearable band market  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Apple fell to third place with 2.7 million shipments.

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Xiaomi overtook Apple in the global wearable band market in Q2, according to an industry analyst.  The market grew 8 percent year on year in the second quarter, Canalys said in a research report.  Xiaomi topped the market with shipments of 3.5 million units, closely followed by U.S. firm Fitbit, which shipped 3.3 million units, a 34-percent year-on-year decline, Canalys estimated. Apple fell to third place with 2.7 million shipments.

The smartwatch market will grow in H2, driven by cellular-enabled smarwatches, with 12 million units forecast to be shipped by the end of the year, according to the report.  Xiaomi also posted record-high quarterly smartphone sales in the second quarter and aims to ship 100 million smartphones in 2018.

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Fossil’s struggles with wearables sends shares plummeting 25%

Fossil’s struggles with wearables sends shares plummeting 25% | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Fossil’s shares tanked after second-quarter earnings showing that the company’s wearables business still hasn’t taken off.
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Fossil’s FOSL, -25.08% second-quarter losses were narrower than expected, but the numbers disappointed, with shares down 25% in Wednesday trading.  The company’s wearables business didn’t deliver as anticipated, Fossil executives say.  [W]e had, going into the year, a fairly ambitious program to drive our wearables business, recognizing that the first half of the year was largely going to be dependent upon last year’s product,” said Dennis Secor, Fossil’s chief financial officer, on the company’s earnings call, according to a FactSet transcript. “[W]e have not seen the sell-throughs that we had anticipated.”

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Hong Kong ‘smart’ ring aims to help the visually impaired

Hong Kong ‘smart’ ring aims to help the visually impaired | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

HONG KONG, Aug 5 — A voice in your ear at the touch of a hand?

The Orii ring allows people to take phone calls, handle text messages and interact with a phone’s digital assistant, all by | Tech/Gadgets | Malay Mail Online
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The Orii ring allows people to take phone calls, handle text messages and interact with a phone’s digital assistant, all by transferring sound to a user’s ear through bone conduction.

The ring, designed by Hong Kong-based start-up Origami Labs, was inspired by Peter Wong, the visually impaired father of the firm’s co-founder Kevin Wong.  “As a visual-impaired person, I rely on the software on the smartphone to read the icons, the texts to me,” said Peter Wong, who is a technical adviser for the ring.  A key feature ensures that only the user can hear the information conveyed by the ring.  “Can you imagine it reading out your password? That’s inconvenient and inappropriate,’ Peter Wong said.  What began as a Kickstarter project has become the latest example of wearable, screen-free technology.

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Amid opioid crisis, some patients turn to drug-free tech wearables

Amid opioid crisis, some patients turn to drug-free tech wearables | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Patients are turning to technology as an opioid alternative.
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As an opioid alternative, Mr. Nipple found a clinical trial through Facebook to test a wearable device called the Sprint PNS System from startup SPR Therapeutics.  The device uses small electrical pulses to stimulate nerves, providing patients targeted pain relief without drugs, surgery, anesthesia or a permanent implant. Nipple was among a small group of people who wore the device for about 8 weeks in 2015.    The wearable stimulator, which is about the size of an Apple Watch, is attached to the skin via a patch. It connects to a thread-like wire, which delivers the electrical pulses. It's inserted by a physician near the nerves causing pain.  The wire is removed at the end of the 30-day treatment period. The company is in the process of commercializing the device, which received FDA clearance last year.  Nipple, who said his pain was on average an eight or a nine (on a scale of one to 10), noticed relief soon after after using the device. His pain levels dropped to about a one or a two.  More than two years after the trial, he's more mobile and sleeping better. He's even ridden his 3-wheel Spyder bike from North Carolina to Wisconsin.

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Wearables Need Fresh Design Style

Wearables Need Fresh Design Style | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Current wearable technology falls far short of its potential because of a siloed approach to design, a lack of interdisciplinary R&D and a general inability of product designers to solve real human needs.
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Current wearable technology falls far short of its potential because of a siloed approach to design, a lack of interdisciplinary R&D and a general inability of product designers to solve real human needs.

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