Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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LG's Flexible Smartphone Display To Go Into Mass Production | Geeky Gadgets

LG's Flexible Smartphone Display To Go Into Mass Production | Geeky Gadgets | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Earlier today we heard that Samsung are expected to announce their new flexible display smartphone shortly, LG also has a flexible smartphone in the works.

Via Tiaan Jonker
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More flexible screens - expect to see more of this in the wearable domain

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robyns tut's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:19 AM

Interesting concept. Could be useful to people like me who are constantly breaking expensive electronic devices. 

Nandi

robyns tut's curator insight, October 14, 2013 5:28 PM

This is so interesting. Where we once had bulky brick cellphones, now they are as thin as paper. - Sara

poojarajput's curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:09 AM

http://www.jagran.com/lifestyle/technology-news-hindi.html

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Biometrics – Understanding Privacy vs Anonymity

Biometrics – Understanding Privacy vs Anonymity | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Biometrics, or the measurement of physiological or behavioral characteristics for authentication or identification, has potential for enormous positive impact on such areas as law enforcement, data protection, counter-terrorism and border security.
Yet concerns about privacy have given some people pause. When considering biometrics, it’s important to understand the difference between anonymity and privacy – and why it matters.
“People sometimes confuse privacy and anonymity,” says John Mears, Senior Fellow, Homeland Security Solutions at Leidos. ‘Many don’t understand the difference, and the relationship of the two things to the concept of trust.” For Mears, being recognized in an encounter at a store or while walking down the street can be embarrassing in certain situations, especially if you can’t remember the other person’s name, but that’s the extent of it. “There’s no harm in somebody recognizing me,” he says. “My privacy hasn’t been invaded because I’m walking down the street or going to the store.” 

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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“In the U.S., we have no less than 29 federal laws covering protections of various aspects and definitions of privacy,” says Mears. “There is no guarantee of anonymity in any of our laws.” In the case of biometrics, the loss of anonymity itself isn’t harmful; it’s what happens when someone is identified that counts. For identified bad people, we want protection for the rest of society.   For innocent people, we want protection from fraud and unnecessary invasions of privacy. Strong identity helps sort them out in either case. “Strong identity concepts, pervasively implemented, are keys to a high-functioning society.”

Whether you are a government or a company, how do you maintain the public’s trust when implementing strong identity practices that include biometrics? At the highest level, the answer to this question revolves around communications, being transparent about identity policies, and periodically verifying adherance to those policies.   In the case of the government, agencies involved in identity verification practices publish privacy impact assessments, which are publicly available. Companies aren’t subject to such regulations, so the International Biometrics and Identity Association, as well as the Biometrics Institute and the Security Industry Association have published recommended best practices for trustworthy companies. Generally they state that organizations should provide notice of when and where biometrics are being used and for what purpose, and be transparent with their customers or users in defining what is collected and for how long it can be stored, and on whether information can be shared and with whom. With the right transparent policies in place, rigorous biometrically-verified identity can be both beneficial to society, as well as preserving of privacy and trust.

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A Sensor on Your Skin That Looks and Feels Like a Temporary Tattoo

A Sensor on Your Skin That Looks and Feels Like a Temporary Tattoo | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a new breathable, wearable sensor that can monitor vital signals without irritating skin.
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Researchers say the new nanomesh device can theoretically be worn for a week or longer without such problems. The drawback is that it can be rubbed off with water, so in reality, it will need to be replaced after every shower or bath.  There is a trade-off between how comfortable the device is and its durability, Dr. Someya said, adding that this is an area of future research.  

The device is made from nanoscale meshes containing a water-soluble polymer called polyvinyl alcohol and a layer of gold. It can be applied similarly to children’s temporary tattoos. Just spritz water on it, dissolving nanofibers in the patch, and stick it to the skin. The device conforms to the varied textures of human skin, including sweat pores and fingerprint ridges, while still letting air in through tiny gaps.

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Scientists Have Found a Way to Weave Wearable Sensors Into Fabric

Scientists Have Found a Way to Weave Wearable Sensors Into Fabric | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable tech can be as simple as an activity tracker that collects information like step count and heart rate. But the potentia
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One team of engineers is taking wearable technology and making it much more...well...wearable. At Harvard, Asli Atalay, a textile engineer, and her team have created a "fabric" that seems, at first glance, like gray, extra-stretchy t-shirt material. A blend of nylon and spandex, this stretchy material has a shiny, metallic underside. This sheen comes from an actual silver coating on the fibers. This coating doesn't impede the flexibility of the fabric at all, but it does allow it to conduct electricity.

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Patient Monitoring Device Market Opportunities, In-Depth Analysis, Challenges and Applications Forecast to 2022 | Green Mountain Outlook

Patient Monitoring Device Market Opportunities, In-Depth Analysis, Challenges and Applications Forecast to 2022 | Green Mountain Outlook | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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  • Gain a global perspective on the development of the market.
  • Report will be updated with the latest data and delivered to you within 3-5 working days of order.
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At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Plunging Ahead into Wearable Technology and Care Redesign | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology

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"As you may be aware, there have been several negative randomized control trials on post-discharge wearable monitoring, in heart failure as well as COPD patients. So, while I think a lot of these things could make intuitive sense and I’m interested in different projects, I’m also a big skeptic, because the literature would suggest that it doesn’t work, right now, the way that we’re doing it. Home hospital is very different than a simple program where a patient is being discharged from the hospital and we’re going to slap a wearable on them and try to figure out if their getting worse and intervene before they come back, because that, so far, has not been shown to work. It’s not necessarily a question of the technology. It’s a question of whether or not monitoring somebody after they have left the hospital actually prevents them from coming back to the hospital. That is the key question, and, so far, the answer is, probably not."

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Parkinson's Patients Get Balance Help with Wearable Biofeedback System

Parkinson's Patients Get Balance Help with Wearable Biofeedback System | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Houston researchers developed the Smarter Balance System using smartphone-based biofeedback to help patients with Parkinson’s regain balance.
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According to the SMART research group, about 60% of people with Parkinson’s disease fall annually, and two-thirds of those people fall more than once or twice a year. While medication or deep brain stimulation could help with many of Parkinson’s symptoms, postural instability and muscle weakness are usually responsible for causing falls. While treatments for this often are ineffective, physical rehabilitation could help.

The goal of Lee’s team in developing SBS is to bring physical rehabilitation into patients’ homes where clinics are not widely available. The technology does not aim to replace the need for patients to see rehabilitation physicians, but rather to serve as an alternative, even at a distance.  Because the system is connected to the internet, a patient could use SBS with the guidance of a doctor or physical therapist. The system uploads all collected information to an online server, where it can be accessed to track a patient’s progress or to adjust the exercise regimen.   “It’s important to develop a system that is easy to use and readily available in the home environment,” Lee said. “Most of the time, patients have to rehab at a clinic but there might be limited access. We’re not trying to replace traditional therapy but there is a shortage of physical therapists.”

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Google Glass is back from the dead

Google Glass is back from the dead | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google Glass, the smart head-up display and camera that was supposed to become everyone’s next portable computer, isn’t dead. It’s gotten a job — multiple jobs, in fact. The second iteratio
Richard Platt's insight:

(Google parent company) Alphabet today lifts the non-disclosure requirement on its Glass EE partners and is opening up the program for more businesses to participate. The failure of Google’s information-augmenting glasses as a mass market product, it seems, might spawn the success of Alphabet’s workplace-focused assistive device.  -   Alphabet’s product managers sound bullish about the prospects of Glass in the workplace. Project lead Jay Kothari is quoted as saying, “This isn’t an experiment. It was an experiment three years ago. Now we are in full-on production with our customers and with our partners.” Indeed, according to the latest report, the feedback from workers and companies has been overwhelmingly positive, with Glass providing assistive information on the work floor and improving productivity.

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'Wearable tech' set to improve the health of Hertfordshire's most vulnerable residents

'Wearable tech' set to improve the health of Hertfordshire's most vulnerable residents | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Cutting-edge 'wearable tech' is set to improve the health of Hertfordshire's most vulnerable

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The clothing, which incorporates the use of activity trackers and sensors, will help people to stay safe and independent in their own homes.  The authority says it will also offer greater peace of mind for carers and family members - and ease pressures on social care services. Information that's collected will be used by care teams to improve support and will also be available to family members and carers.

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Red Wings use of wearable technology hints at what...

Red Wings use of wearable technology hints at what... | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
TRAVERSE CITY, MI - The routine for NHL players is usually the same after games.

They get back to the dressing room. They start to strip away gea
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All camp long, the players have had a heart rate monitor strapped to their chest that take real-time measurements tracking the intensity of each player’s training session.   It’s fascinating to watch play out live as the players are on...

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Wearable Computing and Human Computer Interfaces

These slides discuss how improvements in ICs, MEMS, cameras, and other electronic components are making wearable computing and new forms of human-computer int…
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Richard Platt's curator insight, July 2, 1:11 PM

Wearable Computing and Human Computer Interfaces http://sco.lt/...Preso on how improvements in ICs, MEMS, cameras, and other electronic components are making

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Hi-tech bike helmet has two cameras and gives 320 degree vision 

Hi-tech bike helmet has two cameras and gives 320 degree vision  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
According to the Cairns-based firm behind the helmet, the CycleVision weighs just 280 grams, has two 1080p cameras capturing a 160-degree field of view each.
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Designed by Australian firm Cyclevision, the lightweight helmet has two HD cameras embedded into the frame and can even stream the footage from the rear camera to a phone on the handlebars.  Footage captured by the cameras is recorded on 4.5-hour 'continuous overwriting loop' which is stored on a 32GB SD card. The helmet has two 1080p micro HD cameras - one in the front and one in the back.  Cameras capture a 160-degree field of view each, recording everything going on in front and behind of the rider.  Footage is recorded on a 4.5 hour 'continuous overwriting loop' which is stored on a 32GB SD card. But a 256GB upgrade is available. A rechargeable lithium polymer battery provides 5 hours of recording time.  By connecting the camera to a phone mounted on the handlebars, the rider can keep track of hazards behind them.  But the firm offers an upgrade to 256GB for better vision data storage.  According to the Cairns-based firm, the CycleVision helmet weighs just 280 grams and all the components are waterproof.  To get the footage from the cameras, wearers plug into a USB port and vision and audio files can be easily transferred to a laptop.  It is powered by a rechargeable lithium polymer battery that can provide five hours of recording time. 

But the most notable feature is the Wi-Fi connection of the rear camera. By connecting the camera to a phone mounted on the rider's handlebars, the rider can keep track of how close that truck is to their mud guard.

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TotalMad's curator insight, March 30, 2016 6:29 PM
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Detect a child’s temperature “without disturbing them"

Detect a child’s temperature “without disturbing them" | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Pacif-i is hitting the market at a time when smart baby products are becoming more and more popular.
Richard Platt's insight:

Pacif-i, like so many other products these days, comes with its own application, which can be accessed on an Android or iOS device. The pacifier, created by Blue Maestro, can detect a child’s temperature, “without disturbing them,” surely a big selling point for parents who are loathe to wake their child to check for fever. The smartphone simply needs to be within 30 feet of the pacifier, meaning parents can check their child’s temperature from the next room. “If a baby is too hot, they have trouble regulating their temperature and they can’t get to sleep,” said Blue Maestro CEO Richard Hancock. “This application provides parents with a very easy way to monitor their child’s temperature and take action.”

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Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, March 30, 2016 3:04 AM

Pacif-i, like so many other products these days, comes with its own application, which can be accessed on an Android or iOS device. The pacifier, created by Blue Maestro, can detect a child’s temperature, “without disturbing them,” surely a big selling point for parents who are loathe to wake their child to check for fever. The smartphone simply needs to be within 30 feet of the pacifier, meaning parents can check their child’s temperature from the next room. “If a baby is too hot, they have trouble regulating their temperature and they can’t get to sleep,” said Blue Maestro CEO Richard Hancock. “This application provides parents with a very easy way to monitor their child’s temperature and take action.”

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Michael Kors New Smartwatches Making A Statement

Michael Kors New Smartwatches Making A Statement | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Michael Kors has shown the world what he has planned in the wearables market with two watches that will ship in the Fall of 2016.
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Only two watches will make it to department stores and Michael Kors stores when they ship in the fall of 2016 ahead of the holiday shopping season. The wrists of women will have the opportunity to be adorned by a gold-plated wearable, while men will be treated to a sporty black number with both retailing for $395.   “We began by exploring a large number of designs, which we eventually narrowed down to a few body options,” Kors, chairman and chief creative officer, said. “There were many rounds of prototypes to get to the final product line.  “We looked closely at a range of colors and materials, so there were a lot of samples with various plating and material combinations before we arrived at the best options for both the watch and the straps. We also spent a lot of time exploring designs for the digital watch faces, because they’re an important part of what we are offering our customer.”   As each runs Android Wear, users will simply need either an Apple iPhone or one of the many Android options in order to get the true “smart” aspects from these timepieces. Those include but are not limited to: fitness/health tracking, text messages, email, and app notifications.  Both allow for customization  -  “It was important to us that the display watch was customizable, so users can incorporate their own personal style into their smartwatch,” Kors chairman and CEO John Idol told Mashable. “For example, through the day, customers will be able to change out straps or the watch face to reflect their mood or personal style.”   “Not only do we think the wearable technology business is going to grow in the future, we also saw the huge opportunity in the current space for products that look luxurious and focus on the design as well as functionality,” 

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Mayo Clinic Using mHealth to Target Sudden Death Events in Kids

Mayo Clinic Using mHealth to Target Sudden Death Events in Kids | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Mayo Clinic testing mHealth technology designed to detect and prevent sudden death in children, young adults
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Traditionally, people with suspected heart conditions are required to visit a hospital or clinic for an expensive and invasive 12-lead ECG. But long QT syndrome, which can be genetic or develop through medication interactions, is often hard to detect.

“Up to this point, it has been pretty difficult to catch,” says Vic Gundotra, AliveCor’s CEO. “In most cases, this stuff goes undiagnosed in children and young adults until something very bad happens.” With mHealth technology, Gundotra says, the tools exists to put devices in the hands of people outside the hospital, allowing for remote monitoring at any time and place.

“This new technology could one day allow pharmacists, coaches and others to actively screen for and prevent sudden cardiac deaths,” he said.  The partnership is the third between the Mayo Clinic and AliveCor, whose AI technology is now used in wearable devices – including the Apple Watch - to detect atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia that leads to a five times greater risk of stroke, and hyperkalemia, abnormal blood potassium levels that can cause cardiac arrest and death.

Gundotra said the mHealth platform deploys AI tools to “see the invisible signs” and help healthcare providers identify potentially dangerous conditions they wouldn’t otherwise see. By identifying those signs early, he said, doctors can intervene and design care management plans that improve long-term clinical outcomes, reduce costly emergency treatment and even prevent deaths.  That’s an extreme but not entirely-unlikely outcome in some long QT cases. In some well-publicized incidents, the condition has been found to cause the deaths in children and young adults who collapse while playing sports.

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Atari launches wearable push with Speakerhats

Atari launches wearable push with Speakerhats | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Ball caps with built-in Bluetooth speakers made in partnership with NECA and Audiowear
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Atari today announced its first endeavor into wearable technology, the Atari Speakerhat. Produced in partnership with social audio company Audiowear, the Speakerhats look like standard baseball caps with Atari branding on them, but have two speakers built into the underside of the brim that can connect to any Bluetooth-enabled device. The hats also have a "multiplayer mode" allowing a number of hats to play the same audio stream in synch. The hats are debuting at the San Diego Comic-Con this week, and a Blade Runner 2049-branded version of the Speakerhat is set to launch this fall with the participation of NECA.  No pricing was announced for the hats, and Atari has said it is currently looking for beta testers. The company's website frames the beta test as a contest, suggesting that a package including a Speakerhat, an Atari T-shirt, an Atari Flashback compilation for PS4 or Xbox One and participation in the beta test program has an approximate value of $300.

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Intel Gives Up on Wearables

Intel Gives Up on Wearables | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Intel has reportedly shut down its wearable operations to direct resources to augmented reality.
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Interestingly, CNBC claims that most of the work to close Basis began in November. At the end of last year, Intel reportedly axed 80 percent of the division, giving staff who worked there the opportunity to relocate to other parts of the business.

Tech Crunch appeared to be privy to this information, reporting at the time that the company was in the midst of laying off staff. Intel hit back, claiming that it was actually about to release several new wearable products.  Even though Intel continued to insist that wearable technology remained part of its future plans, fresh reports that its ill-fated experiment to lead the sector have come to an end shouldn’t perhaps come as much of a surprise. New product launches have slowed ever since the company was forced to recall the Basis Peak smartwatch in 2016 due to overheating concerns. Plus, as CNBC points out, the chipmaker’s executives haven’t mentioned wearable technology on an earnings call since 2014.  Market indicators suggests that demand for wearable health devices remains healthy. However, the sector has also come under fire from some sources. In May, research from Stanford University claimed that the majority of fitness trackers are incapable of reliably measuring how many calories are burned during a workout. 

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Sports teams, military tap B.C. tech to fight fatigue

Sports teams, military tap B.C. tech to fight fatigue | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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 2011 WorkSafeBC report cited research that found 17 hours awake is the equivalent to a blood alcohol level of 0.05. That level goes up to 0.1 if someone has been up for 24 to 25 hours.

Jim Hughes, president of Burnaby-based Working Safety Solutions, said he understands concerns about privacy, but most work crews would likely be in favour of such measures.

“It’s like the drug-monitoring thing,” he said. “At the end of the day, the crews really liked it because it kept the guys having problems off.”  Hughes said safety concerns are likely to trump privacy concerns in high-pressure jobs involving heavy machinery.

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Irish Tech Startup Releases Wearable Cryptocurrency Device

Irish Tech Startup Releases Wearable Cryptocurrency Device | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Irish Tech Startup Releases Wearable Cryptocurrency Device
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The tech, called Festy, is the brainchild of Irish tech firm Bitcart and will be the first of its kind on the market. It utilizes a QR code with a Blockchain infrastructure that takes advantage of Dash’s InstantSend technology, making payments nearly immediate, but with much lower fees than legacy credit cards. CEO Graham de Barra said, “...Unlike existing traditional bank payments that take a two to five percent fee, there is no cost on receiving Dash for merchants.”   -  The concept is new in the cryptocurrency world, as companies seek to find ways to capitalize on the sudden surge of public interest in decentralized currencies and Blockchain technology. The clear advantages of Blockchain in terms of security and payment verification have prompted the rise in interest as well.

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Apple’s Health and Fitness Push Accelerates as it Turns 3

Apple’s Health and Fitness Push Accelerates as it Turns 3 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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Apple is never going to be done in this area, and neither are its partners or its competitors. There’s lots of work still to be done by all these players in a field that I suspect is going to receive increasing attention from the tech industry over the coming years, even as politicians argue over the best ways to manage the funding of healthcare and the structure of insurance plans that will pay for much of this. I’m hopeful that we’ll see much faster change and greater benefits coming on the technology side, and this week I saw promising signs in that direction.

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Secrets That an iPhone App Developer Will Never Disclose About Wearable

Secrets That an iPhone App Developer Will Never Disclose About Wearable | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technology is the new frontier for companies seeking to remain on the cutting edge of consumer technology. After witnessing the transformation from laptop to tablets and smartphones the next…
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  • Cautious about User Interface: For any device, UI UX designs are very important. The challenge with the wearable device is that it has a smaller screen size; hence iPhone app developers have to be very cautious about designing the wearable application. The best approach can be to emphasize the methods like passive data collection and speech focused commands.
  • Cross Platform Support: To capture different users, make sure to develop a wearable application which can support all the platforms.
  • Quick App Development and Launch: New devices are getting launched every day so if you want to achieve success, you have to be fast in your wearable app development and launch.

 

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, July 15, 8:51 AM

#Wearables are the next big thing!

David Stapleton's curator insight, July 16, 4:32 PM
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Disruptive Technology and the Plastic in Your Wallet

Disruptive Technology and the Plastic in Your Wallet | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Disruptive Technology and the Plastic in Your Wallet Look around you. It’s no longer an esoteric or ethereal concept – it’s real. The Internet of things is
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Wearable tech has a way to go yet before it gains mainstream appeal. These strongest growth markets are still iOS and Android apps, while wristbands, smart watches, and headgear are slow on the uptake. Credit card companies are not waiting for the disruptive effects to cause an avalanche in the industry – they are leading from the front with innovative digital payment models that are changing the e-commerce landscape forever.

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Jawbone is going out of business

Jawbone is going out of business | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The news comes after more than a year of financial turmoil at the company, which led to deteriorating customer service, dwindling inventory, and key executive departures — all as the company entered into a legal battle with rival Fitbit.
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The news comes after more than a year of financial turmoil at the company, which led to deteriorating customer service, dwindling inventory, and key executive departures — all as the company entered into a legal battle with rival Fitbit.

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Sensor Tech isn’t yet ready to Power the ‘Wearable Internet’

Sensor Tech isn’t yet ready to Power the ‘Wearable Internet’ | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Powered by your body heat, solar panels or an electromagnetic charger, sensors would capture information both about you and everything around you. From knowing your heart rate, location, direction you’re proceeding, outside temperature and activities also your weight, sensors would know all about you.
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With the pricing of sensors has dropped 200 times over the last two decades,some sensors are one-tenth the price they were just four years ago, despite having vastly improved their function. This is why it's easy for people to think sensors will get cheaper. But a lot of sensors are still expensive, and many of them don't perform as well as they should.  There are hundreds of different sensors whose prices needs to drop to 10 cents for the wearable Internet to reach its full potential. Accelerometers used to be the size of a human thumb and costed about $25. Now a millimeter square cost 10 cents and also perform better than the thumb-sized version. The 10-cent compass in your smartphone is navigation-grade, meaning it is about as good as the compass in an airplane cockpit.Medical sensors are also in their infancy.  Sensors are unlike other smartphone components where you cannot outsource manufacturing to other nations just to have them cheaper but they solely rely on technological innovation. Since more sensors are analog, they need to convert their readings to digital so that it can be shared. Since these are innovated by highly paid engineering, master engineers with a PhD, they cannot come cheap.  The sensor section is also highly diversified since each entity relies on different technology. Ranging from chemical to physical and medical, each of these have their own sensors, it takes a lot of research and innovation to have them work upon. These are some problems that need to be solved before reaching the required potential for wearable internet and while there are problems like these it might take a while. But the change is real, it has already started with smartwatches and wearable technology is only about less than a decade away.

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Not The Internet Of Things Generation: Only 9% Of Teens Likely To Own A Wearable

Not The Internet Of Things Generation: Only 9% Of Teens Likely To Own A Wearable | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Not The Internet Of Things Generation: Only 9% Of Teens Likely To Own A Wearable - 03/29/2016
Richard Platt's insight:

Discussions about IoT adoption often take into consideration the expectations of what the next generation will do.  This is a challenging concept, since the next generation won’t be looking at buying the current generation of IoT products.  But there are starting to be some early indicators of some of the thinking of the next generation, at least about the current state of smart or connected objects.  For example, only 9% of teens are likely to own a wearable, according to a study of how teens and millennials use email, conducted by Adestra, a marketing a technology company.  More (19%) millennials, in this case those 19-34 years old, are more likely to own wearables.  As yet another indicator of not yet jumping aboard the IoT train, the majority (54%) of elementary school age children and 59% of those in middle school have no great interest in autonomous cars, as I wrote about here recently 

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Philippe Marchal's curator insight, March 29, 2016 5:39 PM

Discussions about IoT adoption often take into consideration the expectations of what the next generation will do.  This is a challenging concept, since the next generation won’t be looking at buying the current generation of IoT products.  But there are starting to be some early indicators of some of the thinking of the next generation, at least about the current state of smart or connected objects.  For example, only 9% of teens are likely to own a wearable, according to a study of how teens and millennials use email, conducted by Adestra, a marketing a technology company.  More (19%) millennials, in this case those 19-34 years old, are more likely to own wearables.  As yet another indicator of not yet jumping aboard the IoT train, the majority (54%) of elementary school age children and 59% of those in middle school have no great interest in autonomous cars, as I wrote about here recently 

Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, March 30, 2016 3:03 AM

Discussions about IoT adoption often take into consideration the expectations of what the next generation will do.  This is a challenging concept, since the next generation won’t be looking at buying the current generation of IoT products.  But there are starting to be some early indicators of some of the thinking of the next generation, at least about the current state of smart or connected objects.  For example, only 9% of teens are likely to own a wearable, according to a study of how teens and millennials use email, conducted by Adestra, a marketing a technology company.  More (19%) millennials, in this case those 19-34 years old, are more likely to own wearables.  As yet another indicator of not yet jumping aboard the IoT train, the majority (54%) of elementary school age children and 59% of those in middle school have no great interest in autonomous cars, as I wrote about here recently 

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Wearable tech takes aim at health care costs | ET HealthWorld

Wearable tech takes aim at health care costs | ET HealthWorld | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Stroll around the office or neighborhood six times a day, and earn $1.50 toward your health insurance.Step up activity a bit more and bring the total ..
Richard Platt's insight:

'Gamification'  As a further incentive, Target said it would allow teams of employees which log the most average daily steps to collect more than $1 million for local non-profit organizations.

This strategy of providing financial incentives for healthy activity is known in the industry as "gamification."  "We have a lot of clients who want to subsidize the program and make it free, but it's less effective," Fleming said. "There has to be both a carrot and a stick."  One program being offered through health services firm Vitality Group provides an Apple Watch for $25, a fraction of the retail cost. But employees must "pay" for the device by completing workouts and gym visits each month.

Growth in such programs over the past few years coincides with incentives to meet Obamacare goals on preventive care, and with new research suggesting that more activity can ward off many medical ailments.

Data mining  But the new programs raise questions about private data collected and stored by insurers.  While employers and insurers must comply with US privacy regulations so that health data cannot be seen or used by employers, critics still worry.  "Technology is outpacing the legal protections in place,"

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