Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Dissolvable Patches can replace need for needles

Dissolvable Patches can replace need for needles | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A study into flu treatment suggests we could do away with needles, using a dissolvable patch to administer vaccines instead | no needles

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

A study into flu treatment suggests we could do away with needles, using a dissolvable patch to administer vaccines instead.  There are plenty of people out there with a fear of needles, reportedly one in five people suffer from what’s called trypanophobia.  To be honest, even the rest of us who aren’t afraid of them would still rather a situation that didn’t involve a needle being shoved into our arms.  Research by Osaka University academics in Japan that points to a future of no needles, for some cases, should be welcomed by many.

No needles: A novel approach

But Nakagawa used water to make the patch, and hyaluronic acid to create the needles – hyaluronic acid is something that humans naturally produce to cushion their joints.

When the patch is applied like a plaster, the needles pierce the top layer of skin without causing pain and dissolve into the body, taking the vaccine with them.   “Because the new patch is so easy to use, we believe it will be particularly effective in supporting vaccination in developing countries,” said Professor Nakagawa, professor of biotechnology and therapeutics at Osaka University. By testing the patches with flu vaccines, the results seemed positive, with results showing that patients had at least as much a reaction as those treated traditionally — the paper doesn’t detail who, of those treated, subsequently got the flu.


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Identity, Control, Safety: The next generation of Wearable Tech

Identity, Control, Safety: The next generation of Wearable Tech | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Identity, control, safety – these are the three areas where wearable technology will evolve in its next generation, according to Sonny VU, CEO of wearables company Misfit. “Right now, in a current world of wearables, we’re still very much in a 1.0 world”, he says.”If you think about it, the use cases for wearables right …

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Identity, control, safety – these are the three areas where wearable technology will evolve in its next generation, according to Sonny VU, CEO of wearables company Misfit. “Right now, in a current world of wearables, we’re still very much in a 1.0 world”, he says.”If you think about it, the use cases for wearables right …

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Moolahonly's curator insight, May 8, 2015 1:27 PM

These are the types of wearable devices we would like help get funding on our crowdfunding platform www.moolahonly.com

 

Please support our Headtalker campaign at http://bit.ly/1EjTMyU

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Fever alarm armband: A wearable, printable, temperature sensor

Fever alarm armband: A wearable, printable, temperature sensor | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
University of Tokyo researchers have developed a "fever alarm armband," a flexible, self-powered wearable device that sounds an alarm in case of high body temperature. This armband will be presented at the 2015 IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference, San Francisco, on 22-26 February, 2015. The flexible organic components developed for this device are well-suited to wearable devices that continuously monitor vital signs including temperature and heart rate for applications in healthcare settings.

The new device developed by research groups lead by Professor Takayasu Sakurai at the Institute of Industrial Science and Professor Takao Someya at the Graduate School of Engineering combines a flexible amorphous silicon solar panel, piezoelectric speaker, temperature sensor, and power supply circuit created with organic components in a single flexible, wearable package.

Constant monitoring of health indicators such as heart rate and body temperature is the focus of intense interest in the fields of infant, elderly and patient care. Sensors for such applications need to be flexible and wireless for patient comfort, maintenance-free and not requiring external energy supply, and cheap enough to permit disposable use to ensure hygiene. Conventional sensors based on rigid components are unable to meet these requirements, so the researchers have developed a flexible solution that incorporates organic components that can be printed by an inkjet printer on a polymeric film.

The fever alarm armband incorporates several first-ever achievements. It is the first organic circuit able to produce a sound output, and the first to incorporate an organic power supply circuit. The former enables the device to provide audible information when the flexible thermal sensor detects a pre-set value within the ranges of 36.5 ºC to 38.5 ºC, while the latter increases the range of operational illumination by 7.3 times in indoor lighting conditions.

"Our fever alarm armband demonstrates that it is possible to produce flexible, disposable devices that can greatly enhance the amount of information available to carers in healthcare settings," says Professor Someya. "We have demonstrated the technology with a temperature sensor and fever alarm, but the system could also be adapted to provide audible feedback on body temperature, or combined with other sensors to register wetness, pressure or heart rate."

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Swipe: The Tech helping Disabled Athletes

Swipe: The Tech helping Disabled Athletes | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Swipe team hits the slopes and meets inventors at the cutting edge of disabled sports technology.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

This is an area where designers and inventors have to understand the exact needs of the person using their product. 

  • How can a partially sighted skier be more independent?
  • How can you make it easier for a wheelchair rugby player to right themselves after a fall?
  • These are the kinds of questions that students at Imperial College London have been trying to answer as part of the Rio Tinto Sports Innovation Challenge.
  • These prototypes could play an important role in the future of technology for disabled sportsmen and women.
  • Currently, blind or partially sighted skiers rely on guides who ski in front of them. They are linked through Bluetooth headsets.
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BeBop's Smart Fabric puts Sensors in everything you Wear

BeBop's Smart Fabric puts Sensors in everything you Wear | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable sensors don't tend to do much; they're usually limited to health data like EKG readings or your heart rate. If BeBop Sensors has its way, though, they'll be useful for just about anything that comes in contact with your body.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

The company is only providing the basic technology, not finished products, so it'll be a while before you see this smart cloth in something you can buy.  

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Bonnie Sandy's curator insight, October 29, 2014 9:01 PM

Whatever your niche or need BeBop's Smart Fabric makes Sensors  wearable and easy to adopt. At least that's the promise!

Generic Student's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:31 AM

This seems like it would have many ingenious uses.

Giselle Pempedjian's curator insight, October 31, 2014 2:09 AM

At last!!! That's cool!

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Philips aims to relieve persistent pain with Smartphone-controlled Devices

Philips aims to relieve persistent pain with Smartphone-controlled Devices | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Philips will soon launch a couple of iPhone- and iPad-controlled devices, but they're not the company's usual phone docks or Hue smartlight models -- they're gadgets designed to help suppress persistent pain.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Good use case development 

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Google's Race to Lead Wearable Tech Future

Google's Race to Lead Wearable Tech Future | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Siliconrepublic.com Google's Race To Lead Wearable Tech Future Sky News If the bill is passed, the Council will join the NYPD and many other organisations, both public and private, who can see the potential of wearable technology and are trying to...

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

..."in a not-very-well-concealed attempt to steal away  publicity from Samsung's Gear product line , Google just announced that next week it's selling a limited number of its "Glass" devices to the US public. Previously, Glass was only available to a select group of volunteers called "explorers". -  Told you the Silicon Wars were on and the hunt is on to crack the code of wearable tech continues -  Gotta love it 

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5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare

5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technology is an industry that continues to grow and adapt to meet the ever-changing needs of our world.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare 

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Marco Antonio Gonzalez's curator insight, January 9, 2014 3:01 AM

About the eHeatlh from new visions in the nerwork 

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Intel's open-source Galileo computer on sale for $69.90 - Australian Techworld

Intel's open-source Galileo computer on sale for $69.90 - Australian Techworld | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Intel's Galileo open-source computer for the hacker and do-it-yourself crowd can now be ordered for US$69.90, and is scheduled to ship at the end of November.


Via jean lievens, Richard Platt
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We really like Galileo, it has Quark on it, and this is purpose built for the DIY crowd, we think this is very smart move on Intel's part, essentially creating an open innovation platform for all to use.  

 

And according to my sources the pet project of the CEO Brian Krzanich apparently with much resistance internally to go do it initially,.  

 

To us at the S+IG this is an easy to place bet, in fact plain smart, who else has one out there?  No one.  which demonstrates vision where others have not, and commitment to go against the grain to do the right thing and to explore options and ask the larger community to go do it.  We commend Brian Krzanich for doing this, we see this as an excellent example of setting a new standard in the IoT space..  We are reminded of our days in desktop operations when Intel built the majority of the motherboards out there, and everyone bought from Intel, and I mean everyone.  

 

Who else is setting a new standard that people can get behind with technology that goes all the way to the silicon level and can integrate it into a killer platform?

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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:44 AM

We really like Galielo, it has Quark on it, and this is purpose built for the DIY crowd, we think this is very smart move on Intel's part, essentially creating an open innovation platform for all to use.  

 

And according to my sources the pet project of the CEO Brian Krzanich apparently with much resistance internally to go do it initially,.  

 

To us at the S+IG this is an easy to place bet, in fact plain smart, who else has one out there?  No one.  which demonstrates vision where others have not, and committment to go against the grain to do the right thing and to explore options and ask the larger community to go do it.  We commend Brian Krzanich for doing this, we see this as an excellent example of setting a new standard in the IoT space..  We are reminded of our days in desktop operations when Intel built the majority of the motherboards out there, and everyone bought from Intel, and I mean everyone.  

 

Who else is setting a new standard that people can get behind with technology that goes all the way to the silicon level and can integrate it into a killer platform?

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Exploring the viability of NFC, biometrics and wearable technology

Exploring the viability of NFC, biometrics and wearable technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
FTE explores the new paper from Artefact Group’s Rob Girling, which explores the future role of wearable technology and biometrics in the travel sector.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

(from the Curator of the IoT & Wearables):  the Future of  wearables and biometrics in the travel industry, which would also have play in just aboput every other location as well

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Michelle Daniels's curator insight, November 16, 2013 3:01 PM

Would you wear new technology? I think I would if I could afford it!

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Apple Watch and The Future of App Design

Apple Watch and The Future of App Design | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The launch of the Apple Watch represents the latest proof point that we’re only going to have more devices to consider when designing mobile apps. Not only..

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

The fact that Apple Watch is designed to be used alongside an iPhone raises another important consideration – your users will not experience your application in isolation on a single a device. They will likely pick and choose the device to interact with, moving from one to another, to meet their needs at a given point in time.  -  As such, it becomes really important to think about system-based design – that is, spending time up-front on a project, considering all the different touch points that your users will engage with your application, and creating a set of related experiences that are clearly designed as one, but that take advantage of and are contextual to each of the device form factors.

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Beyond Wearables: New Frontiers in Interactive Tech

Beyond Wearables: New Frontiers in Interactive Tech | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
In the final months of 2014, wearable technology sparked significant media and consumer attention – not least thanks to the announcement of the Apple Watch.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Smartwatches shift existing technology to a new location – from the pocket to the wrist. More exciting are second-skin devices such as embeddables, ingestibles and hearables. These will include flexible technologies that blend into our skin; devices that are controlled by eye-motion sensors; and earbuds that measure and respond to our heart rate. All are part of the ongoing journey to create technology that is so deeply interwoven with our lives that it becomes almost invisible. The benefits of this transition will be better usability and genuinely groundbreaking technology that goes beyond incremental developments.

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720,000 Android Wear devices shipped in 2014 – Moto 360 is the clear leader

720,000 Android Wear devices shipped in 2014 – Moto 360 is the clear leader | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
More than 720,000 Android Wear devices shipped in 2014 out of a total global market of 4.6m wearable smart bands or watches, according to Canalys.

Via TechinBiz, Jesús Hernández
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Apple can't call new device iWatch after Irish firm trademarks Name

Apple can't call new device iWatch after Irish firm trademarks Name | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
We have iMacs, iPods, iPhones and iPads. But why didn't Apple call its hotly anticipated new smartwatch the iWatch?

Via TechinBiz
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Salesforce unveils big push into Wearable Technology

Salesforce unveils big push into Wearable Technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearables are tech's trend du jour, and Salesforce is trying them on in a big way.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Salesforce has jumped into recent investments in wearable startups and an initiative to get developers to build applications that connect devices worn on the face, wrist and body with Salesforce’s technology.  Salesforce’s interest in wearables illustrates that in addition to being a dominant provider of business applications, the company is also a major computing platform that other developers use to access customers or actually run their own businesses, Irvine said. Wearables are just one emerging technology that will get attention at Dreamforce, and are part of Salesforce’s larger goal of capitalizing on the so-called Internet of Things, which refers to the increasing number of Internet connected devices that are spewing out unprecedented quantities of data that promise countless insights to come. - To get out front on the wearable trend, Salesforce in June launched Salesforce Wear to entice developers to create more enterprise applications for wearable devices, with support for devices from Samsung Electronics Co., Google and Pebble, among others.

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Techstore's curator insight, October 9, 2014 3:20 PM

Salesforce unveils big push into Wearable Technology.

#wearabletech

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Are Wearables Over?

Are Wearables Over? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A recent, widely circulated study found that one-third of Americans who bought a wearable tech product ditched it within six months. So why are... (Is "wearable tech" a fad?

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:
Worth the read, basically we're starting to arrive at what Gartner would call the trough of disillusionment
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jave's curator insight, May 16, 2014 4:31 AM

brits tend to stick at things a bit longer so hoping this trend doesn't follow in the UK #androidwearables

Techstore's curator insight, May 16, 2014 10:07 AM

Are Wearables Over?

#technology #wearabletech

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The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics

The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Following up on the success of cochlear and retinal prostheses for people who have lost sensory function, neuroscientists see a limitless horizon for related devices that are able to read electrical and chemical signals from the nervous system to stimulate capability and restore quality of life in persons suffering injury and disease.

In the future, according to researchers, the devices – known as neural prosthetics – will help epileptics, persons with treatment-resistant depression and chronic pain, victims of Alzheimer’s disease, wounded war veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, persons with speech disabilities, and individuals who have sustained spinal cord injury and loss of limbs, among other applications in the research pipeline.

But before neural prosthetics can advance, engineers will be called on to make innovative use of materials to design and fabricate devices that allow sustained electronic functioning in the harsh environment of the human body, without causing tissue infection and other serious adverse conditions. Research efforts have focused on enhancing the performance of various types of materials used in neural prosthetics, in addition to developing interface technologies that enable the micro devices to be safely implanted in human tissue for long periods.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Richard Platt's insight:

Very interesting wearable - on the inside of the body, - their big issue is having to solve the contradiction of stiff and flexible, turns out it is what is known as Physical Contradiction based on time.  Numerous inventive principles for solving that problem. 

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aanve's curator insight, March 1, 2014 10:05 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Jordan Melnik's curator insight, March 27, 2015 6:16 AM

This source further discusses the use of brain signals for prosthetics. It also discusses the progression of this technology and its importance.

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New wearable technology offers some a measure of independence

New wearable technology offers some a measure of independence | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
For the disabled, the rise of Google Glass and other such devices may make previously difficult tasks easier.

Via TEAM Mike Lopez Memorial Foundation |Find us on Twitter:@TEAMCUREALS, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

This is what we've been hoping that Wearable tech can do for oh so many people

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Several amazing new Technologies now available in 2013

Several amazing new Technologies now available in 2013 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A great video featuring some amazing new technologies that are
featuring in 2013, like Google Smart-Glasses, 3D Printing,
Leap Motion, 3D Printing, transparent phone, Flexible Technology and Flying

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

(from the Curator of the IoT & Wearables):  A Cool video to watch on all the current tech that's worth checking out

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