Wearable Tech and...
Follow
Find
11.9K views | +22 today
Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

How to Protect Your Baby Monitor From Hackers

How to Protect Your Baby Monitor From Hackers | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Baby monitors offer the convenience of live-streaming videos of children straight to their parents’ smartphones and tablets. But a new report warns that the children's parents might not be the only ones watching.
The report, released Wednesday by tech security firm Rapid7, put nine different...
Richard Platt's insight:

Pay attention folks, these IoT and wearable devices haven't yet been built to be completely secure from others.  Time for a little learning on how to manage your personal / home electronic devices more than you have had to do in the past, that is until firms start designing the security built in along side of interoperability - Just saying.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from UX-UI-Wearable-Tech for Enhanced Human
Scoop.it!

Android Wear smartwatches come to the iPhone

Android Wear smartwatches come to the iPhone | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
In a nondescript conference room at Google’s headquarters a few weeks ago, I paired my iPhone to a smartwatch running Android for the first time. I was there to ask Jeff Chang, the lead product...

Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

In a nondescript conference room at Google’s headquarters a few weeks ago, I paired my iPhone to a smartwatch running Android for the first time. I was there to ask Jeff Chang, the lead product manager for Wear, how he’d managed to get Android watches working with iOS and how much they could do with an iPhone. Then my first notification came in on my newly paired Huawei Watch and my carefully laid plans evaporated.    That’s how it goes with smartwatches. They’re meant to keep you from having to pull your phone out of your pocket. You’re supposed to glance at the notifications and smile inwardly, knowing that you can ignore that ping and focus on who you’re talking to. At their best, they do exactly that. At their worst, they derail a conversation.   They’re also still nascent. Very few people have had to bother grappling with the idea of notifications and computers on their wrists, because not all that many people are buying smartwatches. There’s a real sense that everybody’s waiting to see how things shake out, and I don’t blame them. Smartwatches aren’t really ready for everybody yet, not the way that smartphones are. But the smartphone comparison is apt: nothing drove innovation in that space faster than healthy competition between Apple and Google. If competition is what it takes to get smartwatches ready for the mainstream, even Apple Watch users should be glad about Android Wear coming to the iPhone.

more...
Olivier Janin's curator insight, September 2, 4:56 AM

Pairing and using an Android Wear Smartwatch on an iPhone ?

It is now possible. 

Noticeable change in the usual Apple wallet-garden biztech model but it keeps iPhone on a safe position, independant from Smartwatch market.

Yet, the features are not as performant as for an Apple Watch.

Rescooped by Richard Platt from UX-UI-Wearable-Tech for Enhanced Human
Scoop.it!

Misfit and Speedo launch their Swim tracker

Misfit and Speedo launch their Swim tracker | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearables company Misfit has partnered with Speedo to create a new activity tracker designed with swimmers in mind. The Speedo Shine is functionally and aesthetically similar to the earlier Misfit...

Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

Like the original Shine, the Speedo Shine has one notable advantage over many of its competitors: it doesn't look like technology. The device is slim (just 8.6 millimeters thick) with a battery that can last up to six months and is made of machined aluminum that's waterproof to 50 meters. And instead of a full display, it uses 12 LEDs set around the device's perimeter to let wearers track their progress toward their daily activity goal.  This absence of a fine-tuned counter might be a welcome change for those tired of zealous activity trackers that needle them over every step, but it's not clear if this lack of accuracy might also apply (in a less welcome fashion) to the Speed Shine's performance in the pool. Misfit says that it's run batteries of tests on the device's accuracy while swimming, but isn't making any specific claims because, it says, real world conditions are just too difficult to control for. This means that until there are hands-on reviews, it's difficult to know just how accurate the Speedo Shine is when you're giving it your all in the pool.  The Speedo Shine goes on sale for $79.99 on September 1st in Apple's stores and online at Misfit and Speedo's websites.

more...
Olivier Janin's curator insight, September 1, 12:34 PM

The "Speedo Shine" is launched today in Apple Stores at $79.

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Samsung releases revamped smartwatch in challenge to Apple

Samsung releases revamped smartwatch in challenge to Apple | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Samsung introduced two versions of the new round-faced device to be run on the company’s Tizen operating system, which will limit its reach
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung released its new Gear S2 smartwatch Tuesday, looking to regain traction in the wearable technology market quickly being dominated by the Apple Watch.  Introducing two versions of the new round-faced device to be run on the company’s Tizen operating system, which will limit its reach. Google last year introduced an Android operating system as a software solution for wearable manufacturers.  Apple Inc. sold 3.6 million watches in the second quarter, making it the top provider of smart wearable devices after just one quarter of sales, market research firm IDC said in a report last week.   -  While Samsung didn’t release any apps for the Gear S2 on Tuesday, the new watch will allow for mobile payments, smart car keys and remote control of home devices, the South Korean company said in a statement.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The Predicted Wearables Boom Is All About The Wrist

This chart shows a forecast of worldwide wearable device shipments.
Richard Platt's insight:

A recent forecast by IDC seems to confirm that prediction: IDC’s analysts expect worldwide wearable device shipments to grow from 19.6 million units in 2014 to 45.7 million this year and reach 126.1 million units by 2019.   However, speaking of a wearables boom in general seems like a stretch when considering the numbers in more detail. According to IDC, the market’s growth will be fuelled almost exclusively by smart watches and wrist-worn fitness trackers, which are expected to account for 9 in 10 wearables shipped this year. Meanwhile no other type of wearable device is expected to break through to the mainstream anytime soon, as our chart nicely illustrates.  - Not sure I agree with this prognostication, but it is an interesting suggestion.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Wearables4Business
Scoop.it!

The Internet of bling: the Truth behind Wearables

http://www.hp.com/go/discoverperformance Join us for episode 39 of Discover Performance Weekly as we discuss the hot topic of wearables. The basis of the ...

Via wearables4business
Richard Platt's insight:

HP's take on wearables and their impact upon IT in the enterprise

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Study Reveals Wearable Market Will Further Diversify

Study Reveals Wearable Market Will Further Diversify | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable devices are a becoming a big part of today's society, with more gadgets being released almost every day the wearable market as a whole has thoroug
Richard Platt's insight:

In the released paper, Tractica takes into consideration 10 key trends that the whole wearable market has been having considerable progress. The main key component in the list is how wearable technologies have diversified so much that a single market can no longer describe all the gadgets that might be included in it, as wearables are no longer constituted exclusively of smartwatches and fitness trackers; wearable devices’ developers are exploring beyond those two areas, reaching strong innovation points which lead to new types of devices, a great example of this are the relatively new “hearables“. Another important aspect that has faced a significant growth, is that Google and Apple are not the only companies that have created their own wearable operating system, as new startups have adventured and designed their own operating systems exclusively for their wearable device in order to give the user the best experience possible.  Tractica is quite certain that the current growth of the wearable market will lead to an even greater diversification into different segments, dividing the market into at least 6 wearable categories, including smartwatches, smart clothing, smart glasses, body sensors, and wearable cameras.The wearables market is a collection of micro trends within each device segment, application area, and world region,” noted Aditya Kaul, Research Director at Tractica.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Market Analysis: Under Armour Enters the Wearable Technology Market

Market Analysis: Under Armour Enters the Wearable Technology Market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Wearable technology sector, has been expanding rapidly and still has a strong potential for growth. The boom of wearable technology has primarily deriv
Richard Platt's insight:

Under Armour’s Competitive Advantage:  One company that has slipped under the radar is Under Armour, who has recently entered the wearable technology market by announcing that they will collaborate with HTC to release their own wearable device the ‘Grip Fitness Brand’ later this year. Under Armour has recently made tactical purchases of heath and fitness apps, spending $710 million acquiring platforms such as MyFitnessPal, MapMyFitness and Endomondo. The company now controls the world’s largest digital health and fitness community, at 140 million.  Although companies such as Google and Apple have a large advantage when it comes to data collection and usage, they lack the fitness society that Under Armour’s fitness brands such as MyFitnessPal bring to the table. Consumers are able to discuss health and fitness topics via these platforms, creating a sense of community and group motivation to its users.   Under Armour continues to tactically build on these platforms in various ways, such as launching a premium monthly subscription for MyFitnessPal’s advanced services.    -   Yet it is not just at the consumer level that Under Armour has the innovative upper hand against competitors. The company has recently teamed up with the health tech company Zephyr Technology to create a sensor-equipped compressed shirt that can be used to enhance competitive athletes’ performance and decrease the risk of injury by measuring bodily statistics such as heart health, metabolic rate and VO2 max. This device additionally has the potential to be worn by players during sports events to track their peak acceleration, breathing rate and ECG (cardiovascular health) statistics, providing the ability to open up an entirely new market of exercise analysis and perhaps even ‘athlete statistic’ gambling in later years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Turn on your sensors, development is about to go 'wearable'

Turn on your sensors, development is about to go 'wearable' | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Ebola — there’s an app for that:   Most sensors are fairly simple devices. The wearables challenge seeks applications that can provide low-power, unintrusive, highly durable solutions in low-income settings, and many sensor technologies fit that bill.  But there is also a world of sensors emerging that stretches the limits of the imagination. These devices might look simple, but are the result of decades of cutting-edge research at the outer limit of human ingenuity. And according to those who wield them, these sensors, which are invisible, have the power to reshape the relationship between people and the services we depend on most.   Dr. Anita Goel, chairman and CEO of Nanobiosym, manipulates nanomachines, absurdly small robots that read and write DNA.   She and her team have “turned them on their heads” and exploited these tiny machines as nanosensors, capable of capturing and conveying information at very small time and spatial scales. One result of this research is the “Gene-RADAR,” a handheld device Nanobiosym developed. Gene-RADAR, which looks something like an iPad, can diagnose any disease in real time with the same “gold standard” accuracy as a machine that typically weighs several hundred pounds and at one-tenth of the price, Goel told Devex.   “What it represents is an ability to really push forth the decentralization of health care, by bringing next generation infrastructure, instead of the big heavy infrastructure of the past,”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Meet the dark horse of the wearables market: Xiaomi Mi Band

Meet the dark horse of the wearables market: Xiaomi Mi Band | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Beijing-based Xiaomi is taking on competitors like Apple and Fitbit for control of the wearable market.
Richard Platt's insight:

Beijing-based Xiaomi is taking on competitors like Apple and Fitbit for control of the wearable market.   Compared to the best-selling wearables in the United States, Xiaomi’s Mi Band looks underwhelming: It can’t display notifications, connect to third-party apps, or even tell the time. But, in the end, the product might just end up being what disrupts the wearables market just as it’s heating up.

Xiaomi shipped more wearable devices in the last quarter than everyone except tech giants Fitbit and Apple, according to a new report from IDC. In the second quarter of 2015, Xiaomi shipped 3.1 million units of its Mi Band — over four times as many wearables as the fourth place company, Garmin, and good for 17.1% of the global market. Sure, Xiaomi is best known for its smartphones, but it’s truly a major player in the fitness tracker world.  What makes the Mi Band’s rise so striking is that previously, it was sold only in a few select markets — most importantly, China.   Wearables is a broad category and it’s a valid argument that you can’t compare a Fitbit Force or Apple Watch to a Mi Band. An Apple Watch is a full computer on your wrist. The Mi Band doesn’t even have a screen.  But the Mi Band is radically cheaper than almost any other major wearable. It’s $15 and can do the same step tracking and sleep quantifying as Fitbit and Jawbone, all for a fraction of the price. Its simplicity helps it sport a 30-day battery life, which makes it less likely to end up in a drawer because users forgot to charge it. Its low price also makes it a realistic buy for the emerging middle class in many developing countries.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Android Wear update adds interactive watch faces and Google Translate support for bilingual conversations

Android Wear update adds interactive watch faces and Google Translate support for bilingual conversations | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google today updated Android Wear with support for interactive watch faces and Google Translate. The new version is rolling out to all Android Wear watches over-the-air "in the coming weeks."
Richard Platt's insight:
Google has worked with some early partners on a handful of interactive watch faces. There are 21 available today, of which Google highlighted three to showcase what interactive watch faces can do:Bits: Choose the info you want at a glance — from weather, to unread mail, to upcoming meetings. Want to know this afternoon’s weather forecast? Just tap on weather.UnderArmour: Stay motivated with fitness stats on your wrist. Tap the watch face to see your step count, calories burned, and distance.Together: Two people can stay close throughout the day by turning the entire watch face into a space for sharing. Once you’ve paired your watch face with a partner’s, you’ll be able to share things like photos and emoji, as well as your activities (like if you’re working out, on the phone, or stuck in traffic).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

These Wearables Are Designed To Help People With Alzheimer's

These Wearables Are Designed To Help People With Alzheimer's | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
These wearables are designed to help with memory loss and wandering for people suffering with Alzheimer's.
Richard Platt's insight:

Toshiba announced it is entering the wearable market with a bracelet aimed at helping caretakers of elders suffering from dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. But, while it’s still too early to deem itself successful, Toshiba joins a few other companies using wearable technology to help with confusion and memory loss. Here are three promising wearable designs to help with the aging hardships.

Smart socks that alert caretakers. A 15-year-old New Yorker named Kenneth Shinozuka created a light-weight sensor at the heel of his grandfather’s sock to alert his aunt when he got out of bed. When the user leaves a particular spot, it alerts the smartphone app connected via Bluetooth. Shinozuka’s project was awarded the $50K Scientific American Science in Action Award last August. It is now in beta testing at care homes and there’s strong potential it will do well since users won’t have to wear a smartwatch to bed.

Smartwatch that defines danger zones. Using GPS, the CleverCare smartwatch defines danger and safety zones and alerts the caretaker if they leave or enter them. Its user interface includes simple, bold text and bright colors, making it easier for the user to read and create task reminders. In addition to the caretaker, emergency calls go to CleverCare’s 24-hour call center which can help direct them from wherever they are—a safety net that can offer peace of mind if nothing else.

Helping with memory loss. Singapore scientists are developing an application for the Google Glass to recognize different people the user knows. Researchers from the Institute for Infocomm Research at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star) told The Straits Times they are working on ways for the glasses to detect people (and the correct pills) and then displaying things like the name of the person’s identity or the correct pills. The prototype is currently being tested in user trials in Singapore.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Salesforce banks on wearables with 20 enterprise Apple Watch apps

Salesforce banks on wearables with 20 enterprise Apple Watch apps | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Cloud-based customer relationship management vendor Salesforce is counting on the emerging wearable technology market to blossom and put its productivity applications in
Richard Platt's insight:

Lindsey Irvine, global director of strategic partnerships and business development, who heads up the wearables program at Salesforce, said that 79% of executives from companies using or piloting wearable technology described it as “a priority” for their future business strategy. She compared the burgeoning wearables market to the early days of the smart—smart phones didn’t get smart until there was software to run on them.  “It’s not about the device, it’s about the applications,” Irvine said. To kickstart the wearables application market, Salesforce last week announced a bundle of 20 new applications that run on the Apple Watch. Salesforce was a wearables keynote partner at Apple’s March conference, where Apple’s vice-president of technology, Tim Lynch, offered a sneak peek at Salesforce analytics technology running on a smart watch.

Salesforce’s survey also reveled that 76% of early adopters were claiming an increase in productivity, and 86% plan to invest more in wearable technology.   Much like the smart phone market, the wearable technology market is undergoing a splintering of platforms. Though according to survey results companies expected smart watches to lead the way in enterprise impact, smart lanyards, optical products like Google Glass, fitness bands, smart cameras and more are also entering the marketplace. Irvine again made the smart phone analogy in an interview, comparing to the variety of smart phone platforms and the need to develop for all of them.  That’s a lot of heavy lift for the ecosystem,” she said. It also plays to Salesforce’s hand, she said, claiming the platform is faster and simpler to bring apps to market for its network of four million developers.


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from WEARABLES - INSIDABLES - IOT - CONNECTED DEVICES - QUANTIFIEDSELF
Scoop.it!

245 million wearable devices will be sold in 2019

245 million wearable devices will be sold in 2019 | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
In 2019 as many as 245 million wearable devices will be sold, according to CCS Insight's latest wearable tech report, Wearables Forecast Worldwide, 2015 - 2019. For wearables, this number is huge. In 2015, the biggest sellers like Fitbit and Apple are selling around 4.4 million and 3.6 million devices a quarter respectively. And CCS…

Via Tictrac, Celine Sportisse, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

Whatever your take on wearable tech might be right now, these things are not going to go away.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Internet of Things, Quantified Self, Wearable Technology
Scoop.it!

The History Of Wearable Technology

The History Of Wearable Technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

The History Of Wearable Technology - Past, Present And Future, spanning across 7 centuries. FashionTech, DigitalHealth, Embedded Sensors


Via David Barton
Richard Platt's insight:

What is wearable technology, where does it come from, who invented the wearable technology, what is the future of wearable technology? The words “wearable technology” instantly make most people imagine a fitness tracker, a smartwatch or google glasses.  Wearable technology has been with us for a lot longer than you might realise. Way before Google Glass and the “glasshole” there was the eyeglass, one of the first wearables designed to enhance a person’s experience of the world, allowing for clarity and enhanced perception..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Samsung Gear S2, LG Urbane Luxe and Sony Wena Wrist unveiled as Smartwatch War Heats Up

Samsung Gear S2, LG Urbane Luxe and Sony Wena Wrist unveiled as Smartwatch War Heats Up | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
LG went for full luxury, Sony unveiled a Japanese crowdfunding campaign for its new watch that comes with a smart band, and Samsung unveiled its new circular-faced Gear S2 smartwatch
Richard Platt's insight:

LG, Samsung and Sony all showed off new smartwatches on Monday, taking their own approaches to the nascent category.   LG went for full luxury, Sony unveiled a Japanese crowdfunding campaign for its new watch that comes with a smart band, and Samsung unveiled its new circular-faced Gear S2 smartwatch, announcing that its new $1,200 Urbane Luxe would be available at the end of October. The watch sports a round face, a 23-karat-gold body and an alligator strap, and it is a more premium version of the LG Urbane that the company released earlier this year.   Sony, meanwhile, unveiled a Japanese crowdfunding campaign for its new watch that comes with a smart band. The company has raised more than US$154,551 for a campaign for the watch, which has a normal face but houses its tracking and payment options in the clasp of the timepiece. It’s planned for release only in Japan and will work with iOS devices rather than Sony’s own smartphones.  - It is clear that Sony is better at using an Open Innovation platform like a crowdfunding campaign, than their competitors, as a way to test market assumptions about the demand and value of smartwatch design.  Well done Sony.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Samsung Leads The Smartwatch Market

This chart shows the top 10 smartwatch manufacturers by unit sales in 2014.
Richard Platt's insight:

Who are the main players in the smartwatch market? Like the smartphone market, Samsung is going to be Apple's main competitor. The South Korean technology behemoth sold approximately 1.2 million units in 2014, ahead of second placed Pebble with 700,000. The top three was rounded off by Fitbit who sold 600,000 smartwatches.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Internet of Things & Wearable Technology Insights
Scoop.it!

Fitbit Fends Off Apple to Retain Wearables Market Lead

Fitbit Fends Off Apple to Retain Wearables Market Lead | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Despite the arrival of strong competitors such as Apple and Xiaomi, Fitbit has retained the lead in the global wearables market in the second quarter of 2015. The maker of fitness tracking devices shipped 4.4 million units between April and June, an increase of more than 150 percent over last year's June quarter. Fitbit's focus on fitness tracking functionality appears to resonate well with customers who value simplicity over the added functionality of competing devices....


Via Jeff Domansky
Richard Platt's insight:

Overall, the wearables market more than tripled in size compared to last year's second quarter. Between April and June, 18.1 million wearable devices were shipped around the world according to IDC's estimates.  Despite the arrival of strong competitors such as Apple and Xiaomi, Fitbit has retained the lead in the global wearables market in Q2 of 2015. The maker of fitness tracking devices shipped 4.4 million units between April and June, an increase of more than 150% over last year's June quarter. Fitbit's focus on fitness tracking functionality appears to resonate well with customers who value simplicity over the added functionality of competing devices.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 31, 1:09 PM

Surprising strength of Fitbit vs Apple.

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

This Wearable Tech Could Keep Teens Out of Jail

This Wearable Tech Could Keep Teens Out of Jail | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is attempting to change that with the help of Kentucky-based Corrisoft’s AIR wearable tech.
Richard Platt's insight:

Teenage offenders in New York City whose families cannot afford to pay bail likely go to prison to await a trial. But the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is attempting to change that with the help of Kentucky-based Corrisoft’s AIR (Alternative to Incarceration via Rehabilitation) technology.   AIR consists of an ankle bracelet with a Bluetooth chip that tethers it to a smartphone. Traditional GPS bracelets operate on a 2G or 3G network, but using the GPS on a smartphone allows the information to be translated over a 4G network, improving the speed, accuracy and volume of information.

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office will test that approach with a pilot program set to launch in September. Offenders between the ages of 16 and 18 that committed certain felonies will be eligible for the program. The ultimate goal is to keep teenagers that have committed a crime from being subjected to the violence of Riker’s Island, according to the New York Times.  The smartphone technology does more than just track the offender; it also allows for real-time communication with the user.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Microchip, Intel work together on security for IoT devices

Microchip, Intel work together on security for IoT devices | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Using Intel technology, Microchip will now be able to offer enhanced security and privacy for Internet of Things networks and devices.
Richard Platt's insight:

Microchip Technology Inc. and Intel Corp. are collaborating to enhance privacy and security in “Internet of Things” products.
Microchip, the Chandler, AZ -based semiconductor maker, is licensing Intel’s Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID) software for its products, said Bill Swanson, Microchip’s senior product marketing manager for the company’s Computing Products Group.  “This solves two issues: one being security or authenticating, and the second is being able to have privacy in the data," he said.  Intel EPID is a "sophisticated, proven approach" to device authentication that provides both security and privacy for the on-ramp to the Internet of Things, Swanson said.
A demonstration of the Intel EPID Protocol running on Microchip’s Internet of Things security platform was exhibited at the recent Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco.  Microchip has a large presence in connected devices, and with the Intel software it will now be able to add authentication and anonymity to its customers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

​Wearable tech heart rate tracking is 'incredibly accurate'

​Wearable tech heart rate tracking is 'incredibly accurate' | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wrist-based heart rate monitors get a bad rap, especially when it comes to the new wave of devices from the likes of Fitbit, Mio and Apple. But Professor Greg Whyte has told Wareable that, in reality, the criticism levelled at wearable and heart rate tracking accuracy is unfair. And while it should be noted that…
Richard Platt's insight:

Wrist-based heart rate monitors get a bad rap, especially when it comes to the new wave of devices from the likes of Fitbit, Mio and Apple.  But Professor Greg Whyte has told Wareable that, in reality, the criticism levelled at wearable and heart rate tracking accuracy is unfair. And while it should be noted that he's an ambassador for Fitbit, Whyte is a highly respected sports performance scientist, a former Olympic athlete and leads the Centre for Human Health & Performance at Harley Street in London – so he has little to gain by spouting any propaganda in his field.   "It's very easy to knock wearable tech by saying it's not accurate," he told us in an interview at his lab. "There is a lot of noise on them, but actually there is a lot of noise created by humans – particularly during exercise,"  Whyte has seen first hand the differences between the data from top scientific tech and consumer grade wearables. And somewhat surprisingly, he gives the likes of the Fitbit Surge and Apple Watch a glowing bill of health.   "For what they are and what they do, wearable tech is incredibly accurate. The signal to noise is such that the data we're getting is quite good."  -  But what do you do if you notice that over the last week your heart rate has gone up? Well, by taking it in the morning Whyte says you can rule out food or drink, and it's time to start watching other parts of your life.   "Changes in waking heart rate is unlikely to be anything to do with diet or caffeine. It's a global assessment of your physical state. If your heart rate is up by a significant amount, what could the cause be?"  "If you've been drinking heavily the night before then you know why. If you have had a very poor night's sleep because a of a host of reasons like noise etc, than that could be a cause – and then it might be an issue with your 'sleep hygiene' so your blackouts aren't good, you haven't got the right bed, the right linen. It could be that you're in the middle of exams, buying a house, something stressful in life.   "Use it as a starting point, identify what it could be and then address the issues."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Apple Watch Grabs Nearly 20% of Wearables Market

Apple Watch Grabs Nearly 20% of Wearables Market | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Total shipment volume for the quarter came to 18.1 million units, up 223.2 percent from the 5.6 million units shipped in the second quarter of 2014.
Richard Platt's insight:

Apple finds itself within striking distance of the established market leader, Fitbit, in its first appearance in the wearables market, according to a report from IT research firm IDC.  Apple shipped a total of 3.6 million units of its smartwatch, called Apple Watch, in the second quarter of 2015, just 0.8 million units behind Fitbit's 4.4 million units.   Total shipment volume for the quarter came to 18.1 million units, up 223.2 percent from the 5.6 million units shipped in the second quarter of 2014.  "On a scale from 1 to 10, Apple’s participation is an 11. Without a doubt, Apple brings so much to the wearables industry for reasons mentioned in the report," Ramon Llamas, research manager for wearables and mobile phones at IDC, told eWEEK. "In a way, Apple is one of the silver bullets for the success of the overall market. Now that Apple is in the wearables market, as an analyst, I want to see it thrive by developing the product and the service. That will entice more customers, raise the bar for the competition, and get the attention of end-users."   The report noted a divide has formed between smart wearables and basic wearables--devices that do not run third-party applications, and includes most fitness trackers.    -  Price and functionality are the main differences between the two categories, and that gap is expected to widen over time, with the challenge for basic wearables manufacturers trying to compete with the additional features offered by smart wearables while still turning a profit in the price sensitive basic wearables market.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Why the smartwatch will lead to better software

Why the smartwatch will lead to better software | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The reviews are out on the Apple Watch: It’s a great idea that has yet to meet its full potential. Despite gold-plated designs and brand cachet, this year’s most coveted wearable is still falling short.
Richard Platt's insight:

Software is the key to the Apple Watch’s mainstream adoptability.

The onus is on developers to get it right — and so far, many haven’t. It takes more than a shrunken phone app to meet the demands of the smartwatch wearer. As Tumblr cofounder Marco Arment put it, “I originally designed [my] Apple Watch app … with a scaled-down version of the iPhone’s app structure. This seemed like a sensible adaptation of my iOS app to the Apple Watch. In practice, it sucked.”

The newest generation of successful apps aren’t representative of the last. In order to succeed, smartwatch apps must act as extensions of our own internal processes. That level of refinement, in turn, will up the quality of apps on every device.   A new device? Not quite:  The smartwatch isn’t something people carry in their satchels. It’s an extension of the wearer. The watch removes almost every barrier between self and machine. Users won’t tolerate noise on their wrists. They must trust the watch to add value to their lives with every interaction.   -  Smartphone apps in miniature won’t accomplish that, even though the App Store for Apple Watch is full of them. Of the 3,500+ Apple Watch apps in existence today, most will never see the light of profitability. Only 10 apps can appear on the Apple Watch’s selection screen at a time. This heightens the app Darwinism that we’ve been recently seeing on the smartphone and tablet — and it forces app developers to adapt the way they create.    A personal assistant on the wrist:  Techies have been talking about the next digital personal assistant for decades. From Blackberries to robot housekeepers, each device is touted to hit that next level of intelligence. The smartwatch is the latest iteration of this meme, and rightfully so—nobody will tolerate a screaming commercial on their wrist. Every feature on a smartwatch app must be intelligent and adaptable enough to make life easier, every time. Apps that complicate or intrude will quickly be forgotten:   This forces smartwatch app developers to put in more strategic thinking upfront. Getting a user’s attention once is easy. Getting it time and time again, on a device connected to the skin, is an art.    Thinking differently about app development:  The current mentality around app creation harkens back to the days, not so long ago, when mobile app development was like a virtual gold rush. Firms would find a reason to create an app, put it together, test, and iterate until users were happy with it.   -  This approach continues to work in the wearables era, but with far less margin for error. Developers must get it 95% right the first time, because users will quickly delete an app that interferes with their daily routines. The most successful apps will work well with voice control, integrate with sensorsm and employ machine learning to personalize communications and customize alerts. This must happen succinctly and on every screen size.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable technology drives aerospace efficiency and productivity

Wearable technology drives aerospace efficiency and productivity | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Seventy-two million wearable devices will be shipped this year, up a 173 percent from 26.4 million units shipped in 2014, according to International Data Corporation (IDC) analysts in Framingham, Mass., in the company’s Worldwide Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker. 
Richard Platt's insight:

“Wearable smart glasses are being used for airplane manufacturing applications. Quality and field service are other functional areas where smart glasses can be used. Potential use cases involve processes that are time-consuming and error-prone, and that involve complicated assembly procedures,” Schmidt says. “Smart glasses can be a catalytic tool to accelerate the industry’s momentum toward being completely digital – from both a business and technology perspective.   “Wearables can be a game changer especially because they are instrumental in taking the industry to where it is going on a massive scale: to an all-digital mindset all the time,”   -  Armed with the wearable electronics technology, personnel marked all aircraft seat locations down to the last millimeter, as well as checked for accuracy and quality. For Airbus, time spent per aircraft was divided by six, error rate reduced to zero, and marking operations revalued.

“This proof of concept shows how wearable technologies offer new and important benefits in the aerospace and defense industry,” Schmidt says. The project was launched in January 2015, and the first prototype was completed less than a month later. To accelerate the timeline, Airbus and Accenture worked in start-up mode, enabling rapid iterations by engineers at both companies. The technology is currently being industrialized for cabin furnishing on the Airbus A330 wide-body jet airliner. The airframe manufacturer’s other final assembly lines should quickly follow, as well as other Airbus divisions, such as Airbus Defense and Space.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Nymi wristband tackles growing wearables market with security bracelet

Nymi wristband tackles growing wearables market with security bracelet | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Strapping your wallet, house keys and a database of passwords onto your wrist would make life a lot easier, and one Canadian company has created a way to link all of that information with an extra level of security tied to your heartbeat.
Richard Platt's insight:

Honestly I think this technology should get "co-opted" by a "Clever Watch" or even savvy enough "smartwatch" manufacturer (note that the tech it is more than an bloody app), so that the technology is integrated into your normal day to day timepiece.

more...
No comment yet.